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Limiting Protein Reduces Post-Heart Attack Injury in Mice

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According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, approximately 735,000 Americans experience a heart attack each year. Opening a blocked coronary artery to restore blood flow to the heart prevents sudden cardiac death. However, doing so also triggers cardiac damage through oxidative stress and inflammation, which eventually can lead to heart failure. In a new study, researchers at the University of Missouri School of Medicine have identified a protein that can be targeted to decrease post-heart attack injury and prevent heart failure in a mouse model.

Medicine

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Liver Cancer, Liver Disease, Liver Damage, Hepatitis, Statins, Statin Drugs, High Cholesterol, Fatty Liver, Physiology

Statins May Provide Treatment Alternative for Chronic Liver Disease

Statin drugs are widely used to manage high cholesterol and reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease. But in a new review of more than 50 studies, researchers cite reductions in liver inflammation and improvements in other related factors as reasons why statins make good candidates for treating chronic liver disease.

Medicine

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Angioplasty, coronary spasm, Coronary Artery Disease, Stent, Catheterization, Cardiovascular

A Simple Fix to Avoid Unnecessary Coronary Stents Is Overlooked by Cardiologists and Current Cardiovascular Guidelines

Physician researchers at Thomas Jefferson University suspect that some cases of coronary artery spasm go unrecognized and are incorrectly treated with stents. The good news – there could be a simple fix to eliminate these unnecessary stenting procedures. The team published a case series in Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions.

Medicine

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Cholesterol, Artery Disease, accessible pool of cholesterol, accessible cholesterol, NanoSIMS

Researchers Explore a New Method to Study Cholesterol Distribution on Cells

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Researchers have developed a new way of visualizing the distribution of cholesterol in cells and tissues. Their research provides insights into the movement of cholesterol into and out of cells and could eventually identify mechanisms linking cholesterol to coronary artery disease.

Medicine

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Atrial fibrilation, ablation therapy, Ablation, intermountain medical center, intermountain healthcare, Afib, Heart Disease, Heart Attack

New Markers Associated with Recurrence of Atrial Fibrillation in Previously Treated Patients

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Ablation procedures restore a regular heartbeat in patients who have a dangerous, abnormal heart rhythm called atrial fibrillation. But it doesn’t always work. Now, a new study suggests that certain molecules are associated with the recurrence of erratic heartbeats in some patients after ablation therapy.

Medicine

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Heart Disease, LDL, Heart Attack, intermountain medical center, intermountain healthcare, Plaque, Arteries, Lipid, Research

New Study Finds Potential Breakthrough in Determining Who’s at Risk for Heart Attacks

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Researchers are revisiting their views on the relative dangers soft and hard atherosclerotic plaque deposits pose to heart health. Findings of a new study by researchers at the Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute may be a “game-changer” for determining who’s at risk of a heart attack, they say.

Medicine

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Heart Research, Atrial Fibrillation, Stroke, intermountain medical center, intermountain healthcare, American College Of Cardiology, Warfarin, Blood Thinners

Combining Risk Score Tools Improves Stroke and Mortality Prediction for Atrial Fibrillation Patients

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Combining two independent, scientifically-proven risk measurements allows physicians to better predict an atrial fibrillation patient’s risk of stroke or death. The tools also help determine the need for blood thinners in treatment, according to new research from researchers at the Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute in Salt Lake City.

Medicine

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Statin, Cholesterol, Disparities, African American Health, Cardiology, statin guidelines

African Americans May Receive Different Advice on Statin Therapy

Study investigates whether modern statin guidelines accurately identify African American patients with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease.

Medicine

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Penn Medicine, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Cardiovascular Medicine, Pulmonary Embolism

High-Risk Pulmonary Embolism Patients Often Go Without Most Effective Treatments

A typical intervention for PE patients includes anticoagulants in an effort to prevent migration of the blood clot, but the higher-risk PE population – about 30 percent of all PE patients – are potential candidates for catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT) and systemic thrombolysis (ST), both of which employ “clot-busting” medications known as tissue plasminogen activator (tPA). However, in a new study presented today at the American College of Cardiology 66th Annual Scientific Session, researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania have found that the utilization rates of these potentially life-saving medications are low, particularly in the sub-group of PE patients who are critically ill.

Medicine

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Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy, Cardiology, inherited heart defect cardiomyopathy

Moderate Exercise May Be Beneficial for HCM Patients

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Patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy are urged to take it easy. But new research shows they might benefit from moderate aerobic exercise.







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