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Cardiovascular Health

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Medicine

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Cholesterol, Ldl Cholesterol, LDL, Heart Attack, Stroke, Cholesterol Test, Research, intermountain medical center, intermountain healthcare, American Heart Association, Cardiology

Follow-Up Cholesterol Testing Reduces Risk of Reocurrence for Heart Attack and Stroke Patients

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If you have a heart attack or stroke, it’s important to get your “bad” cholesterol measured by your doctor on a follow up visit. Researchers have found that one step is significantly associated with a reduced risk of suffering another serious cardiovascular episode.

Medicine

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Cholesterol, Statins, Statin Drugs, Heart Attack, Stroke, Heart Disease, Cardiology, intermountain medical center, intermountain healthcare, American Heart Association, Research, Heart Attack Prevention

Heart Attack, Stroke Patients Prescribed Statin Medication Upon Discharge Have Better Long-Term Outcomes

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Patients with a prior history of heart attacks or stroke have better outcomes when cholesterol-lowering medications are used after they’re discharged from the hospital, according to a new study from the Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute in Salt Lake City.

Medicine

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Cardiology, Hospital Readmission Reduction Program , Heart Failure, Medicare

Federal Policy to Reduce Re-Hospitalizations Is Linked to Increased Mortality Rates

Federal policymakers five years ago introduced the Hospital Readmission Reduction Program to spur hospitals to reduce Medicare readmission rates by penalizing them if they didn’t. A new analysis led by researchers at UCLA and Harvard University, however, finds that the program may be so focused on keeping some patients out of the hospital that related death rates are increasing.

Medicine

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Cardiology, Heart Failure, Ejection Fraction

Heart’s Pumping Function Is Not an Indicator of Heart Failure Survival Rates

Contrary to popular practice, a measure of the heart’s pumping function known as “left ventricular ejection fraction” is not associated with the long-term outcomes of hospitalized heart failure patients, a UCLA-led study of Medicare patients has found. Hospitalized heart failure patients in all age groups within the study and with all levels of ejection fraction had significantly lower rates of survival after five years and a higher risk of re-hospitalization than people in the United States without heart failure. Better treatments for heart failure and new ways of predicting patient outcomes are needed, researchers concluded.

Medicine

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Sudden Cardiac Arrest, sex and heart attack, sex and SCA

Sex Poses Little Risk of Triggering Sudden Cardiac Arrest

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Worried whether your heart health is strong enough for sex? A new study may lay your fears to rest: The risk that sex would trigger a sudden cardiac arrest is exceedingly small.

Medicine

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Penn Medicine, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Sudden Cardiac Arrest, Bystander CPR, Cardiology, Emergency Medicine, American Heart Association, AHA Scientific Sessions

Penn Study Finds Men Are More Likely To Receive CPR in Public than Women

When it comes to your likelihood of receiving bystander CPR if you experience a Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) in public, it turns out your gender may play a lifesaving role. According to a new study from researchers in the Center for Resuscitation Science at Penn Medicine, which is being presented at the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions 2017, men are more likely to receive bystander CPR in public than women.

Medicine

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CHF, HF, Heart Failure, heart failure symptoms, heart failure treatments, Heart Disease

What Causes Congestive Heart Failure Hospitalizations?

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Heart failure (HF) affects approximately 5.7 million adults in the United States according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. If not properly managed, HF can lead to frequent hospitalizations. A heart failure hospitalization should be viewed as a sentinel event. Five year survival after a heart failure hospitalization is only 20 percent, a prognosis that is worse than most cancer diagnoses. Importantly, if HF is properly managed by team of skilled heart failure clinicians, prognosis and quality of life can improve.

Medicine

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Heart Disease, Cardiology, Textbook, cardiovascular catheterization

TTUHSC El Paso Faculty Publish Cardiology Textbook

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A textbook guiding cardiologists on the latest treatments in cardiovascular medicine was recently published by two faculty members at Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center El Paso (TTUHSC El Paso).

Medicine

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Study: Former NFL Players More Likely to Have Enlarged Aortas

Former NFL players were more likely to have enlarged aortas, but further study is needed to determine whether that puts them at greater risk for life-threatening aneurysms, researchers found.

Medicine

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Blood Flow, Neuro, Cardio Vascualar Disease

Reduced Blood Flow from Heart May Reduce Blood Flow in Brain’s Memory Center

Older people whose hearts pump less blood may have reduced blood flow in the memory-processing areas of the brain, according to a study published in the November 8, 2017, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.







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