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Article ID: 694838

Dogs Born in the Summertime More Likely to Suffer Heart Disease

Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Dogs born June through August are at higher risk of heart disease than those born other months, rising in July to 74 percent higher risk, according to a study published this week in Scientific Reports from researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. A correlation to outdoor air pollution may be the culprit.

Released:
18-May-2018 4:30 PM EDT
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    18-May-2018 2:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 694509

Researchers Operate Lab-Grown Heart Cells by Remote Control

University of California San Diego Health

Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine and their collaborators have developed a technique that allows them to speed up or slow down human heart cells growing in a dish on command — simply by shining a light on them and varying its intensity. The cells are grown on a material called graphene, which converts light into electricity, providing a more realistic environment than standard plastic or glass laboratory dishes.

Released:
14-May-2018 11:05 AM EDT
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    18-May-2018 9:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 694530

Cardiomyopathy Mutation Reduces Heart’s Ability to Vary Pumping Force, Study Reveals

The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers from Washington State University have discovered how a genetic mutation linked to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy disrupts the heart’s normal function. The study, which will be published May 18 in the Journal of General Physiology, reveals that the mutation prevents the heart from increasing the amount of force it produces when it needs to pump additional blood around the body.

Released:
14-May-2018 1:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 694792

EMS Providers Could Save Thousands of Lives a Year Using Newer Breathing Tube

University of Alabama at Birmingham

A new study compared EMS use of endotracheal intubation versus a laryngeal tube for patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Results indicate increased survival rates with use of the laryngeal tube.

Released:
17-May-2018 5:05 PM EDT
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    17-May-2018 5:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 694393

Acute Kidney Injury During Hospitalization Linked with Higher Risk of Heart Failure after Discharge

American Society of Nephrology (ASN)

• Among hospitalized adults, those who experienced acute kidney injury were 44% more likely to be hospitalized for heart failure in the year after discharge.

Released:
11-May-2018 9:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 694668

UTHealth Researcher Reveals Results of Study on Emergency Breathing Tubes

University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

In a landmark study, researchers found that patients treated with paramedic oxygen delivery using a newer, more flexible laryngeal breathing tube may have a greater survival rate after sudden cardiac arrest than the traditional intubation breathing tube.

Released:
16-May-2018 11:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 694533

Six Years of Exercise -- or Lack of It -- May Be Enough to Change Heart Failure Risk

Johns Hopkins Medicine

By analyzing reported physical activity levels over time in more than 11,000 American adults, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers conclude that increasing physical activity to recommended levels over as few as six years in middle age is associated with a significantly decreased risk of heart failure, a condition that affects an estimated 5 million to 6 million Americans.

Released:
15-May-2018 8:00 AM EDT
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    15-May-2018 8:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 694531

Omega-3, Omega-6 in Diet Alters Gene Expression in Obesity

American Physiological Society (APS)

A new study reveals that essential fats in the diet may play a role in regulating protein secretion in the muscles by changing the way genes associated with secretion act. The study is published ahead of print in Physiological Genomics.

Released:
14-May-2018 2:00 PM EDT
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Article ID: 694541

Study Finds Acetaminophen Helps Reduce Acute Kidney Injury Risk in Children Following Cardiac Surgery

Vanderbilt University Medical Center

Children who underwent cardiac surgery were less likely to develop acute kidney injury if they had been treated with acetaminophen in the first 48 hours after their procedures, according to a Vanderbilt study just published in JAMA Pediatrics.

Released:
14-May-2018 2:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 694525

Heart Disease Severity May Depend on Nitric Oxide Levels

Case Western Reserve University

The most common heart medications may get an assist from nitric oxide circulating in the body, according to a new study out of Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. Researchers showed that nitric oxide may help commonly used heart drugs maximize their benefits while improving heart function. In turn, the study found nitric oxide deficiencies could underlie heart failure while tilting drug effects toward more harmful pathways and side effects.

Released:
14-May-2018 12:05 PM EDT
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