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Science

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Neanderthal, DNA, Genome, Evolution, Genetics

Genetic Study of Neanderthal DNA Reveals Early Split Between Humans and Neanderthals

In this week's issue of Science, researchers suggest an early human-Neanderthal split. The two species have a common ancestry, say the authors, but do not share much else after evolving their separate ways. The study also finds no evidence of genetic admixture between Neanderthals and humans.

Science

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Biblical, Archaeology, Health, Religion, Essene, DEAD, Sea, Scrolls

Remote Latrine Reconfirms the Presence of Essene Sect at Qumran

Recent bioarchaeological findings at the ancient Dead Sea settlement of Qumran confirm the existence of a strange communal latrine --located at a remote distance, conforming with extreme hygiene practices described in ancient texts and possibly accounting for a documented early mortality rate at the settlement.

Science

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Seasonal, Diet, Early, Human, Relatives, Paranthropus, Teeth, Laser, Ablation

Buffet for Early Human Relatives 1.8 Million Years Ago

University of Utah scientists improved a method of testing fossil teeth, and showed that early human relatives varied their diets with the seasons 1.8 million years ago, eating leaves and fruit when available in addition to seeds, roots, tubers and perhaps grazing animals.

Science

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Archaeology, Tombs, Ancient, Syria, UMM, El Marra, TUBA

Early Bronze Age Mortuary Complex Discovered in Syria

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An ancient, untouched Syrian tomb that wowed the archaeological world on its discovery by Johns Hopkins University researchers nearly six years ago is not alone. Additional excavations have yielded a total of at least eight tombs filled with human and animal remains, gold and silver treasures and unbroken artifacts dating back to the third millennium B.C.

Science

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Juvenile, Australopithecine, Fossil, Hadar, Lucy

Geologists Help Find and Explain "Lucy's Child"

University of South Florida geologists, members of an international team, help find and explain rare, juvenile Australopithecine afarensis fossil remains 3.3 million years old.

Science

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Olmec, Ancient Writing System, AL, Cascajal Block

Stone Nearly 3,000 Years Old Shows West's Oldest Known Writings

Carved across the surface of a 26-pound stone slab unearthed in Veracruz, Mexico is the oldest known writing ever discovered in the Americas.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Maya, Agriculture, Consumers, Consumerism, Ethnography, Anthropology, South America

"Broccoli & Desire" Explores Connections Between Maya Farmers, American Consumers

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Have you considered how many hands it took to get the broccoli you just purchased from the field to your table? Did you know that it quite possibly came from Guatemala? Did you ever consider that someone grew that broccoli for you so they could send their kids to a better school? Anthropologists Edward Fischer and Peter Benson answer these questions and more in their new book, Broccoli & Desire, tracing the complex connections between the hopes and dreams of Maya farmers in Guatemala and the health and dietary choices made by shoppers in Nashville, Tenn.

Science

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Raptor, Eagle, Monkey, Human, Evolution, PREY, Taung, Child

Ancient Raptors Likely Feasted on Early Man

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A new study suggests that prehistoric birds of prey made meals out of some of our earliest human ancestors. Researchers drew this conclusion after studying more than 600 bones from modern-day monkeys. They had collected the bones from beneath the nests of African crowned eagles in the Ivory Coast's Tai rainforest.

Science

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Ecology, Environment, Oldworld, Archaeology, Geology, Geography, Anthropology, Migration, Population

Remote Island Provides Clues on Population Growth, Environmental Degradation

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Halfway between South America and New Zealand, in the remote South Pacific, is Rapa. This horseshoe-shaped, 13.5 square-mile island of volcanic origin, located essentially in the middle of nowhere, is "a microcosm of the world's situation," says a University of Oregon archaeologist.

Science

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Columbus Shipwrecks, Taino, Dominican Republic

Archaeologists Hot on the Trail of Columbus' Sunken Ships

Indiana University archaeologists say they are closer to discovering some of Christopher Columbus' lost ships -- and the answer to a 500-year-old mystery, "What was on those ships?"







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