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Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Cooperation, Sociology

Want People to Work Together? Familiarity, Ability to Pick Partners Could Be Key

The key to getting people to work together effectively could be giving them the flexibility to choose their collaborators and the comfort of working with established contacts, new research suggests.

Medicine

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Stroke, Ischemic Stroke, tPA, Tpa Treatment, Door to Needle Time, Pharmacists, pharmacists and stroke, RTPA, Tissue Plasminogen Activator, recombinant tissue plasminogen activator

Having a Pharmacist at Stroke Patient's Bedside Speeds Administration of Critical Drug

In treating stroke patients, every minute counts. A drug called rtPA sometimes can stop a stroke in its tracks. Now a Loyola Medicine study has found that having a pharmacist at the patient's bedside can reduce the time it takes to administer rtPA by a median of 23.5 minutes.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Time Management

Task Interrupted: A Plan for Returning Helps You Move On

Get interrupted at work much? Making a quick plan for returning to and completing the task you're leaving will help you focus better on the interrupting work, according to new research from the University of Washington.

Medicine

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Social Science, Child Development

A ‘Touching Sight’: How Babies’ Brains Process Touch Builds Foundations for Learning

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A new study from the University of Washington Institute for Learning & Brain Sciences (I-LABS) provides one of the first looks inside the infant’s brain to show where the sense of touch is processed — not just when a baby feels a touch to the hand or foot, but when the baby sees an adult’s hand or foot being touched, as well. Researchers say these connections help lay the groundwork for the developmental and cognitive skills of imitation and empathy.

Medicine

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West Nile Encephalitis, West Nile Virus, Memory

Memory Loss From West Nile Virus May Be Preventable

People who survive brain infection with West Nile virus can have neurological problems long after the virus is gone. A new study in mice suggests that such ongoing problems may be due to unresolved inflammation that hinders the brain's ability to repair damaged neurons and grow new ones. Reducing inflammation with an arthritis drug protected mice from West Nile-induced memory loss.

Medicine

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Melanoma, Cancer, Drug Resistance, Dendritic Cells

Researchers Identify New Way to Unmask Melanoma Cells to the Immune System

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A research team at the Duke Cancer Institute has found a new way to keep the immune system engaged, and is planning to test the approach in a phase 1 clinical trial.

Science

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dinosaur discovery, Theropod, Acrocanthosaurus, Lidar

University of Arkansas Scientists Digitally Preserve Important Arkansas Dinosaur Tracks

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University of Arkansas researchers used LiDAR imaging to digitally preserve and study important dinosaur tracks.

Science

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Superlattice, X-rays, Synchrotron, Berkeley, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, LBNL, Berkeley Lab, Advanced Light Source, Molecular Foundry, Chirality, Handedness, vorticity

X-Rays Reveal ‘Handedness’ in Swirling Electric Vortices

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Scientists used spiraling X-rays at Berkeley Lab to observe, for the first time, a property that gives left- or right-handedness to swirling electric patterns – dubbed polar vortices – in a layered material called a superlattice.

Medicine

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Pediatric Physician-Scientists Struggle for Funding

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A new, multicenter study that included Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis has found that most NIH grants awarded to researchers in pediatrics during the past five years have been limited to physicians in senior positions at a small number of institutions. The findings indicate an overall downward trend in funding for pediatric research, particularly among early-career physician-scientists.

Medicine

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Cocaine Abuse

Mount Sinai Researchers Identify Protein Involved in Cocaine Addiction

Mount Sinai researchers have identified a protein produced by the immune system—granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF)—that could be responsible for the development of cocaine addiction.







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