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Three-Banded Panther Worm Debuts as a New Model in the Study of Regeneration

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The lab of Whitehead Institute Member Peter Reddien is introducing the scientific community to the three-banded panther worm (Hofstenia miamia), a small organism with the ability to regenerate any missing body part. As a model, Hofstenia could help further our understanding of regeneration, how its mechanisms have evolved over millennia, and what limits regeneration in other animals, including humans. Intriguingly, Hofstenia and the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea—long the mainstay of Reddien’s research—rely on similar molecular pathways to control regeneration despite having evolved separately over the course of roughly 550 million years.

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Scripps Research Institute Scientists Find New Point of Attack on HIV for Vaccine Development

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A team led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) working with the International AIDS Vaccine Initiative (IAVI) has discovered a new vulnerable site on the HIV virus.

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To Mark Territory or Not to Mark Territory: Breaking the Pheromone Code

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A team led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute has deciphered the surprisingly versatile code by which chemical cues help trigger some of the most basic behaviors in mice.

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Researchers Discover New Genetic Brain Disorder in Humans

A newly identified genetic disorder associated with degeneration of the central and peripheral nervous systems in humans, along with the genetic cause, is reported in the April 24, 2014 issue of Cell.

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New Type Of Protein Action Found To Regulate Development

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Johns Hopkins researchers report they have figured out how the aptly named protein Botch blocks the signaling protein called Notch, which helps regulate development. In a report on the discovery, to appear online April 24 in the journal Cell Reports, the scientists say they expect the work to lead to a better understanding of how a single protein, Notch, directs actions needed for the healthy development of organs as diverse as brains and kidneys.

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Fruitfly Study Identifies Brain Circuit that Drives Daily Cycles of Rest, Activity

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Researchers describe a circuit in the brain of fruit flies that controls their daily, rhythmic behavior of rest and activity. They also found that the fly version of the human brain protein known as corticotrophin releasing factor is a major coordinating molecule in this circuit.

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Oldest Pterodactyloid Species Discovered, Named by International Team of Researchers

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An international research team, including a George Washington University (GW) professor, has discovered and named the earliest and most primitive pterodactyloid—a group of flying reptiles that would go on to become the largest known flying creatures to have ever existed—and established they flew above the earth some 163 million years ago, longer than previously known.

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Researchers Pinpoint Protein Crucial for Development of Biological Rhythms in Mice

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Johns Hopkins researchers report that they have identified a protein essential to the formation of the tiny brain region in mice that coordinates sleep-wake cycles and other so-called circadian rhythms.

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Surprising New Insights Into PTEN Tumor Suppressor Gene

Ever since it was first identified more than 15 years ago, the PTEN gene has been known to play a key role in preventing the onset and progression of numerous cancers. New research from Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center helps explain how.

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New Alfalfa Variety Resists Ravenous Local Pest

Cornell University plant breeders have released a new alfalfa variety with some resistance against the alfalfa snout beetle, which has ravaged alfalfa fields in nine northern New York counties and across the St. Lawrence River in Canada.

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