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Penguin Parents: Inability to Share Roles Increases Their Vulnerability to Climate Change

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Young penguins suffer at feeding time due to an inflexible division of parental duties.

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You Scratch My Back and I Might Scratch Yours: The Grooming Habits of Wild Chimpanzees

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Bystanders can influence the way adult male chimpanzees establish grooming interactions according to research by anthropologists at the University of Kent.

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Alcohol Also Damages the Liver by Allowing Bacteria to Infiltrate

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Alcohol itself can directly damage liver cells. Now researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine report evidence that alcohol is also harmful to the liver for a second reason — it allows gut bacteria to migrate to the liver, promoting alcohol-induced liver disease. The study, conducted in mice and in laboratory samples, is published February 10 in Cell Host & Microbe.

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Maryland House of Delegates Honors University Of Maryland School of Medicine Dean E. Albert Reece and University Of Maryland Medical System President & CEO Robert Chrencik

The Maryland House of Delegates and House Speaker Michael E. Busch, has announced that University of Maryland School of Medicine Dean E. Albert Reece, MD, PhD, MBA and University of Maryland Medical System President and CEO Robert Chrencik, MBA, are recipients of the “Speaker’s Medallion,” the highest honor given to the public by the leader of the Maryland House of Delegates.

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What Are Gravitational Waves? "Ask a Spaceman!" Astronomer/Popular Science Podcaster Available to Comment on LIGO

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Predicting Who Will Develop Multiple Sclerosis

New project will investigate the events leading to multiple sclerosis in at at-risk individuals.

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Scientists Take Nanoparticle Snapshots

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An international team of researchers led by X-ray scientist Christoph Bostedt of the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory and Tais Gorkhover of DOE’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory used two special lasers to observe the dynamics of a small sample of xenon as it was heated to a plasma.

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Scripps Florida Researchers Develop ‘LIGHTSABR’—A Cheap, Portable Drug-Discovery System

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Scientists at the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute have developed a device that can do the functional equivalent of high-throughput compound screening on an ultra-miniaturized scale.

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Room-Temperature Lithium Metal Battery Closer to Reality

Rechargeable lithium metal batteries offer energy storage capabilities far superior to today’s workhorse lithium-ion technology that powers our smartphones and laptops. But these batteries are not in common use today because, when recharged, they spontaneously grow treelike bumps called dendrites that can trigger short-circuiting and cause a potential safety hazard.

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Climate Change Helps Bats to Spread Their Wings

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Study on Kuhl's pipistrelle shows why bats have moved across Europe since the 1980s.

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Your Brain May Be What Interests That Guy Checking You Out

Modern men increasingly value brains over beauty when choosing long-term mates.

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Einstein Expert Available to Comment on Gravitational Waves Announcement

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Healing the Soil

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Chicago’s history of industrialization and urbanization left its mark on the soil. Soil acts as a sponge, and can host contaminants for years. In Chicago, the waste from industrial manufacturing causes undesirable toxic organic chemicals, heavy metals, and other chemicals to linger in the soil. This can pose problems for the health of the humans and plants that inhabit the land years later. A non-profit youth development center hopes to repurpose lots into useful spaces for the community. However, the poor quality soils in the lots create challenges.

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Cell News—Remember Where You’re Going?

In bloodhounds and neutrophils, getting the scent is not enough. Dogs and immune cells have to remember the chemoattractant they are pursuing, even when it momentarily fades out or threatens to overwhelm.

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EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 12-Feb-2016 5:00 AM EST

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Rise in Marijuana Use Not as High as Previously Reported

Washington University School of Medicine researchers report an estimated 12.5 percent of adults living in the United States use marijuana, but their research also shows that the rate of pot use did not double from 2002 to 2013 — as had been reported in the fall — but instead increased by about 20 percent. Meanwhile, the rate of problems related to the drug has remained steady.

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Genetics Help Fish Thrive in Toxic Environments, Collaborative Study Finds

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A 10-year collaborative project led by biologists from Kansas State University and Washington State University has discovered how the Atlantic molly is able to live in toxic hydrogen sulfide water.

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Hold On! The Ability to Hold a Grip Predicts Who Has the Willpower Finish Their Schoolwork

Researchers at McMaster University have established a connection between a person’s ability to maintain a firm grip and having the self-control to finish their schoolwork.

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AERA Announces Most Read Education Research Articles of 2015

Research on special education, non-cognitive skills, degree completion, educational inequality and more appeared in the 10 most popular journal articles published by the American Educational Research Association in 2015. Based on the number of times they were accessed online, the following were the most popular AERA research articles published in 2015.

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Whooping Cranes' Predatory Behavior Key for Adaptation, Survival

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The whooping crane, with its snowy white plumage and trumpeting call, is one of the most beloved American birds, and one of the most endangered. As captive-raised cranes are re-introduced in Louisiana, they are gaining a new descriptor: natural killer. A new study from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, suggests Louisiana cranes are faring well thanks in part to their penchant for hunting reptiles and amphibians.