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University of Illinois Hospital & Health Sciences System and Shriners Hospitals for Children-Chicago Partner to Provide Specialized Pediatric Care

Shriners Hospitals for Children-Chicago and the University of Illinois Hospital & Health Sciences System (UI Health) have signed an affiliation agreement to enhance their existing partnership and provide expanded pediatric specialty medical services to their patients.

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EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 22-Dec-2014 11:00 AM EST

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Neal First, Whose Work Led to Cattle Cloning, Dies at 84

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Emeritus Professor Neal First, a pioneer in cattle reproduction and cloning who studied animal physiology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison for 45 years, died Nov. 20 from complications of cancer. His work in the 1980s on how sperm and eggs are prepared, or matured, for fertilization set the stage for in vitro fertilization of cattle.

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Instant-Start Computers Possible with New Breakthrough

If data could be encoded without current, it would require much less energy and make things like low-power, instant-on computing a ubiquitous reality. A team at Cornell University has made a breakthrough in that direction with a room-temperature magnetoelectric memory device. Equivalent to one computer bit, it exhibits the holy grail of next-generation nonvolatile memory: magnetic switchability, in two steps, with nothing but an electric field. Their results were published online Dec. 17 in Nature.

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The Dust Devil and the Details: Spinning Up a Storm on Mars

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Spinning up a dust devil in the thin air of Mars requires a stronger updraft than is needed to create a similar vortex on Earth, according to research at The University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH). Early results from this research in UAH’s Atmospheric Science Department are scheduled for presentation today at the American Geophysical Union’s fall meeting in San Francisco. “To start a dust devil on Mars you need convection, a strong updraft,” said Bryce Williams, an atmospheric science graduate student at UAH. “We looked at the ratio between convection and surface turbulence to find the sweet spot where there is enough updraft to overcome the low level wind and turbulence. And on Mars, where we think the process that creates a vortex is more easily disrupted by frictional dissipation – turbulence and wind at the surface – you need twice as much convective updraft as you do on Earth.” Williams and UAH’s Dr. Udaysankar Nair looked for the dust devil sweet spot by combining dat

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Educated Guesses: Top 15 Predictions for 2015

For the 34th consecutive year, The University of Alabama’s Office of Media Relations offers predictions from faculty experts for the coming year. See our list of the Top 15 “Educated Guesses” for 2015.

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Impact of New Cuba Policy on Scientific Collaboration and Exchange Between U.S. And Cuban Researchers

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Scientists at UT Southwestern, Karolinska Institutet Identify New and Beneficial Function of Endogenous Retroviruses in Immune Response

Researchers at UT Southwestern and Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm, Sweden, found that endogenous retroviruses (ERV) play a critical role in the body’s immune defense against common bacterial and viral pathogens.

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Russel E. Kaufman Steps Down as President/CEO of the Wistar Institute

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Russel E. Kaufman steps down as the Wistar Institute President & CEO and Dario C. Altieri, Wistar Cancer Center Director, named new CEO.

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Machine Learning Reveals Unexpected Genetic Roots of Cancers, Autism and Other Disorders

University of Toronto researchers from Engineering, Biology and Medicine teach computers to ‘read the human genome’ and rate likelihood of mutations causing disease, opening vast new possibilities for medicine

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