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Science

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Appalachia, Opioid, Reseach, Hepatitis, HIV, Overdose, Public Health, Research

UK Researchers Take Community Approach in Battling Opioid Epidemic in Eastern Kentucky

With a $1.16 million cooperative agreement from the CDC, NIDA, SAMHSA and the Appalachian Regional Commission, April Young, researcher with the University of Kentucky College of Public Health and Center on Drug and Alcohol Research, will partner with communities to conduct research to address the opioid epidemic in 12 Eastern Kentucky counties.

Science

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Cell Biology, Par-4, Cancer

New Study Discovers "Killer Peptide" That Helps Eliminate Resistant Cancer Cells

A new study by University of Kentucky Markey Cancer Center researchers shows that when therapy-sensitive cancer cells die, they release a "killer peptide" that can eliminate therapy-resistant cells.

Medicine

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Massage, Massage Therapy, MUSCLE ATROPHY, Protein Synthesis, Hypertrophy

Can Massaging One Leg Confer Benefit to the Other?

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Two University of Kentucky researchers have been awarded a $2.1 million, five-year grant to study how massage might aid in the recovery of muscle mass and reduce muscle atrophy, with implications for the elderly, the ill, and those recovering from injury.

Science

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Wheat, mold, Spores, Agriculture, Plant Sciences, Crops

UK’s Farman Is Co-Author of Important Wheat Disease Study

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A University of Kentucky plant pathologist is part of an international team of researchers who have uncovered an important link to a disease which left unchecked could prove devastating to wheat.

Science

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Cancer, Lung Cancer, pharmac

Blocking Cancer — Scientists Find New Way to Combat Disease

A compound developed by Dean Kip Guy’s lab of UK College of Pharmacy, with research that began at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, now shows promise for blocking cancer-causing proteins on a cellular level.

Science

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UK Chemistry Researchers Develop Catalyst that Mimics the Z-Scheme of Photosynthesis

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Published in Applied Catalysis B: Environmental, the study demonstrates a process with great potential for developing technologies for reducing CO2 levels.

Science

Life

Education

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Education, Science, graduate degree, Higher Education, Career Advice, postdoctural

New Book by UK Faculty Member Guides STEM Students in Career Planning

A new book co-written by Nathan Vanderford, University of Kentucky assistant professor in the Department of Toxicology and Cancer Biology, guides STEM graduate and postdoctoral students in their career planning by evaluating goals and finding the steps to be taken to achieve them.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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diaphragmatic breathing, Orofacial Pain, Psychology, Violence Against Women, Chronic Pain, smartphone app

University of Kentucky Researchers Help Victims of Violence Manage Chronic Pain with Mobile App for Breathing Techniques

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By providing UK Orofacial Pain Clinic patients with a smartphone application that teaches diaphragmatic breathing, a team from the UK Center for Research on Violence Against Women hypothesizes victims of sexual and physical violence will learn to regulate their body’s sympathetic (flight or fight) tone and manage their pain.

Science

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Regeneration, Macrophage, Tissue Regeneration, African spiny mouse, Immune Cells, scar tissue, University Of Kentucky, human regenerative medicine

UK Researchers Identify Macrophages as Key Factor for Regeneration in Mammals

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The team’s findings, published today in eLife, shed light on how immune cells might be harnessed to someday help stimulate tissue regeneration in humans.

Science

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hafnia, hafnium dioxide, silicon dioxide, Materials (Superconductors/Semiconductors), University Of Kentucky, Texas A&M, Nature Communications

Hafnia Dons a New Face

As computer chips become smaller, faster and more powerful, their insulating layers must also be much more robust -- currently a limiting factor for semiconductor technology. A collaborative University of Kentucky-Texas A&M University research team says this new phase of hafnia is an order of magnitude better at withstanding applied fields.







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