Press "esc" to clear
Go to Advanced Search

Showing results

110 of 1566
JVSTA355803_Figure_Robotex1.JPG

Article ID: 694692

Robotic Assembly of the World’s Smallest House -- Even A Mite Doesn’t Fit Through the Door!

American Institute of Physics (AIP)

A French nanorobotics team has assembled a new microrobotics system that pushes forward the frontiers of optical nanotechnologies. Combining several existing technologies, the µRobotex nanofactory builds microstructures in a large vacuum chamber and fixes components onto optical fiber tips with nanometer accuracy. The microhouse construction, reported in the Journal of Vacuum Science and Technology A, demonstrates how researchers can advance optical sensing technologies when they manipulate ion guns, electron beams and finely controlled robotic piloting.

Released:
18-May-2018 8:05 AM EDT
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab
Comment
Embargo will expire:
22-May-2018 11:00 AM EDT
Released to reporters:
17-May-2018 9:20 AM EDT

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 22-May-2018 11:00 AM EDT

Hanford.JPG
  • Embargo expired:
    10-May-2018 8:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 693731

Cloaking Devices -- It’s Not Just ‘Star Trek’ Anymore

Acoustical Society of America (ASA)

Scientists are now working to take cloaking devices from the dramatic realm of science fiction and make them real. Amanda D. Hanford, at Pennsylvania State University, is taking the introductory steps to make acoustic ground cloaks. These materials redirect approaching waves around an object without scattering the wave energy, concealing the object from the sound waves. During the 175th ASA Meeting, Hanford will describe the physics behind an underwater acoustic shield designed in her lab.

Released:
30-Apr-2018 1:05 PM EDT
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab
Comment
  • Embargo expired:
    9-May-2018 8:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 693561

From the Mouths of Babes: Infants Really Enjoy Hearing From Their Peers

Acoustical Society of America (ASA)

Sorry, new parents -- even though your infants appreciate your coos, they prefer to hear sounds from their peers -- other babies. Even at the pre-babbling stage, infants recognize vowel-like sounds, but they tend to dwell on these sounds when from the mouths of babes. At the 175th ASA Meeting, researchers will present from a new line of research focusing on one aspect of infant speech development: how babies perceive speech with infant vocal properties.

Released:
26-Apr-2018 3:05 PM EDT
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab
Comment

Social and Behavioral Sciences

ASA_SPRING_2018_ValidatingAuditorySpatial_Stecker-Image4.jpg
  • Embargo expired:
    9-May-2018 8:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 693821

Virtual Reality Technology Opens New Doors of (Spatial) Perception

Acoustical Society of America (ASA)

Locating and discriminating sound sources is extremely complex because the brain must process spatial information from many, sometimes conflicting, cues. Using virtual reality and other immersive technologies, researchers can use new methods to investigate how we make sense of the word with sound. At the 175th ASA Meeting, G. Christopher Stecker will survey his team’s use of virtual reality and augmented auditory reality to study how people use explicit and implicit sound cues.

Released:
1-May-2018 3:05 PM EDT
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab
Comment
ASA_SPRING_2018_UltrasoundCuba_Leighton-AJ_IMAGE1.png
  • Embargo expired:
    9-May-2018 8:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 693567

Ultrasonic Attack is Unlikely, But Incidental Exposure Presents Plenty of Problems

Acoustical Society of America (ASA)

New technologies for mobile devices may use ultrasonic sound waves, and these devices have varying effects on different subsets of the population. Regulation of these technologies is in many ways “the wild west,” according to Timothy Leighton, who wrote a guide for moving forward in today’s new world of ultrasonic exposure. He will describe his work uncovering the strange history and uncertain future of the use of ultrasonic sound waves during the 175th ASA Meeting.

Released:
26-Apr-2018 12:05 PM EDT
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab
Comment
ASA_Elbing1.jpg
  • Embargo expired:
    8-May-2018 8:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 693548

Decoding Tornadoes’ Infrasound Waves

American Institute of Physics (AIP)

Tornado-producing storms can emit infrasound more than an hour before tornadogenesis, which inspired a group of researchers to develop a long-range, passive way of listening in on storms. During the 175th ASA Meeting, Brian Elbing will present his group’s work collecting infrasound measurements from tornadoes to decode information contained in waves about the formation processes and life cycle before potentially devastating storms hit.

Released:
26-Apr-2018 10:10 AM EDT
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab
Comment
  • Embargo expired:
    8-May-2018 8:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 693596

Can Chimpanzee Vocalizations Reveal the Origins of Human Language?

Acoustical Society of America (ASA)

Fossil primates provide important clues about human evolution, but the sounds they made and the soft tissue involved in making those sounds weren’t preserved. So chimpanzees can provide important points of comparison for inferring the sorts of sounds our early ancestors may have made. During the 175th ASA Meeting, Michael Wilson, an associate professor at the University of Minnesota, will present his group’s work searching for similarities between the vocal communications of chimpanzees and humans.

Released:
26-Apr-2018 2:05 PM EDT
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab
Comment
  • Embargo expired:
    8-May-2018 8:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 693636

What Does a ‘Normal’ Voice Sound Like?

Acoustical Society of America (ASA)

Humans communicate their intentions, feelings and desires verbally, so voice disorders can have devastating personal and professional consequences. A perceived voice abnormality may lead to a negative assessment of the speaker’s intelligence, health and personality. During the 175th ASA Meeting, researchers will describe their work on voice perception and what it means for a voice to sound “normal.”

Released:
27-Apr-2018 10:05 AM EDT
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab
Comment
ChildExperienceBinauralStimuli.png
  • Embargo expired:
    8-May-2018 8:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 693905

Synchronizing Cochlear Signals Stimulates Brain to ‘Hear’ in Stereo

Acoustical Society of America (ASA)

Using both ears to hear increases speech recognition and improves sound localization. Ruth Litovsky, at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, wants to bring this advantage to people who use cochlear implants. During the 175th ASA Meeting, Litovsky will present data showing a new technique that synchronizes the cochlear signals that stimulate the brain in a way that is similar to people who can hear normally.

Released:
2-May-2018 1:05 PM EDT
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab
Comment

Showing results

110 of 1566





Chat now!