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Cardiovascular Health

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Medicine

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Obesity, Heart Disease, Weight Loss, Bariatric Surgery, Cardiac, Stanford University School of Medicine, American Society for Metabolic & Bariatric Surgery, ASMBS

New Study Shows Women Have Lower Risk of Heart Disease After Weight-Loss Surgery Than Men

Women have about a 20 percent less chance of developing heart disease after weight-loss surgery than men, according to new research* presented today at ObesityWeek 2016, the largest international event focused on the basic science, clinical application and prevention and treatment of obesity. The annual conference is hosted by the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery (ASMBS) and The Obesity Society (TOS).

Medicine

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Stroke, Heart Attack, Collateral Vessels

UNC Scientists Identify “Collateral Vessel” Gene That Protects Against Stroke Damage

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During stroke or heart attack, tissue damage can be limited because “collateral” vessels connect the tissue to other arteries. Collateral vessels can vary greatly in size and number from one person to the next. Scientists have now implicated the Rabep2 gene as a major contributor to variation.

Medicine

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sodium reduction, Sodium intake, Pediatric Nutrition, Cardiovascular Risk Factors, National Health And Nutrition Examination Survey

Kids Continue to Consume Too Much Salt, Putting Them at Risk

Cardiovascular disease, including heart disease and stroke, kills more than 800,000 Americans each year. We know that too much salt may contribute to high blood pressure and increased cardiovascular risk. According to a new study in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, American children are consuming sodium at levels that far exceed the daily recommended limit. Taste preferences for high sodium foods, formed as children, follow individuals into adulthood and put them at increased risk for developing cardiovascular problems later in life.

Medicine

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Mount Sinai Health System, Mount Sinai Heart, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Heart Failure, Heart Transplantation, Cardiology and Heart Surgery, Heart Surgery, Cardiac, CME credit

Mount Sinai Heart Hosts Advanced Heart Disease Symposium

The 2016 Mount Sinai ADVANCED Heart Disease Symposium is a one-day intensive state-of-the-art review of heart failure and advanced cardiac care, consisting of didactic lectures, debates and expert panel discussions of emerging or controversial topics in heart failure, mechanical circulatory support and cardiac transplantation.

Medicine

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Stroke, Cardiology, Atrial Fibrillation

Initial Results of LAA Closure Device for Stroke Prevention in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation Demonstrate Device Safety and Low Rates of Major Adverse Events

Initial results from the largest, prospective evaluation of a percutaneous transcatheter left atrial appendage (LAA) closure device (Amplatzer Amulet) for stroke prevention in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation show that the device has a high implant success rate and low major adverse events.

Medicine

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Ashikaga, Corkscrew, Heart, Blood, stroke, Cardiac

'Corkscrew' Shape of Blood Flow in Heart's Upper Chamber May Signal Lower Stroke Risk

Using specialized CT scans of a healthy heart and one with heart disease, a team of Johns Hopkins cardiologists and biomedical engineers say they've created computer models of the "shape" of blood flow through the heart's upper left chamber that someday may help predict stroke risk.

Medicine

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Diabetes, Inflammation, Macrophages, fatty acid synthesis, Fatty Acid Synthase, Obesity

Cause of Inflammation in Diabetes Identified

Inflammation is one of the main reasons why people with diabetes experience heart attacks, strokes, kidney problems and other, related complications. Now, in a surprise finding, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have discovered, in mice, that when certain immune cells can’t manufacture fat, the mice don’t develop diabetes and inflammation, even when consuming a high-fat diet.

Medicine

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Coronary Artery, Stent, Cardiology, Medicine

Study Finds No Long-Term Clinical Benefit to Routine Follow-Up Coronary Angiography After PCI

A randomized evaluation of routine follow-up coronary angiography after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) found that there was no long-term clinical benefit compared to clinical follow-up alone among unselected patients following PCI.

Medicine

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Women, Coronary Artery, Stent, Cardiology

Dedicated Stent Study Conducted in Women and Minority Assesses Risks of Adverse Cardiovascular Events Following Coronary Stent Procedures

A dedicated stent study conducted exclusively in women and minority patients evaluated clinical outcomes within the era of contemporary PCI, comparing these results to a parallel cohort of white male patients. Although there were no significant differences in stent-related outcomes, both groups had higher rates of death and myocardial infarction (MI) in the first year following the procedure.

