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Electron Microscopy, Ames Laboratory, Magnetotactic Bacteria

Ames Laboratory-Led Research Team Maps Magnetic Fields of Bacterial Cells and Nano-Objects for the First Time

A research team led by a scientist from the U.S. Department of Energy’s Ames Laboratory has demonstrated for the first time that the magnetic fields of bacterial cells and magnetic nano-objects in liquid can be studied at high resolution using electron microscopy.

Science

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Graphite, Graphene, 2D layered materials, Metamaterial

Getting Under Graphite’s Skin:

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Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Ames Laboratory have discovered a new process to sheathe metal under a single layer of graphite which may lead to new and better-controlled properties for these types of materials.

Science

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Magnetoresistance, condensed matter physics, Physics

Old Rules Apply in Explaining Extremely Large Magnetoresistance

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Physicists at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Ames Laboratory compared similar materials and returned to a long-established rule of electron movement in their quest to explain the phenomenon of extremely large magnetoresistance (XMR).

Science

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material sciences, Ames Laboratory, solar cell development, rare earth materials, Electron Microscopy, Raman Spectroscopy

Addition of Tin Boosts Nanoparticle’s Photoluminescence

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Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Ames Laboratory have developed germanium nanoparticles with improved photoluminescence, making them potentially better materials for solar cells and imaging probes. The research team found that by adding tin to the nanoparticle’s germanium core, its lattice structure better matched the lattice structure of the cadmium-sulfide coating which allows the particles to absorb more light.

Science

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Catalysis & energy conversion, 3D printing materials, additive manufacturing, Polymers, Ames Laboratory

One-Step 3D Printing of Catalysts Developed at Ames Laboratory

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The U.S. Department of Energy’s Ames Laboratory has developed a 3D printing process that creates a chemically active catalytic object in a single step, opening the door to more efficient ways to produce catalysts for complex chemical reactions in a wide scope of industries.

Science

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Structural Materials, Physics, condensed matter and materials, Ames Laboratory, Uconn, Superconductor, shape memory materials

Ames Laboratory, UConn Discover Superconductor with Bounce

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The U.S. Department of Energy’s Ames Laboratory has discovered extreme “bounce,” or super-elastic shape-memory properties in a material that could be applied for use as an actuator in the harshest of conditions, such as outer space, and might be the first in a whole new class of shape memory materials.

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Biomass

Surrounded by Potential: New Science in Converting Biomass

To take full advantage of biomass, lignin needs to be processed into usable components along with the plant cellulose. Ames Laboratory scientists are working to develop a method to deconstruct lignin in a way that is economically feasible and into stable, readily useful components.

Science

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magnet recycling, Ames Laboratory, Critical Materials Institute, Rare Earth Magnets, Rare Earth Material, rare earth recovery, Patent

Critical Materials Institute Develops New Acid-Free Magnet Recycling Process

A new rare-earth magnet recycling process developed by researchers at the Critical Materials Institute (CMI) dissolves magnets in an acid-free solution and recovers high purity rare earth elements.

Science

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Graphene, 2D layered materials, 2d electronics, Surface & interface studies, Ames Laboratory

Ames Laboratory Scientists Move Graphene Closer to Transistor Applications

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Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Ames Laboratory were able to successfully manipulate the electronic structure of graphene, which may enable the fabrication of graphene transistors-- faster and more reliable than existing silicon-based transistors.

Science

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Rare Earth Magnets, rare earth materials, Rare Earths, Critical Materials Institute, Ames Laboratory, Idaho National Laboratory

Critical Materials Institute Manufactures Magnets Entirely From U.S.-Sourced Rare Earths

The Critical Materials Institute, a U.S. Department of Energy Innovation Hub, has fabricated magnets made entirely of domestically sourced and refined rare-earth metals.







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