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Sepsis: The Body’s Deadly Response to Infection

Although not as well-known as other medical conditions, sepsis kills more people in the United States than AIDS, breast cancer, or prostate cancer combined. Sepsis is body-wide inflammation, usually triggered by an overwhelming immune response to infection. Though doctors and medical staff are well-aware of the condition—it is involved in 1 in 10 hospital deaths—the condition is notoriously hard to diagnose. In this video, sepsis expert Sarah Dunsmore, a program director with the National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS), describes what sepsis is and how to recognize it, what kinds of patients are most at risk, and what NIGMS is doing to reduce the impact of this deadly condition.

Medicine

Science

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Wolbachia, Mosquito Borne Disease, zika, Drosophila

Flipping the Switch on Controlling Disease-Carrying Insects

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Authorities in Florida and Brazil recently released thousands of mosquitoes infected with a bacterium called Wolbachia in an effort to curb Zika outbreaks. Find out how Wolbachia neutralizes insects.

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Life

Education

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Pi Day, Math and science

On Pi Day, Computational Biologists Share What They Love About Math

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In honor of Pi Day, we asked several biomedical researchers in the field of computational biology to tell us why they love math and how they use it in their research.

Medicine

Science

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cellular imaging, Actin, Cancer

Heart-Shaped Cells

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The cellular skeleton protein actin can bind cells together, and also play a number of roles in cancer’s invasion into new tissues in the body.

Medicine

Science

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Chemistry, Biochemistry, zinc, Fertilisation, Fertility, Bacterial Infection

Interview with a Scientist: Thomas O’Halloran, Metal Maestro

In a video interview, Thomas O’Halloran discusses the roles of metals in the body with a focus on how zinc regulates egg cell maturation and fertilization.

Medicine

Science

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Cell Biology, Electron Microscopy, Holiday, endosome

Cool Image: Adding Color to the Gray World of Electron Microscopy

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While it may look like a pine wreath dotted with crimson berries, this holiday-themed image is in fact one of the world’s first color electron micrographs.

Medicine

Science

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Genome, lipidome, glycome, Glycobiology, Genomics, Glycomics, omics

There’s an “Ome” for That

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The genome was just the beginning. Rapid advances in technology and computational tools are allowing researchers to categorize many aspects of the biological world.

Medicine

Science

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Antibiotic Resistance, scientist profile, Profile, Microbiome, Drug Resistant Bacteria, Gut commensal microbiota

The Irresistible Resistome: How Infant Diapers Might Help Combat Antibiotic Resistance (Sort of)

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Biochemist Gautam Dantas inspects what’s deposited on infant diapers for clues about antibiotic resistance.

Medicine

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NIH, Venom, Spider, Halloween, pain, Evolution, venome, Antivenom

Exploring the Evolution of Spider Venom to Improve Human Health

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More than 46,000 species of spiders creepy crawl across the globe. Each one produces a venom composed of an average of 500 distinct toxins, putting the conservative estimate of unique venom compounds at more than 22 million. Researchers are studying these toxins to increase our understanding of the evolution of spider venom and contribute to the development of new medicines, anti-venoms and research tools.

Medicine

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Viruses, Cancer, DNA, Evolutionary Biology, NIH, endogenous retroviruses

Our Complicated Relationship with Viruses

Nearly 10 percent of the human genome is made of bits of virus DNA. For the most part, this viral DNA is not harmful. In some cases, NIH-funded scientists are finding, it actually has a beneficial impact.







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