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Article ID: 552984

Common Autism Medication is Ineffective for Repetitive Behaviors

Seattle Children's Hospital

Citalopram (Celexa), a medication commonly prescribed to children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD), was no more effective than a placebo at reducing repetitive behaviors, according to a multi-site clinical trial.

Released:
2-Jun-2009 11:35 AM EDT
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Article ID: 552968

Antidepressant Ineffective in Reducing Obsessive Behavior in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

North Shore-Long Island Jewish Health System (North Shore-LIJ Health System)

A new multi-center study, conducted at The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research in collaboration with five other centers throughout the country, tested the commonly prescribed antidepressant citalopram and found that it was no more effective than placebo in altering obsessive features of the condition "“ the spinning, rocking and repetitive behavior.

Released:
1-Jun-2009 9:15 PM EDT
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

  • Embargo expired:
    1-Jun-2009 4:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 552869

Antidepressant Does Not Stop Repetitive Behaviors in Autistic Children

JAMA - Journal of the American Medical Association

The antidepressant citalopram does not appear to reduce the occurrence of repetitive behaviors in children and teens with autism spectrum disorders, according to a report in the June issue of Archives of General Psychiatry, one of the JAMA/Archives journals.

Released:
28-May-2009 7:40 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    1-Jun-2009 4:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 552825

Autism Drug Citalopram Is Ineffective, Causes Significant Side Effects

University of North Carolina Health Care System

A drug commonly given to autistic children to reduce repetitive behaviors is ineffective and may increase repetitive behaviors. "The short term message is, this treatment didn't work. That surprised us. More importantly, we have to do large, scientifically-sound comparative studies, not rely on doctors' and families' impressions," says co-authorLin Sikich, M.D., at the UNC School of Medicine.

Released:
28-May-2009 10:40 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    19-May-2009 4:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 552537

Scientists Identify New Gene Linked to Autism Risk, Especially in Boys

University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

UCLA scientists have discovered a variant of a gene that may increase a child's risk of developing autism, particularly in boys.

Released:
18-May-2009 8:15 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    10-May-2009 1:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 552098

Impaired Brain Plasticity Linked to Angelman Syndrome Learning Deficits

University of North Carolina Health Care System

Researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine and Duke University find that impaired brain plasticity may explain how disruption of a single gene in the brain can cause severe cognitive deficits.

Released:
6-May-2009 2:10 PM EDT
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Article ID: 552189

Autism Studies Presented at Mid-Atlantic Research Consortium Meeting

Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

Autism spectrum disorders were the centerpiece of a symposium of major mid-Atlantic research centers. Investigators presented multifaceted research using genetics, neurobiology and imaging studies to investigate the intricate puzzle of autism.

Released:
8-May-2009 10:50 AM EDT
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