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Penn Study Identifies New Malaria Parasites in Wild Bonobos

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Malaria parasites, although widespread among wild chimpanzees and gorillas, have not been detected in bonobos, a chimp cousin. Although the researchers saw evidence of a new malaria species in bonobos, it was limited to one small area of their range. This work helps the hunt for biological loopholes to potentially exploit the life history of ape pathogens to better understand how they cross over to humans.

Medicine

Science

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Health, Medicine, Gastroenterology, Biostatistics

Penn Medicine’s Anil K. Rustgi and Hongzhe Li Named 2017 AAAS Fellows

  PHILADELPHIA—Anil K. Rustgi, MD, chief of the division of Gastroenterology and T. Grier Miller Professor of Medicine and Genetics, and Hongzhe Li, PhD, a professor of biostatistics in Biostatistics and Epidemiology, both at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, have been named fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the world’s largest general scientific society and publisher of the journal Science.

Medicine

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Premature Birth, Women's Health, human interest, Penn Medicine, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Parenting, Obstetrics And Gynecology, Neonatology, newborn health, neonatal intensive care

Preemies 4 Prevention

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Sage Snyder and Julia Dickman are sophomores in high school. They do all the normal things high schoolers do – hang out with their friends, go shopping, and play sports after school. But for these two, the buck doesn’t stop there. Sage and Julia were both born prematurely. They spent the first several months of their lives in intensive care, and over the years have continued to experience the lasting effects of premature birth. Together with other teens who were born premature, Sage and Julia founded Preemies 4 Prevention, an effort that officially launches this month and works to raise awareness of the devastating effects of preterm birth and support for research at Penn’s March of Dimes Prematurity Research Center.

Medicine

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Tobacco, Great American Smoke Out, Great American Smokeout, Cancer, Smoking Cessation, Smoking

Helping Cancer Patients Quit Tobacco for Good

A new treatment program that combines the power of technology with tried and true methods to help cancer patients overcome their addiction to tobacco is ready to enroll its first patients at Penn Medicine’s Abramson Cancer Center. As part of the program, doctors are alerted about a patient’s tobacco use through the electronic medical record. At that point, an automated referral is made for the patient to Penn’s Tobacco Use Treatment Service (TUTS), which then directly provides patients with state-of-the-science tobacco use treatment in an effort to get them to quit for good and assist with their medical treatment and recovery.

Medicine

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Biostatistics, Epidemiology, Public Health

Birthing New Findings

A team led by Penn Medicine’s Mary Regina Boland, PhD, an assistant professor of Informatics in Biostatistics, Epidemiology and Informatics, looked at previously documented associations between specific diseases and being born at a certain time of the year, probing deeper to pinpoint the links between them.

Medicine

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Microbiome, Crohn's Diesease, Gastroenterology, bacterial enzyme

A Clean Slate: Engineering the Gut Microbiome with “Good” Bacteria May Help Treat Crohn’s Disease

Penn Medicine researchers have singled out a bacterial enzyme behind an imbalance in the gut microbiome linked to Crohn’s disease. The new study, published online this week in Science Translational Medicine, suggests that wiping out a significant portion of the bacteria in the gut microbiome, and then re-introducing a certain type of “good” bacteria that lacks this enzyme, known as urease, may be an effective approach to better treat these diseases.

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Psoriasis, Diabetes, Type 2 Diabetes, body surface area

Psoriasis Severity Linked to Increased Risk of Type 2 Diabetes

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People with psoriasis are at a higher risk to develop type 2 diabetes than those without psoriasis, and the risk increases dramatically based on the severity of the disease. Researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania found people with psoriasis that covers 10 percent of their body or more are 64 percent more likely to develop diabetes than those without psoriasis, independent of traditional risk factors such as body weight. Applying the study’s findings to the number of people who have psoriasis worldwide would equate to 125,650 new cases of diabetes attributable to psoriasis per year.

Medicine

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Penn Medicine, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Sudden Cardiac Arrest, Bystander CPR, Cardiology, Emergency Medicine, American Heart Association, AHA Scientific Sessions

Penn Study Finds Men Are More Likely To Receive CPR in Public than Women

When it comes to your likelihood of receiving bystander CPR if you experience a Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) in public, it turns out your gender may play a lifesaving role. According to a new study from researchers in the Center for Resuscitation Science at Penn Medicine, which is being presented at the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions 2017, men are more likely to receive bystander CPR in public than women.

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Video of Blood Clot Contraction Reveals How Platelets Naturally Form Unobtrusive Clots

The first view of the physical mechanism of how a blood clot contracts at the level of individual platelets is giving researchers a new look at a natural process that is part of blood clotting. The team describes how specialized proteins in platelets cause clots to shrink in size.

Medicine

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Women's Health, Transplant, vascularized composite allotransplantation , VCA, MRKH syndrome, Obstetrics & Gynecology, Fertility, Penn Medicine, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Infertility, Clinical Trial

Paving a New Path to Parenthood: Penn Medicine Launches First Clinical Trial for Uterine Transplant in the Northeast

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Penn Medicine will conduct the Northeast’s first clinical trial of uterine transplants, to provide women with Uterine Factor Infertility (UFI) - an irreversible form of female infertility that affects as many as 5 percent of women worldwide and 50,000 women in the United States - with a new path to parenthood.







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