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  • Embargo expired:
    28-Mar-2018 7:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 691783

Sea Turtles Use Flippers to Manipulate Food

PeerJ

Sea turtles use their flippers to handle prey despite the limbs being evolutionarily designed for locomotion, a discovery by Monterey Bay Aquarium researchers published today in PeerJ.

Released:
27-Mar-2018 11:00 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    11-Jan-2018 7:00 AM EST

Article ID: 687727

New Turkey-Sized Dinosaur From Australia Preserved in an Ancient Log-Jam

PeerJ

The partial skeleton of a new species of turkey-sized herbivorous dinosaur has been discovered in 113 million year old rocks in southeastern Australia. The fossilized tail and foot bones give new insight into the diversity of the small, bipedal herbivorous dinosaurs called ornithopods.

Released:
10-Jan-2018 7:00 AM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    12-Dec-2017 7:00 AM EST

Article ID: 686431

Water Extraction in the Colorado River Places Native Species at Risk of Extinction

PeerJ

Agriculture and domestic activities consume much of the Colorado River water that once flowed to the Colorado Delta and Northern Gulf of California. The nature and extent of impact of this fresh-water loss on the ecology and fisheries of the Colorado Delta and Gulf of California is controversial. A recent publication in the journal PeerJ reveals a previously unseen risk to the unique local biodiversity of the tidal portion of the Delta.

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7-Dec-2017 3:00 PM EST
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Article ID: 686564

Scientists Urge Endangered Listing for Cheetahs

PeerJ

In a study published today in the open-access journal PeerJ, researchers present evidence that low cheetah population estimates in southern Africa support a call to list the cheetah as “Endangered” on the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List.

Released:
11-Dec-2017 7:00 AM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    10-Oct-2017 7:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 682442

Researchers Map the Illegal Use of Natural Resources in the Protected Brazilian Amazon

PeerJ

New research published in the open access peer-reviewed journal PeerJ uses law enforcement data collected from 2010 to 2015 to understand the geographical distribution of the illegal use of natural resources across the region’s protected area network.

Released:
6-Oct-2017 10:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 682134

Ancient Petrified Salamander Reveals Its Last Meal

PeerJ

A new study on an exceptionally preserved salamander from the Eocene of France reveals that its soft organs are conserved under its skin and bones. Organs preserved in three dimensions include the lung, nerves, gut, and within it, the last meal of the animal, according to a study published in the peer-reviewed journal PeerJ.

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3-Oct-2017 7:00 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    29-Aug-2017 7:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 680068

Woolly Rhino Neck Ribs Provide Clues About Their Decline and Eventual Extinction

PeerJ

Researchers from the Naturalis Biodiversity Center in Leiden examined woolly rhino and modern rhino neck vertebrae from several European and American museum collections and noticed that the remains of woolly rhinos from the North Sea often possess a ‘cervical’ (neck) rib—in contrast to modern rhinos. The study, published in the open access journal PeerJ today, reports on the incidence of abnormal cervical vertebrae in woolly rhinos. Given the considerable birth defects that are associated with this condition, the researchers argue it is very possible that developmental abnormalities contributed towards the eventual extinction of these late Pleistocene rhinos.

Released:
25-Aug-2017 7:00 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    29-Aug-2017 7:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 680069

An Alternative to Wolf Control to Save Endangered Caribou

PeerJ

In a recent study, researchers used a new Canadian government policy as an experiment and found that reducing invasive moose populations has led to population stability for endangered caribou herds.

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25-Aug-2017 5:05 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    22-Aug-2017 7:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 679809

A Potential Breeding Site of a Miocene Era Baleen Whale

PeerJ

Baleen whales are amongst the largest animals to have ever lived and yet very little is known about their breeding habits. One researcher’s second look at previously found baleen whale fossils from Japan provides new evidence of a now long-gone breeding ground of the extinct baleen whale Parietobalaena yamaokai dating back over 15 million years.

Released:
18-Aug-2017 7:05 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    1-Aug-2017 7:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 678591

Can Insects Be Used as Evidence to Tell if a Body Has Been Moved?

PeerJ

The use of insects as indicators of post-mortem displacement is a familiar technique depicted on many crime investigation TV shows. In reality, this practice is far from clear-cut. To cut through the hype, researchers have looked across existing studies to review how exactly insects have been used in legal investigations and to what extent these methods have been useful.

Released:
27-Jul-2017 12:05 PM EDT
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