Medicine

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Stroke, Cardiology, Medicine

Long-Term Study Results Show That PFO Closure Is More Effective Than Medical Management in Preventing Recurrent Stroke

Final results from the RESPECT trial found that percutaneously closing a patent foramen ovale (PFO) using the Amplatzer PFO Occluder was superior to medical management in the prevention of recurrent ischemic stroke in patients who previously had a cryptogenic stroke.

Medicine

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Coronary Artery Disease, Stent, Cardiology

Study Indicates PCI of NIRS-Defined Lipid-Rich Plaque Is Safe and Not Associated with a Greater Incidence of Adverse Outcomes Compared to PCI of Non Lipid-Rich Plaque

Two-year results from COLOR, the first large-scale multicenter prospective study of its kind, found that PCI on coronary artery lipid-rich plaque (LRP) detected by near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) was not associated with subsequent major adverse cardiac events (MACE) compared to PCI of non-LRPs.

Medicine

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Aortic Valve Replacement, Aortic Stenosis, Cardiology, Medicine

Five Year Echocardiogram Follow-Up Data Demonstrates Sustained Durability After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in High-Risk and Inoperable Patients

A substudy of the PARTNER I Trial and Continued Access Registry found that hemodynamic trends in patients who received transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) showed excellent durability without significant structural valve deterioration at five years. The trial represents the largest to-date longitudinal analysis of echocardiographic hemodynamic parameters systematically assessed by a core laboratory.

Medicine

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Aortic Valve Replacement, Aortic Stenosis, Cardiology, Medicine

Patients with Severe Aortic Stenosis and Intermediate Surgical Risk Show Similar Late Quality of Life Outcomes Following Either Transcatheter or Surgical Aortic Valve Replacement

Patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS) at intermediate surgical risk, and who are treated with transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) had improved health status at one month compared with surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) but two-year quality of life outcomes were similar. Prior studies have shown that TAVR results in an early quality of life (QoL) benefit in patients at high surgical risk; however, the effect of TAVR versus. SAVR on QoL in intermediate risk patients was unknown prior to this study.

Medicine

Channels:

Aortic Valve Replacement, Cardiology, Medicine, clinical trial

Study Finds Use of Adjunctive Cerebral Embolic Protection During Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement Was Safe but Improvement in MRI Findings Did Not Reach Statistical Significance

A multicenter randomized trial evaluating the role of embolic protection using the Sentinel device during transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) found that the device was safe but did not meet the primary efficacy endpoint of reduction in median new lesion volume in protected territories assessed by MRI at 2-7 days. In addition, neurocognitive function was not significantly improved.

Medicine

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Cardiology

For TAVR Patients, Transcatheter Cerebral Embolic Protection Is Safe but More Research Is Needed to Demonstrate Efficacy

An international study has found that transcatheter cerebral embolic protection (TCEP) is safe, provides effective capture of embolic debris and does not change neurocognitive function for transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) patients.

Medicine

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Critical Care, Hospitals, Hospitalization, Nursing, University of Arkanas for Medical Sciences, Depression, Fatigue, gender and disease, patient outcomes, Heart Failure

Managing Depression, Fatigue in Patients with Heart Failure May Reduce Hospital Stays, Mortality

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A study in the American Journal of Critical Care found that patients with both fatigue and depression were hospitalized more than those without either condition. They also had more visits to the emergency department and longer lengths of stay.

Medicine

Channels:

Ut Southwestern, Heart Regeneration, hypoci, Cardiomyocytes

Low-Oxygen Environment Leads to Heart Regeneration in Mice, UTSW Research Shows

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Normal, healthy heart muscle is well-supplied with oxygen-rich blood. But UT Southwestern Medical Center cardiologists have been able to regenerate heart muscle by placing mice in an extremely low-oxygen environment.

Medicine

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Acupuncture, Hypertension, alternative medicine, Cardiology

UCI Study Finds Acupuncture Lowers Hypertension by Activating Opioids

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Researchers with the UCI Susan Samueli Center for Integrative Medicine have found that regular electroacupunture treatment can lower hypertension by increasing the release of a kind of opioid in the brainstem region that controls blood pressure.

Medicine

Channels:

Hospital Quality, shared decision making, Cardiology, Patient Care, patient advocacy

Shared Decision Making Between Patient and Physician Can Improve Health

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Medicine

Channels:

Coronary Artery Disease, Cardiology, Stent

TCT 2016 First Report Investigations Examine Potential for Novel Bioresorbable Stent Technologies

The 28th annual Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics (TCT), the annual scientific symposium of the Cardiovascular Research Foundation (CRF) featured a number of first report investigations on novel stents that could become the next generation of bioresorbable stents in patients.







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