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Medicine

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C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital National Poll on Children’s Health , Substance Use, Teens, Adolescent

“Other Teens Drink and Use Marijuana but My Kids Don’t,” Parents Say in New Poll

Parents of teens likely underestimate own teens’ substance use, while overestimating marijuana and alcohol use by teens nationally.

Medicine

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National Survey Shows a Rise in Illicit Drug Use from 2008 to 2010

Increased rates of marijuana use drive increase, especially among young adults.

Medicine

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Smoking, Smoking Cessation, Smoking Cessation Intervention, Employee Health, Public Health Policy

SmokingPaST Framework: New Planning Tool Helps Employers, Towns and State and National Policymakers Determine Lives Saved, and ROI from Tobacco Treatment Efforts

The newly released Smoking Prevalence, Savings, and Treatment (SmokingPaST) Framework is a tool designed to calculate the impact of investments in tobacco treatment programs on health and medical cost savings. The framework combines what is already known about the medical costs of smoking, the health benefits of quitting and the effectiveness of different quit methods.

Medicine

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Smoking, Tobacco, Cessation, comorbid mental conditions, Michael Ong

Smokers with Comorbid Conditions Need Help from Their Doctors to Quit

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Smokers who also have alcohol, drug and mental disorders would benefit greatly from smoking cession counseling from their primary care physicians and would be five times more successful at kicking the habit

Medicine

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Addiction Medicine, Methamphetamine, Cell Phone Pictures, Modafinil, MEMS, American Society Of Addiction Medicine

Cell Phone Pictures May Aid Treatment for Methamphetamine Addiction

Sending cell phone pictures of medications before taking them may provide a simple but effective way to monitor compliance with prescribed treatment for methamphetamine addiction, reports a study in the September Journal of Addiction Medicine, the official journal of the American Society of Addiction Medicine. The journal is published by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, a part of Wolters Kluwer Health

Medicine

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Alcoholism, Impulse Control Disorders, Mental Health and Substance Abuse, Mortality Risk

Impulsive Alcoholics Likely to Die Sooner

Alcohol and impulsivity are a dangerous mix: People with current drinking problems and poor impulse control are more likely to die in the next 15 years, a new study suggests.

Medicine

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Menthol, menthol cigarettes, Smoking, Tobacco, Smoking Cessation, Tobacco Cessation, New Jersey

Menthol Cigarettes May Make it Tougher to Quit Smoking for Certain Populations

Could a mint-flavored additive to cigarettes have a negative impact on smoking cessation efforts? New research from investigators at The Cancer Institute of New Jersey and UMDNJ-School of Public Health shines a light on this topic. It finds that menthol cigarettes are associated with decreased quitting in the United States, and that this effect is more pronounced for blacks and Puerto Ricans.

Medicine

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Tanning addiction, Tanning Bed, Tanning, Addiction, Psychiatry, Dr. Bryon Adinoff

Tanning Bed Users Exhibit Brain Changes and Behavior Similar to Addicts

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People who frequently use tanning beds may be spurred by an addictive neurological reward-and-reinforcement trigger, researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center have found in a pilot study.

Medicine

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Depression, Addiction, Stress, Serotonin, kappa-opioid receptors

Researchers Identify Possible Therapeutic Target for Depression and Addiction

Researchers studying mice are getting closer to understanding how stress affects mood and motivation for drugs. Blocking the stress cascade in brain cells may help reduce the effects of stress, which can include anxiety, depression and the pursuit of addictive drugs.

Medicine

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Smoking Behaviors, Adolescent Smoking, tobacco use, Teen Behavior, Risk Behaviors

High School Students Today Less Likely to Be Heavy Smokers

A new study found that of the 19.5 percent of high school students who call themselves smokers, most don’t smoke daily or frequently.







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