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Medicine

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Celnik, foot, feet, hand, Brain, Cerebellum, Learning, Motor, task

Getting a Leg Up: Hand Task Training Transfers Motor Knowledge to Feet

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The human brain's cerebellum controls the body's ability to tightly and accurately coordinate and time movements as fine as picking up a pin and as muscular as running a foot race. Now, Johns Hopkins researchers have added to evidence that this structure also helps transfer so-called motor learning from one part of the body to another.

Medicine

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Opioid, opioid abuse, opioid addiction treatment, Opioid Addiction, drug abuse treatment, Pain Medicine

Expert Opinion: Beware the Stampede on Reducing Opioids

As a physician, I urge caution as we cut back opioids

Science

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printable electronics, 3-D printing, inkjet printing, memory devices, additive manufacturing, resistive memory (ReRAM), Electronics, Bernard Huber, P.B. Popp, M. Kaiser, Andreas Ruediger, Christina Schindler, Munich University of Applied Sciences, INRS-EMT, Applied Physics Letters

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A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 4-Apr-2017 11:00 AM EDT

Medicine

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Obesity, Diabetes, Heart Disease, risk, risk calculator, Metabolic Syndrome, Disease Risk, Stroke, BMI, Body Mass Index, Cholesterol, UVA, University Of Virginia, University of Virginia School of Medicine, UVA School of Medicine, University Of Florida, Mark DeBoer, Matthew Gurka, Pediatrics, Children, Medical Research, Race, Gender, Ethnicity, metabolic severity, Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiology, High Blood Pressure, Blood Sugar, High Blood Sugar, fasting blood sugar, Triglycerides, triglyceride level, HDL, LDL, Type 2 Diabetes

Internet Crystal Ball Can Predict Risk of Heart Disease, Diabetes, Study Finds

An online calculator predicts people's risk for heart disease and diabetes more accurately than traditional methods, a large study has found. Creators hope it will prompt patients to make lifestyle changes that would spare them the suffering and expense of avoidable illnesses.

Science

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Graphene, graphene nanoribbons, Nanoscience, nanotechnnology, Materials Science, Materials Science & Engineering, Chemistry, Physics, Department Of Energy, Department of Energy (DOE), Semiconductor, Conductor, Metal, Catalyst, scanning tunneling microscopy

Built From the Bottom Up, Nanoribbons Pave the Way to ‘on–Off’ States for Graphene

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Scientists at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and North Carolina State University report in the journal Nature Communications that they are the first to grow graphene nanoribbons without a metal substrate.

Medicine

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Julie Brahmer, Cancer, Immunotherapy, drug, nivolumab, Lung Cancer, Johns Hopkins, Clinical Trial

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 3-Apr-2017 8:30 AM EDT

Medicine

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Dengue, Virus, Aedes

NUS Scientists Discover Novel Vulnerabilities in Dengue Virus

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A team of researchers from the National University of Singapore has uncovered hidden vulnerabilities on the surface of the dengue virus.

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Tigers, Ready to Be Counted (with Video)

A new methodology developed by the Indian Statistical Institute, and WCS (Wildlife Conservation Society) may revolutionize how to count tigers and other big cats over large landscapes.

Medicine

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Nutrition, Children, Pregnancy, Parents

New Book From Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Helps Parents Make the Best Food and Lifestyle Choices for Their Baby

From preconception to post-delivery, a new book from the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and registered dietitian Elizabeth Ward provides first-time and experienced parents with the latest advice on how good nutrition and other lifestyle habits can help them have the healthiest baby possible.

Science

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Kansas State University, K-State, KSU, Kansas State, Gurpreet Singh, Polymer, Patent, Ceramic, Water, waterlike, SiBNC, high-temperature, Mechanical Engineering, Engineering

Engineer Patents Waterlike Polymer to Create High-Temperature Ceramics

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Using five ingredients — silicon, boron, carbon, nitrogen and hydrogen — a Kansas State University engineer has created a liquid polymer that can transform into a ceramic with valuable thermal, optical and electronic properties.







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