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Article ID: 693716

Genomicist Jeramiah Smith Delivers 3rd Annual NIGMS Early Career Investigator Lecture

NIH, National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS)

In an archived webcast, University of Kentucky genomicist Jeramiah Smith describes the sea lamprey’s innovative strategy for avoiding cancer: shedding 20 percent of its genome following development. He also talks with NIGMS director Jon Lorsch about the challenges faced by early career scientists.

Released:
30-Apr-2018 5:00 PM EDT
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Article ID: 693440

The Changing Needs of a Cell: No Membrane? No Problem!

NIH, National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS)

While the vast majority of organelles in a cell are insulated by membranes, scientists are finding more and more membrane-less organelles that form as liquid droplets nested inside of each other.

Released:
30-Apr-2018 9:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 693447

“Selfish” Gene Enhances Own Transmission at Expense of Organism’s Fertility

NIH, National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS)

Researchers recently identified a new “selfish” gene, wtf4, that encodes a toxin and an antitoxin in an effort to ensure the gene’s own transmission by killing off reproductive cells lacking the gene.

Released:
30-Apr-2018 9:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 693431

Feeling Out Bacteria’s Sense of Touch

NIH, National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS)

Scientists have learned how bacteria use their sense of touch to initiate infection and trigger the formation of harmful biofilms.

Released:
27-Apr-2018 9:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 693429

Quicker Sepsis Treatment Saves Lives: Q & A With Sepsis Researcher Christopher Seymour

NIH, National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS)

Physician scientist Christopher Seymour talks about his experience treating sepsis patients and his new study indicating that quicker treatment improves survival odds.

Released:
27-Apr-2018 9:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 693426

Genomic Gymnastics of a Single-Celled Ciliate and How It Relates to Humans

NIH, National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS)

Molecular Biologist Laura Landweber describes the bizarre sex lives of the single-celled critter she studies and how it can inform cancer research.

Released:
26-Apr-2018 9:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 693425

Cellular Footprints: Tracing How Cells Move

NIH, National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS)

Scientists have developed novel ways to study how and why cells move in their search for treatments of bacterial infection and diseases such as cancer.

Released:
26-Apr-2018 9:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 692891

Ancient Bloodsuckers, Disposable Genes, and What It All Means

NIH, National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS)

Tune in today for a webcast of the 3rd annual NIGMS Director’s Early-Career Investigator Lecture where Dr. Jeramiah Smith, an assistant professor at the University of Kentucky, will describe how his research on the sea lamprey is shedding light on cancer biology, tissue regeneration, and vertebrate evolution.

Released:
17-Apr-2018 9:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 692613

The Skull’s Petrous Bone and What It Can Tell Us About Ancient Humans: Q & A with Genetic Archaeologist David Reich

NIH, National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS)

Genetic archaeologist David Reich discusses how DNA retrieved from inch-long bone in the skull has accelerated our understanding of ancient humans.

Released:
12-Apr-2018 9:00 AM EDT
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engineered-cell.png

Article ID: 692524

Cellular Footprints: Tracing How Cells Move

NIH, National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS)

Scientists have developed novel ways to study how and why cells move in their search for treatments of bacterial infection and diseases such as cancer.

Released:
11-Apr-2018 9:00 AM EDT
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