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Article ID: 697938

Vibrations at an Exceptional Point

Washington University in St. Louis

A team of international researchers led by engineers at Washington University has developed a way to use a light field to trigger a mechanical movement that will generate an acoustic wave.

Released:
25-Jul-2018 10:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 697859

Women and Older People Under-Represented in Drug Trials for Heart Disease

Universite de Montreal

In the U.S., it's estimated the number of people aged 65 and older will double over the next 30 years. With the first baby boomers now turning 73, the demand for cardiac care is expected to skyrocket, not just in the U.S. but elsewhere as well. Even though they have more cardiovascular problems, fewer women and people over 65 are recruited for randomized clinical trials than men and younger people. To find out, a team of researchers took a close look at the 25 most influential clinical trials for each year in the 20-year period from 1996 to 2015. They compared the age and sex of participants to data published in the U.S. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2015-2016 on the prevalence of cardiovascular disease in America.

Released:
25-Jul-2018 6:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 697876

Unless We Spot Changes, Most Life Experiences Are Fabricated From Memories

Washington University in St. Louis

We may not be able to change recent events in our lives, but how well we remember them plays a key role in how our brains model what’s happening in the present and predict what is likely to occur in the future, finds new research in the Journal of Experimental Psychology: General.

Released:
24-Jul-2018 4:40 PM EDT
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

  • Embargo expired:
    24-Jul-2018 2:30 PM EDT

Article ID: 697798

Alzheimer’s Disease Risk Impacted by the Liver, Diet

Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Reduced levels of plasmalogens are associated with an increased risk of Alzheimer’s Disease, according to new research presented this week at AAIC 2018.

Released:
23-Jul-2018 4:30 PM EDT
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Article ID: 697843

Gas ‘Halos’ Surrounding Young Galaxy Contain Clues to Its Growth

University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Most of the ordinary matter in the universe isn’t in the form of a star or a planet, but gas. And most of that gas exists not in galaxies but around and between them. A team of astronomers has found a new way to study the gas surrounding a young galaxy, BX418, with an eye toward finding clues to how the first galaxies formed.

Released:
24-Jul-2018 1:05 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    24-Jul-2018 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 697628

Pediatric Sepsis Care Within an Hour Decreases Chance of Death, Largest Ever Analysis Finds

Health Sciences at the University of Pittsburgh

More than one in 10 children hospitalized with sepsis die, but when a series of clinical treatments and tests is completed within an hour of its detection, the chances of survival increase considerably.

Released:
19-Jul-2018 12:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 697822

Where Martian Dust Comes From

Johns Hopkins University

The dust that coats much of the surface of Mars originates largely from a single thousand-kilometer-long geological formation near the Red Planet’s equator,

Released:
24-Jul-2018 10:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 697811

Research Shows a Promising New Class of Antibodies Protects Against HIV-1 Infection

Texas Biomedical Research Institute

A group of scientists at Texas Biomedical Research Institute have zeroed in on a new defense against HIV-1, the virus that causes AIDS. Led by Ruth Ruprecht, M.D., Ph.D., the team used an animal model to show for the first time that an antibody called Immunoglobulin M (IgM) was effective in preventing infection after mucosal AIDS virus exposure.

Released:
24-Jul-2018 10:00 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    24-Jul-2018 9:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 697514

Host Antibodies Shape Gut Microbiome by Changing Bacteria Gene Expression

The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers at the RIKEN Center for Integrative Medical Science in Japan have discovered how antibodies secreted in the gut promote the growth of beneficial bacteria. Their study, which will be published July 24 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, shows that immunoglobulin A (IgA) antibodies can alter the expression of bacterial genes, allowing different bacterial species to cooperate with each other and form a community that can protect the body from disease.

Released:
17-Jul-2018 10:50 AM EDT
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Article ID: 697809

Diabetes risk higher among LGBQ teens than heterosexual teens, study finds

Northwestern University

Lesbian, gay, bisexual and questioning youth are more likely to develop Type 2 diabetes, be obese and engage in less physical activity and more sedentary activities than heterosexual youth, a new Northwestern Medicine study has found.

Released:
23-Jul-2018 5:05 PM EDT
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