Endocrine Society Expert can Provide Clarity on Menopausal Hormone Therapy and Risk of Breast Cancer

Released: 20-Oct-2010 12:50 PM EDT
Source Newsroom: Endocrine Society
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Newswise — Richard J. Santen, MD, lead author of The Endocrine Society’s Scientific Statement on menopausal hormone therapy, can provide clarity on the association of hormone therapy and increased risk of breast cancer as reported in an article published this week in The Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA).

The new study published in JAMA found that women who took estrogen and progesterone to treat menopausal symptoms and developed breast cancer were more likely to have cancerous lymph nodes and were more likely to die from the disease than were breast cancer patients who had never taken hormones. The results confirm trends reported in the Society’s scientific statement.

Dr. Santen, professor of medicine at the University of Virginia Health System, is available to provide comment on the JAMA study and further clarify the association between hormone therapy and breast cancer development and mortality.

The Society’s scientific statement on menopausal hormone therapy can be found at: http://www.endo-society.org/journals/scientificstatements. The Hormone Foundation, the patient education affiliate of The Endocrine Society, recently published a fact sheet to provide information on the current state of the science regarding postmenopausal hormone therapy. This fact sheet can be found at: http://www.hormone.org/upload/postmenopausal-hormone-therapy-061910.pdf.

WHO: Dr. Richard J. Santen
Endocrine Society spokesperson on menopausal hormone therapy
Professor of Medicine
University of Virginia Health System

WHAT: Dr. Santen, lead author of “Postmenopausal Hormone Therapy: An Endocrine Society Scientific Statement” is available to discuss the risk of breast cancer association with menopausal hormone therapy.

Founded in 1916, The Endocrine Society is the world’s oldest, largest and most active organization devoted to research on hormones and the clinical practice of endocrinology. Today, The Endocrine Society’s membership consists of over 14,000 scientists, physicians, educators, nurses and students in more than 100 countries. Society members represent all basic, applied and clinical interests in endocrinology. The Endocrine Society is based in Chevy Chase, Maryland. To learn more about the Society and the field of endocrinology, visit our Web site at www.endo-society.org.


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