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Article ID: 690076

Bioengineering Today: Imaging the Heart

American Institute of Physics (AIP)

Cardiovascular disease is the number one killer in the United States and around the world. February is American Heart Month, and to honor healthy heart health awareness, Bioengineering Today, an editorially independent news service of AIP Publishing, is featuring stories on heart imaging this month.

Released:
23-Feb-2018 3:50 PM EST
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Cardiovascular Health, Engineering, Local - Maryland, Local - DC Metro

BPS-Parikh-cropped.jpg
  • Embargo expired:
    21-Feb-2018 8:00 AM EST

Article ID: 689724

‘Local Environment’ Plays Key Role in Breast Cancer Progression

Biophysical Society

Many of the drugs and therapies available today for treating breast cancer target the cancer cells but tend to neglect the surrounding “local environment,” which includes surrounding tissues. But cancer cells and their local environment are connected, so both undergo chemical and physical changes during tumor development. During the 62nd Biophysical Society Meeting, researchers will present work exploring the role physical changes within a cancer cells’ local environment play in the aggressiveness of breast cancer.

Released:
16-Feb-2018 1:05 PM EST
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Article ID: 689849

MEMS Chips Get Metalenses

American Institute of Physics (AIP)

Lens technologies have advanced across all scales, from digital cameras and high bandwidth in fiber optics to the LIGO lab instruments. Now, a new lens technology that could be produced using standard computer-chip technology is emerging and could replace the bulky layers and complex geometries of traditional curved lenses. Researchers at Harvard and Argonne National Laboratory have developed a device that integrates mid-infrared spectrum metalenses onto MEMS. They report their work in this week’s APL Photonics.

Released:
20-Feb-2018 2:05 PM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    20-Feb-2018 11:00 AM EST

Article ID: 689682

Why Polymer Solar Cells Deserve Their Place in the Sun

American Institute of Physics (AIP)

Organic polymer solar cells show potential to provide solar power to remote microwatt sensors, wearable technology and the Wi-Fi-connected appliances constituting the “internet of things.” While PSCs cannot match the durability or efficiency of inorganic solar cells, the potential to mass-produce nontoxic, disposable solar panels using roll-to-roll production makes them attractive for additional applications. In this week’s Journal of Renewable and Sustainable Energy, researchers review the latest advances and remaining challenges in PSC technology.

Released:
16-Feb-2018 10:05 AM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    20-Feb-2018 8:00 AM EST

Article ID: 689430

Fancy A Jellyfish Chip?

Biophysical Society

Mathias P. Clausen, a Danish researcher, became intrigued by jellyfish when he bit into the marine delicacy and experienced an unexpected crunch; he decided he wanted to “understand the transformation from soft gel to this crunchy thing.” Clausen and other scientists combined their expertise in biophysics and biochemistry to gain a better understanding of how food preparation affects jellyfish from the inside out. They will present their work during the 62nd Biophysical Society, held Feb. 17-21.

Released:
13-Feb-2018 9:30 AM EST
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BPS-Lorent-asymmetry-membrane.jpg
  • Embargo expired:
    20-Feb-2018 8:00 AM EST

Article ID: 689514

‘Lipid Asymmetry’ Plays Key Role in Activating Immune Cells

Biophysical Society

A cell’s membrane is composed of a bilayer of lipids, and the inside-facing layer is made of different lipids than the outside-facing layer. Because different lipids create membranes with different physical properties, researchers wondered whether different lipid compositions in the bilayer could also lead to different physical properties. They will present their work exploring this “lipid asymmetry” during the 62nd Biophysical Society Meeting, held Feb. 17-21.

Released:
14-Feb-2018 8:05 AM EST
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Article ID: 689807

Gut Reactions to Improve Probiotics

Biophysical Society

Researchers at Stanford University are studying how bacteria living in the gut respond to common changes within their habitat, working with mice. They change the gut environment within the mice, and then measure which bacterial species survive the change and how the gut environment itself has changed. They also study the physiological response of the bacteria -- if they grow faster or slower, or produce different proteins. The work was presented during the Biophysical Society Meeting, held Feb. 17-21.

Released:
20-Feb-2018 7:05 AM EST
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All Journal News, Digestive Disorders, Physics, Local - Maryland, Local - DC Metro, Scientific Meetings

  • Embargo expired:
    19-Feb-2018 8:00 AM EST

Article ID: 689713

An Enzyme’s Evolution from Changing Electric Fields and Resisting Antibiotics

Biophysical Society

Bacteria can produce enzymes that make them resistant to antibiotics; one example is the TEM beta-lactamase enzyme, which enables bacteria to develop a resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics, such as penicillin and cephalosporins. Researchers at Stanford University are studying this area -- how an enzyme changes and becomes antibiotic-resistant -- and will present their work during the Biophysical Society’s 62nd Meeting, held Feb. 17-21, 2018.

Released:
16-Feb-2018 1:05 PM EST
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All Journal News, Drugs and Drug Abuse, Scientific Meetings, Physics, Local - Maryland, Local - DC Metro

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  • Embargo expired:
    19-Feb-2018 8:00 AM EST

Article ID: 689390

Electric Eel-Inspired Device Reaches 110 Volts

Biophysical Society

In an effort to create a power source for future implantable technologies, a team of researchers developed an electric eel-inspired device that produced 110 volts from gels filled with water, called hydrogels. Their results show potential for a soft power source to draw on a biological system’s chemical energy. Anirvan Guha will present the research during the 62nd Biophysical Society Annual Meeting, Feb. 17-21.

Released:
12-Feb-2018 2:05 PM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    18-Feb-2018 8:00 AM EST

Article ID: 689546

Studying Mitosis’ Structure to Understand the Inside of Cancer Cells

Biophysical Society

Cell division is an intricately choreographed ballet of proteins and molecules that divide the cell. During mitosis, microtubule-organizing centers assemble the spindle fibers that separate the copying chromosomes of DNA. While scientists are familiar with MTOCs’ existence and the role they play in cell division, their actual physical structure remains poorly understood. Researchers are now trying to decipher their molecular architecture, and they will present their work during the 62nd Biophysical Society Annual Meeting, held Feb. 17-21.

Released:
14-Feb-2018 11:05 AM EST
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