Press "esc" to clear
Go to Advanced Search

Showing results

901910 of 998

Article ID: 560832

The Almond Tree's Secret Weapon

University of Haifa

The nectar of the almond tree produces an extraordinary and dangerous poison. This is the only known plant to have this poison in its flowers' nectar. A study carried out at the University of Haifa has revealed that bees are mysteriously drawn to the toxic substance.

Released:
28-Jan-2010 9:00 AM EST
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab
Add to Favorites
Comment

Article ID: 560658

Plant Evolution Led to Permanent Changes to the Way Rivers Looked and Behaved

Dalhousie University

During the Paleozoic era, the evolution of complex land plants forced the evolution of rivers from nothing but vast braided streams to the variety of different forms and sizes we see today according to researchers at Dalhousie University in Halifax, Nova Scotia.

Released:
25-Jan-2010 11:50 AM EST
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab
Add to Favorites
Comment
  • Embargo expired:
    13-Jan-2010 1:00 PM EST

Article ID: 560236

Chimp and Human Y Chromosomes Evolving Faster than Expected

Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research

The first comprehensive comparison of Y chromosomes from two species sheds new light on Y chromosome evolution. Contrary to a widely held scientific theory that the mammalian Y chromosome is slowly decaying or stagnating, new evidence suggests that in fact the Y is continuously reinventing itself.

Released:
11-Jan-2010 8:30 PM EST
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab
Add to Favorites
Comment
  • Embargo expired:
    7-Jan-2010 2:00 PM EST

Article ID: 559998

New Approach Precisely Tracks Evolution’s Footprints in the Human Genome

Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard

Fossils may provide tantalizing clues to human history but they also lack some vital information, such as revealing which pieces of human DNA have been favored by evolution because they confer beneficial traits — resistance to infection or the ability to digest milk, for example. Now, researchers describe a method for pinpointing these preferred regions that offers greater precision and resolution than ever before, and the possibility of deeply understanding both our genetic past and present.

Released:
4-Jan-2010 3:30 PM EST
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab
Add to Favorites
Comment
koopwithnet.jpg
  • Embargo expired:
    5-Jan-2010 8:00 PM EST

Article ID: 559997

Birds Fight Alien Parasites

University of Utah

University of Utah biologists found that finches – the birds Darwin studied – develop antibodies against two parasites that moved to the Galapagos Islands, suggesting the birds can fight the alien invaders.

Released:
4-Jan-2010 11:00 PM EST
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab
Add to Favorites
LagarVelho1-uCTteeth.jpg

Article ID: 560005

Ongoing Evolution Among Modern Humans: the View from the Teeth

Washington University in St. Louis

An international team of researchers, including Erik Trinkaus, professor of Anthropology at Washington University in Saint Louis, has reanalyzed the complete immature dentition of a 30,000 year-old-child from the Abrigo do Lagar Velho, Portugal. The new analysis of the Lagar Velho child shows that these “early modern humans” were “modern” without being “fully modern.”

Released:
4-Jan-2010 5:00 PM EST
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab
Add to Favorites
Comment

Article ID: 559966

Top Ten Evolution/Creationism Stories of the Year

National Center for Science Education

Darwin celebrated; evolution still under attack. The Year in Review.

Released:
31-Dec-2009 2:20 PM EST
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab
Add to Favorites
Comment
Image3_90dpi.jpg

Article ID: 559928

1st Molars Provide Insight Into Evolution of Great Apes, Humans

Arizona State University College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

The timing of molar emergence and its relation to growth and reproduction in apes is being reported by scientists at Arizona State University’s Institute of Human Origins. “We can use the same techniques to calculate ages at first molar emergence from the fossils of early hominids that just happened to die while their first molars were erupting,” they say.

Released:
28-Dec-2009 7:00 PM EST
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab
Add to Favorites
Comment

Article ID: 559882

Birds Provide Clues in How Humans Learn Speech

University of Chicago

Research on communication in animals helps understand of how language develops in humans and how they use it. Language is a phenomenon of evolutionary biology.

Released:
22-Dec-2009 9:00 PM EST
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab
Add to Favorites
Comment

Social and Behavioral Sciences

mudsnail.jpg

Article ID: 559802

Sex and the Single Snail: Study Shows Benefits of Sexual Reproduction Over Asexual

University of Virginia

A new study provides credence to the understanding that asexual reproduction allows for the ongoing accumulation and replication of harmful mutations, leaving less room for adaptation to rapidly changing environments.

Released:
18-Dec-2009 11:35 AM EST
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab
Add to Favorites
Comment

Showing results

901910 of 998





Chat now!