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How to Trust What Your Customers Say About Your Brand

Marketers would love to get inside the consumer’s brain. And now they can. Researchers at UC Berkeley’s Haas School of Business are using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to see if what people say about brands matches what they are actually thinking.

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Study Reveals Latest Evidence that Prejudice Causes the Perception of Threat--and Suggests that Threat Can Be Used to Justify Actions that Result from Prejudice

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When people feel or act negatively toward a group, they may explain their feelings or behavior by saying, “I felt threatened.” However, new research reveals how easily people can be conditioned to feel prejudice -- and that unrecognized prejudice can be the source of a perceived threat. The study by Angela Bahns, a social psychologist and professor at Wellesley College, is published this month in the journal Group Processes and Intergroup Relations.

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Scientists Identify That Memories Can Be Lost and Found

A team of scientists believe they have shown that memories are more robust than we thought and have identified the process in the brain, which could help rescue lost memories or bury bad memories, and pave the way for new drugs and treatment for people with memory problems.

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EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 4-Aug-2015 9:00 AM EDT

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Head Impacts and Collegiate Football Practice and Games

Researchers at the University of Virginia (UVa) examined the number and severity of subconcussive head impacts sustained by college football players over an entire season during practices and games. The researchers found that the number of head impacts varied depending on the intensity of the activity.

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Fish That Have Their Own Fish Finders

African fish called mormyrids communicate by means of electric signals. Fish in one group can glean detailed information from a signal’s waveform, but fish in another group are insensitive to waveform variations. Research at Washington University in St. Louis has uncovered the neurological basis for this difference in perception.

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Gut Microbes Affect Circadian Rhythms in Mice, Study Says

A study including researchers from the U.S. Department of Energy’s Argonne National Laboratory and the University of Chicago found evidence that gut microbes affect circadian rhythms and metabolism in mice.

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Chronic Insomnia Sufferers May Find Relief with Half of Standard Sleeping Pill Dosing Regimen

The roughly nine million Americans who rely on prescription sleeping pills to treat chronic insomnia may be able to get relief from as little as half of the drugs, and may even be helped by taking placebos in the treatment plan, according to new research published today in the journal Sleep Medicine by researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. Their findings starkly contrast with the standard prescribing practices for chronic insomnia treatment.

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MedStar Washington Neonatal ICU Achieves Three Years without a Single Central Line Infection

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A huge safety milestone for MedStar Washington Hospital Center's Neonatal Intensive Care Unit -- three years without a single central line infection in its smallest babies! The NICU hit the three-year mark on July 31, the longest stretch without a Central Line-Associated Bloodstream Infection (CLABSI) in any intensive care unit at the Hospital Center. What’s the unit’s secret? A teamwork has a lot to do with it.

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2015 ACR/ARHP Annual Meeting Press Registration Now Open

Registration is now open to journalists planning to attend the 2015 ACR/ARHP Annual Meeting.