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Science

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Diamond, Quantum, nitrogen vacancy center, Nanoscale, quantum sensing, High Density, Hitoshi Ishiwata, Makoto Nakajima, Kosuke Tahara, Hayato Ozawa, Takayuki Iwasaki, Mutsuko Hatano, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Applied Physics Letters

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 25-Jul-2017 11:00 AM EDT

Science

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Nanomagnets, skyrmion, Information Storage, topological, electron pulses, Alexander F. Schäffer, Hermann A. Durr, Jamal Berakdar, Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Applied Physics Letters

Pulses of Electrons Manipulate Nanomagnets and Store Information

Skyrmions are a kind of nanomagnet, comprised of a spin-correlated ensemble of electrons acting as a topological magnet on certain microscopic surfaces. The precise properties, like spin orientation, of such nanomagnets can store information. But how might you go about moving or manipulating these nanomagnets at will to store the data you want? New research demonstrates such read/write ability using bursts of electrons, encoding topological energy structures robustly enough for potential data storage applications. The researchers report their work this week in Applied Physics Letters.

Science

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Entropy, information theory, Robotics, Zebrafish, interaction dynamics

Robotics-Based Study Provides Insight Into Predator-Prey Interactions

A research team led by New York University professor Maurizio Porfiri put forth a robotics-based study to control information flow in predator-prey interactions, as well as test the validity of transfer entropy when attempting to understand causal influences of the system. They report their findings this week in the journal Chaos, from AIP Publishing.

Science

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wearables, wearable tech, fitness technologies, Medical Technology, Bioengineering Today, AIP Publishing

Wearable Technology and the Future of a Billion-Dollar Industry

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A feature article published this afternoon in the new, online nonprofit journalism news outlet Bioengineering Today explores the global, billion-dollar industry of wearable fitness and medical technologies, which stands at the crossroads of computing, consumer electronics, exercise culture and human health.

Science

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giant charge reversal, charge inversion, ions, highly charged, opposite charges, Dielectric, Electrolyte, Adsorption, Solvent, Zhi-Yong Wang, Jianzhong Wu, The Journal Of Chemical Physics

Giant Charge Reversal Observed For the First Time

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Charged surfaces submerged in an electrolyte solution can sometimes become oppositely charged. This nonintuitive phenomenon happens when excess counter ions adsorb to the surface. In certain situations, theory predicts that a highly charged surface not only changes sign, but can become more highly charged than the original surface. This is known as giant charge reversal, but remains controversial and has never been observed experimentally. Results reported this week in The Journal of Chemical Physics confirm giant charge reversal for a surface in contact with a trivalent electrolyte solution.

Science

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Droplet, Fluid Dynamics, wettability, Slope, climbing droplets, Hydrophilic, Prabh P. Seerha, Parmod Kumar, Arup K. Das, Sushanta K. Mitra, Indian Institute of TEchnology, York University, PHYSICS OF FLUIDS

Even Droplets Sometimes Take the Stairs

Sometimes, liquid drops don't drop. Instead, they climb. Using computer simulations, researchers have now shown how to induce droplets to climb stairs all by themselves. This stair-climbing behavior could be useful in everything from water treatment and new lab-on-a-chip microfluidic devices, to biochemical processing and medical diagnostic tools. The researchers describe their findings this week in the journal Physics of Fluids.

Science

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Semiconductor, Integrated Circuits, controlled spalling, Gallium Nitride, Thin Film, layer transfer technique, Stephen W. Bedell, Paul Lauro, John A. Ott, Keith E. Fogel, Devendra K. Sadana, IBM Research, Journal of Applied Physics

Thinking Thin Brings New Layering and Thermal Abilities to the Semiconductor Industry

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The concept of a simple technique to remove thin layers from otherwise thick, rigid semiconductor crystals has been actively explored for years. In a significant advance, a research group from IBM successfully applied their new “controlled spalling” layer transfer technique to gallium nitride (GaN) crystals, a prevalent semiconductor material, and created a pathway for producing many layers from a single substrate. They report their work in this week’s Journal of Applied Physics.

Science

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spray cooling, lattice-Botzmann method, microdroplet, Computational Modeling, droplet impingement, Molecular Dynamics, Fluid Mechanics, Mahsa Ebrahim, Alfonso Ortega, Nicolas Delboscy, Mark C.T. Wilson, Jonathan L. Summers, Villanova University, University of Leeds, PHYSICS OF FLUIDS

Simulating Splash at the Microscopic Level

Spray cooling is one of the most promising methods for cooling high heat flow electronics. Two-phase spray cooling, in particular, has been shown to cool heat fluxes orders of magnitude higher than traditional cooling methods but the complex physics of it demands deeper understanding. To tackle this, researchers investigated the basic physics of droplet impingement using a computational approach called the lattice-Botzmann method; they report their work in this week’s Physics of Fluids.

Science

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spider silk, spin, dragline, Synthetic, Biomimetic, Fiber, Torsion, dynamical response, Dabiao Liu, Longteng Yu, Yuming He, Kai Peng, Jie LIu, Juan Guan, D. J. Dunstan, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Hubei Key Laboratory of Engineering Structural Analysis and Safety Assessment, Queen Mary University of London, Hubei University, Beihang University

Strange Silk: Why Rappelling Spiders Don’t Spin Out of Control

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On this week’s Applied Physics Letters, researchers show that unlike human hair, metal wires or synthetic fibers, spider silk partially yields when twisted. This property quickly dissipates the energy that would otherwise send an excited spider spinning on the end of its silk. A greater understanding of how spider silk resists spinning could lead to biomimetic fibers that mimic these properties for potential uses in violin strings, helicopter rescue ladders and parachute cords.

Science

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American Institute of Physics (AIP), Board Of Directors, John Regazzi, Elsevier, Long Island University

AIP Names Information Systems Expert John Regazzi as Board Chair

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The American Institute of Physics (AIP) announced today that its Board of Directors has selected information systems expert John Regazzi, Ph.D., as its new chair. He begins his appointment September 10, 2017 and will preside at the board meeting in November.







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