Latest News

Filters:

  • (Press "esc" to clear)

Medicine

Keywords:

Johns Hopkins Malaria Research Institute Hosts World Malaria Day

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health is bringing together some of the best minds in academia, government and faith-based organizations on World Malaria Day, Friday, April 25, 2014, for a day of discussion on leveraging community involvement to combat malaria in Africa. World Malaria Day, sponsored by the World Health Organization (WHO), has been celebrated globally each year since 2008.

View | Comment

Science

Keywords:

Biologist Vera Gorbunova to Lead $9.5 Million Multi-Institution Longevity Research Project

2009-12-09_Vera_Gorbunova.jpg

University of Rochester Professor of Biology Vera Gorbunova, whose innovative research on DNA repair and the aging process has been internationally recognized, has been awarded a $9.5 million grant from the National Institute on Aging to study longevity.

View | Comment

Medicine

Channels:

Keywords:

Stem Cells in Circulating Blood Affect Cardiovascular Health

New research suggests that attempts to isolate an elusive adult stem cell from blood to understand and potentially improve cardiovascular health – a task considered possible but very difficult – might not be necessary.

View | Comment

Medicine

Channels:

Keywords:

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 4/28/2014 12:05 AM EDT

Life

Education

New Master’s Designation Combines STEM and Professional Skills

armycorpsofengineers.JPG

The Professional Science Master's National Office named the Great Lakes Ecosystem Science M.S. to its list of affiliated PSM programs. PSM graduate programs, which prepare STEM practitioners for management roles, are the fastest-growing type of graduate program in the U.S.

View | Comment

Medicine

Channels:

Keywords:

New Study Finds 2.5 Million Basketball Injuries to High School Athletes in Six Seasons

BasketballInjuries.jpg

Basketball is a popular high school sport in the United States with 1 million participants annually. A recently published study by researchers in the Center for Injury Research and Policy at Nationwide Children’s Hospital is the first to compare and describe the occurrence and distribution patterns of basketball-related injuries treated in emergency departments and the high school athletic training setting among adolescents and teens.

View | Comment

Medicine

Channels:

Keywords:

Higher Education Associated With Better Recovery From Traumatic Brain Injury

Better-educated people appear to be significantly more likely to recover from a moderate to severe traumatic brain injury (TBI), suggesting that a brain’s “cognitive reserve” may play a role in helping people get back to their previous lives, new Johns Hopkins research shows.

View | Comment

Medicine

Channels:

Keywords:

Study Examines Risk of Early Death for People with Mild Cognitive Impairment

One of the first studies to look at a relationship between death and the two types of mild cognitive impairment (MCI), or problems with memory and thinking abilities, suggests that people who have thinking problems but their memory is still intact might have a higher death rate in a period of six years compared to those who have no thinking or memory problems. The research was released today and will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology’s 66th Annual Meeting in Philadelphia, April 26 to May 3, 2014. The same was suggested in the study for those who are experiencing MCI with memory decline; however the first group had the highest death rate.

View | Comment

Medicine

Channels:

Keywords:

People with More Education May Recover Better from Traumatic Brain Injury

People with more years of education may be better able to recover from a traumatic brain injury, according to a study published in the April 23, 2014, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

View | Comment

Medicine

Channels:

Keywords:

People with Mild Cognitive Impairment May Die at Higher Rate Than People Without Condition

Mayo Clinic research studying the relationship between death and the two types of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) suggests that people who have these conditions die at a higher rate than people without MCI. The research was released today and will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology’s 66th Annual Meeting in Philadelphia, April 26 to May 3, 2014.

View | Comment