Early vs. Late Gamma Knife Radiosurgery Following Transsphenoidal Surgery for Nonfunctioning Pituitary Macroadenomas: A Matched Multi-Center Cohort Study

A presentation at the 2017 American Association of Neurological Surgeons Annual Scientific Meeting

Article ID: 673128

Released: 24-Apr-2017 12:05 PM EDT

Source Newsroom: American Association of Neurological Surgeons (AANS)

Newswise — Winner of the Leksell Radiosurgery Award, Jason P. Sheehan, MD, PhD, FAANS, presented his research, Early vs. Late Gamma Knife Radiosurgery Following Transsphenoidal Surgery for Nonfunctioning Pituitary Macroadenomas: a Matched Multi-center Cohort Study, during the 2017 American Association of Neurological Surgeons (AANS) Annual Scientific Meeting.

 

Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is frequently used to treat residual or recurrent nonfunctioning pituitary macroadenomas. There is no consensus as to whether SRS should be used early after surgery or if radiosurgery should be withheld until there is evidence of imaging-defined tumor progression. Given the high incidence of adenoma progression after subtotal resection, the study evaluated the effect of timing of radiosurgery on outcome.

 

A multi-center study of patients with nonfunctioning pituitary macroadenomas who underwent partial resection followed by SRS from 1987 to 2015 was conducted at nine institutions of the International Gamma Knife Research Foundation. Patients were matched by adenoma types and radiosurgical parameters and stratified based on the interval between resection and radiosurgery. Operative results, imaging and clinical outcomes were compared across groups following early (SRS delivered <= 6 months from the time of resection) or late (SRS delivered > 6 months from the time of resection) radiosurgery.

 

After matching, 222 patients met the study criteria and were grouped based on early or late SRS following transsphenoidal surgery. There was a greater risk of tumor progression in the late radiosurgical group over a median imaging follow-up period of 68.5 months. No significant difference in occurrence of post-GKRS endocrinopathy was observed. Thirty percent of patients without endocrinopathy in the early cohort developed new endocrinopathies during the follow-up period versus 27 percent in the late cohort. Fourteen percent of the early group and 25 percent of the late group experienced resolution of endocrine dysfunction since original presentation.

 

Results of the study indicate that early SRS decreases the risk of radiographic progression of sub-totally resected nonfunctioning pituitary macroadenomas compared to expectant management followed by late radiosurgery. Delaying radiosurgery may place patients at increased risk for long-term adenoma progression. Early radiosurgery may be preferred in nonfunctioning pituitary adenoma patients with residual tumor after surgery and a life expectancy of five or more years.  The timing of radiosurgery does not appear to significantly affect the rate of delayed endocrinopathy.

 

Author Block: Jonathan Pomeraniec; Hideyuki Kano; Zhiyuan Xu; Brandon Nguyen; Zaid Siddiqui; Danilo Silva; Mayur Sharma; Christian Iorio-Morin; Amparo Wolf; John Jane Jr.; Inga Grills; David Mathieu; Douglas Kondziolka; Cheng-Chia Lee; Gene Barnett; L. Dade Lunsford; Chih-Chun Wu; Chris Cifarelli; Tomas Chytka; Hesham Radwan; Jonathan Cohen; and Robert Dallapiazza

Disclosure: The author reported no conflicts of interest.

 

Media Representatives: The 2017 AANS Annual Scientific Meeting press section will include releases on highlighted scientific research, AANS officers and award winners, Neurosurgery Awareness Month and other relevant information about the 2017 program. Releases will be posted under the “Media” area on the 2017 AANS Annual Scientific Meeting website. If you have interest in a topic related to neurosurgery or would like to interview a neurosurgeon — either onsite or via telephone — during the event, please contact Alice Kelsey, AANS associate executive director, via email at aik@aans.org.

 

About the 2017 AANS Annual Scientific Meeting: Attended by neurosurgeons, neurosurgical residents, medical students, neuroscience nurses, clinical specialists, physician assistants, allied health professionals and other medical professionals, the AANS Annual Scientific Meeting is the largest gathering of neurosurgeons in the nation, with an emphasis on the field’s latest research and technological advances. The scientific presentations accepted for the 2017 event will represent cutting-edge examples of the incredible developments taking place within the field of neurosurgery. Find additional information about the 2017 AANS Annual Scientific Meeting and the meeting program here.

 

Founded in 1931 as the Harvey Cushing Society, the American Association of Neurological Surgeons (AANS) is a scientific and educational association with more than 10,000 members worldwide. The AANS is dedicated to advancing the specialty of neurological surgery in order to provide the highest quality of neurosurgical care to the public. Fellows of the AANS are board-certified by the American Board of Neurological Surgery, the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada or the Mexican Council of Neurological Surgery, A.C. Neurosurgery is the medical specialty concerned with the prevention, diagnosis, treatment and rehabilitation of disorders that affect the spinal column, spinal cord, brain, nervous system and peripheral nerves.

 

For more information, visit www.AANS.org.


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