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Science

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University of Vienna, University of Belgrade, , Austrian Academy of Sciences, Borivoje Dakić , Aleksandra Dimić , Fingerprints, quantum entanglement, Quantum, Quantum Computer, npj Quantum Information , Nature Publishing Group, Open Access

Fingerprints of Quantum Entanglement

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Quantum entanglement is a key feature of a quantum computer. Yet, how can we verify that a quantum computer indeed incorporates a large-scale entanglement? Using conventional methods is hard since they require a large number of repeated measurements. Aleksandra Dimić from the University of Belgrade and Borivoje Dakić from the Austrian Academy of Sciences and the University of Vienna have developed a novel method where in many cases even a single experimental run suffices to prove the presence of entanglement. Their surprising results will be published in the online open access journal npj Quantum Information of the Nature Publishing group.

Science

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University of Vienna, quantum-clock, Cesare Franchini, Schrödinger equation, multiple quantum interactions , Material, Quantum Computers, Ferroelectric

The Schrödinger Equation as a Quantum Clock

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Materials with controllable quantum mechanical properties are of great importance for the electronics and quantum computers of the future. However, finding or designing realistic materials that actually have these effects is a big challenge. Now, an international theory and computational team led by Cesare Franchini from the University of Vienna, find that multiple quantum interactions can coexist in a single real material and show how an electric field can be used to control them. The results of this research are now published in Nature Communications.

Science

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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University of Vienna, Giorgia Silani, Clothes make the woman, Empathy, objectification, secondary sexual characteristics, Psychology, sexualized women, Cortex

Clothes Make the Woman: Less Empathy Towards Women Showing More Skin

Sexualized representations, especially the emphasis of secondary sexual characteristics, can change the way we perceive an individual. An international team of researchers led by Giorgia Silani from the Faculty of Psychology at the University of Vienna has shown that empathic feelings and brain responses are reduced when we observe the emotions of sexualized women. The results of the study were recently published in the renown scientific journal "Cortex".

Science

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University of Vienna, Lisa Weiß, Lisa Weiss, Johannes-Gutenberg University of Mainz , Nanomaterials, linear and ring-shaped molecules, Christos Likos , Arash Nikoubashman, Physic, Separate, Macromolecules, separate nano- and microparticles

Nanomaterials: How to Separate Linear and Ring-Shaped Molecules

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What is the difference between linear chains and rings composed of the same material? The molecular building blocks are identical, but from a mathematical point of view the two structures have distinct topologies, namely ring and linear chain. This difference is readily recognizable on a macroscopic scale, as for example a golden ring and a gold bar, but represents a tricky task on the microscopic scale. The physicists Lisa Weiss and Christos Likos of the University of Vienna and Arash Nikoubashman of the Johannes-Gutenberg University of Mainz investigated strategies to separate nano- and microparticles of distinct topology. Their results are published in the high-impact journal ACS Macro Letters.

Science

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University of Vienna, Markus Arndt, nano-watch, Duisburg-Essen, Tel Aviv University, nanomechanical hand, silicon nanorod, laser beams, Nature Communications

Nano-Watch Has Steady Hands

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An international team from the Universities of Vienna, Duisburg-Essen and Tel Aviv have created a nanomechanical hand to show the time of an electronic clock, by spinning a tiny cylinder using light. A silicon nanorod, less than a thousandth of a millimetre long, can be trapped in thin air using focussed laser beams, and spun to follow the ticking of a clock, losing only one-millionth of a second over four days.

Medicine

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University of Vienna, Pavel Kovarik, Max F. Perutz Laboratories (MFPL), Medical University of Vienna, Queen’s University Belfast, PLoS Pathogens, Natural Killer Cells, Superbug, Klebsiella, Multidrug Resistance, Human Health, Sepsis

Veni Vidi Vici: How Natural Killer Cells Conquer the Superbug Klebsiella

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Multidrug resistance of microbes poses a serious global threat to human health. Such resistant strains of Klebsiella pneumoniae significantly reduce therapeutic options for the treatment of Klebsiella-induced, potentially fatal pneumonia or sepsis. Pavel Kovarik and his team at the Max F. Perutz Laboratories (MFPL), a joint venture of the University of Vienna and the Medical University of Vienna, together with colleagues at Queen’s University Belfast now report new insights into how immune cells communicate at the site of infection and join forces in the fight against Klebsiella infections. Their results, published in the journal PLOS Pathogens, might be used for the development of alternatives to ineffective anti-microbial drugs.

Science

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University of Vienna, Alice Auersperg, Cornelia Habl, University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna, Goffin cockatoo, NUT, tool-use, cognitive biologists, Parrot

The Key to a Nut

The Goffin's cockatoo is not a specialised tool user in the wild but has shown the capacity to invent and use different types of tools in captivity. Now cognitive biologists from the University of Vienna and the University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna tested these parrots in a tool use task, requiring the birds to move objects in relation to a surface. The animals had to choose the correct "key" to insert into a "keyhole" in a box, aligning its shape to the shape of a surface cutout inside the box during insertion. The parrots were not only able to select the correct key but also required fewer placement attempts to align simple shapes than primates in a similar study.

Science

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Nanotechnology, University of Vienna, Christoph Dellago, Jumping Nanoparticles, Nanoscale, Transitions, thermal noise, Friction, nature nanotechnology, ETH Zurich, ICFO Barcelona, laser-trapped particle, Kramers’ prediction

Jumping Nanoparticles

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Transitions occurring in nanoscale systems, such as a chemical reaction or the folding of a protein, are strongly affected by friction and thermal noise. Almost 80 years ago, the Dutch physicist Hendrik Kramers predicted that such transitions occur most frequently at intermediate friction, an effect known as Kramers turnover. Now, reporting in Nature Nanotechnology, a team of scientists from the ETH Zurich, ICFO in Barcelona and the University of Vienna have measured this effect for a laser-trapped particle, directly confirming Kramers’ prediction in an experiment for the first time.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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University of Vienna, mother-in-law, Mother, Household, anthropologists, Evolution, Martin Fieder, intercultural data, Worldwide, Royal Society Open Science, reproductive competition , Fertility

Household with Mother(-in-Law) Means Fewer Kids

Women who live with their own mother or their mother in law in the same household have, on average, fewer children than women who only live with their spouse. Martin Fieder and colleagues, evolutionary anthropologists from the University of Vienna, report this on the basis of intercultural data of 2.5 million women worldwide. Until now, evolutionary biologists have assumed the opposite. The study appears in the renowned scientific journal "Royal Society Open Science".

Science

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University of Vienna, Austrian Academy of Science, Magma Oceans, Exoplanets, Nature Astronomy, Space Research, Induction Heating

Formation of Magma Oceans on Exoplanets

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Induction heating can completely change the energy budget of an exoplanet and even melt its interior. In a study published by Nature Astronomy an international team led by the Space Research Institute of the Austrian Academy of Sciences with participation of the University of Vienna explains how magma oceans can form under the surface of exoplanets as a result of induction heating.







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