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Article ID: 696480

Ames Laboratory’s Ke Earns DOE Early Career Research Award

Ames Laboratory

Ames Laboratory scientist Liqin Ke is one of 30 scientists from the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) national laboratories to be selected for funding as part of the DOE’s Early Career Research Program.

Released:
21-Jun-2018 2:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 694598

Two Cool: A Pair of Patents Filed on Breakthrough Materials for Next-Gen Refrigerators

Ames Laboratory

Scientists at the research consortium CaloriCool® are closer than ever to the materials needed for a new type of refrigeration technology that is markedly more energy efficient than current gas compression systems.

Released:
15-May-2018 12:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 694280

Revealing the Mysteries of Superconductors: Ames Lab’s New Scope Takes a Closer Look

Ames Laboratory

The U.S. Department of Energy’s Ames Laboratory has successfully demonstrated that a new type of optical magnetometer, the NV magnetoscope, can map a unique feature of superconductive materials that along with zero resistance defines the superconductivity itself.

Released:
9-May-2018 1:30 PM EDT
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Article ID: 693799

Ames Lab Takes the Guesswork Out of Discovering New High-Entropy Alloys

Ames Laboratory

The U.S. Department of Energy’s Ames Laboratory has developed a method of computational analysis that can help predict the composition and properties of as-yet unmade high performance alloys.

Released:
1-May-2018 12:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 693150

Rare Earth Magnet Recycling Is a Grind. This New Process Takes a Simpler Approach

Ames Laboratory

A new recycling process developed at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Critical Materials Institute (CMI) turns discarded hard disk drive (HDD) magnets into new magnet material in a few steps, and tackles both the economic and environmental issues typically associated with mining e-waste for valuable materials.

Released:
19-Apr-2018 11:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 692621

CMI Expands Research in Tech Metals as Rapid Growth in Electric Vehicles Drives Demand for Lithium, Cobalt

Ames Laboratory

As increasing consumer interest in electric vehicles drives the demand for supplies of lithium and cobalt (ingredients in lithium-ion batteries), the Critical Materials Institute will begin new efforts this July to maximize the efficient processing, use, and recycling of those elements.

Released:
11-Apr-2018 3:30 PM EDT
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Article ID: 691190

Iowa Cornfields Could Play a Role in Recycling Old Electronics

Ames Laboratory

A new biochemical leaching process has been developed that uses corn stover as feedstock, and recovers valuable rare earth metals from electronic waste.

Released:
15-Mar-2018 1:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 689767

Seeing the Future of New Energy Materials

Ames Laboratory

Ames Laboratory has recently received new funding to study energy materials by developing and applying new techniques in solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy.

Released:
19-Feb-2018 11:05 AM EST
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Article ID: 689468

Missing Link to Novel Superconductivity Revealed at Ames Laboratory

Ames Laboratory

Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Ames Laboratory have discovered a state of magnetism that may be the missing link to understanding the relationship between magnetism and unconventional superconductivity.

Released:
13-Feb-2018 12:05 PM EST
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Article ID: 687204

Ames Laboratory-Led Research Team Maps Magnetic Fields of Bacterial Cells and Nano-Objects for the First Time

Ames Laboratory

A research team led by a scientist from the U.S. Department of Energy’s Ames Laboratory has demonstrated for the first time that the magnetic fields of bacterial cells and magnetic nano-objects in liquid can be studied at high resolution using electron microscopy.

Released:
21-Dec-2017 1:05 PM EST
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