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Article ID: 699114

More Protein after Weight Loss May Reduce Fatty Liver Disease

American Physiological Society (APS)

Increasing the amount of protein in the diet may reduce the liver’s fat content and lower the risk of diabetes in people with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). The study is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology—Endocrinology and Metabolism.

Released:
16-Aug-2018 1:45 PM EDT
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Article ID: 698759

Estrogen May Protect Against Depression after Heart Attack

American Physiological Society (APS)

Estrogen may protect against heart failure-related depression by preventing the production of inflammation-causing chemicals in the brain. The study is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology—Heart and Circulatory Physiology.

Released:
9-Aug-2018 11:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 698512

Blocking Digestive Hormone May Prevent Diet-Induced Pancreatic Cancer

American Physiological Society (APS)

A high-fat diet may promote the growth of pancreatic cancer independent of obesity because of the interaction between dietary fat and cholecystokinin (CCK), a digestive hormone. In addition, blocking CCK may help prevent the spread of pancreatic tumors to other areas of the body (metastases).

Released:
2-Aug-2018 5:00 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    31-Jul-2018 7:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 698278

Heat Therapy Boosts Mitochondrial Function in Muscles

American Physiological Society (APS)

A new study finds that long-term heat therapy may increase mitochondrial function in the muscles. The discovery could lead to new treatments for people with chronic illness or disease. The study—the first of its kind in humans—is published ahead of print in the Journal of Applied Physiology.

Released:
30-Jul-2018 5:00 PM EDT
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Article ID: 697659

Diabetes during Pregnancy May Increase Baby’s Heart Disease Risk

American Physiological Society (APS)

Gestational diabetes may increase the risk of blood vessel dysfunction and heart disease in offspring by altering a smooth muscle protein responsible for blood vessel network formation. Understanding of the protein’s function in fetal cells may improve early detection of disease in children. The study is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology—Cell Physiology.

Released:
19-Jul-2018 3:00 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    12-Jul-2018 7:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 697318

Smell Receptors in the Body Could Help Sniff Out Disease

American Physiological Society (APS)

A review of more than 200 studies reveals that olfactory receptors—proteins that bind to odors that aid the sense of smell—perform a wide range of mostly unknown functions outside the nose. The function of extra-nasal olfactory receptors has the potential to be used in the diagnosis and treatment of health conditions such as cancer.

Released:
11-Jul-2018 4:00 PM EDT
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Article ID: 696958

Stem Cell Transplant Drug May Protect against Smoke-related COPD Symptoms

American Physiological Society (APS)

A drug used in stem cell therapy to treat certain cancers may also protect against cigarette smoke-induced lung injury. The study, published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology—Lung Cellular and Molecular Physiology, was chosen as an APSselect article for July.

Released:
5-Jul-2018 7:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 696810

Obesity + Aging Linked to Alzheimer’s Markers in the Brain

American Physiological Society (APS)

A new study suggests that when a high-fat, high-sugar diet that leads to obesity is paired with normal aging, it may contribute to the development of Alzheimer’s disease. In addition, researchers discovered that certain areas of the brain respond differently to risk factors associated with Alzheimer’s. The study is published in Physiological Reports.

Released:
28-Jun-2018 2:30 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    21-Jun-2018 5:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 696405

Bringing Study Abroad to Commuters: A Case Study at the University of New Hampshire at Manchester

American Physiological Society (APS)

Studying abroad can impart a number of valuable, lifelong skills in students, including improved foreign language skills, appreciation for other cultures and, importantly, access to unique learning opportunities only available in certain countries and settings. However, less than 10 percent of U.S. college students participate in study abroad experiences. The cost of these experiences remains a major impediment to many students. As part of the American Physiological Society’s (APS’s) Institute on Teaching and Learning in Madison, Wis., Patricia A. Halpin, PhD, will present a case study of a pilot program that aimed to provide more opportunities for students at the University of New Hampshire at Manchester to study abroad.

Released:
20-Jun-2018 3:00 PM EDT
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Education

  • Embargo expired:
    21-Jun-2018 5:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 696408

‘Exam Roulette’ Could Quell Essay-induced Anxiety

American Physiological Society (APS)

For many students, essay tests are a source of dread and anxiety. But for professors, these tests provide an excellent way to assess a student’s depth of knowledge and critical-thinking skills. At the American Physiological Society’s (APS’s) Institute on Teaching and Learning in Madison, Wis., Andrew Petzold, PhD, of the University of Minnesota Rochester Center for Learning Innovation, will discuss how a game of chance can lead to increased student preparation and motivation.

Released:
20-Jun-2018 3:00 PM EDT
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Education


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