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Medicine

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Radiation, Cancer, Radiation Oncolgy

Penn First in World to Treat Patient with New Radiation Technology

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Doctors at Penn Medicine have become the first in the world to treat a patient with a new treatment platform designed to streamline the way therapeutic radiation is delivered to cancer patients.

Medicine

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Mtor, mTOR inhibitors, Autophagy, PPT1

Penn Researchers Identify New Target, Develop New Drug for Cancer Therapies

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Opening up a new pathway to fight cancer, researchers at the University of Pennsylvania have found a way to target an enzyme that is crucial to tumor growth while also blocking the mechanism that has made past attempts to target that enzyme resistant to treatment. Researchers were able to use this finding to develop a drug that successfully inhibits tumor growth of melanoma as well as pancreatic and colorectal cancer in mice.

Medicine

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Health, Medicine, Sleep, Depression

Sleep Deprivation Is an Effective Anti-Depressant for Nearly Half of Depressed Patients

Sleep deprivation – typically administered in controlled, inpatient settings – rapidly reduces symptoms of depression in roughly half of depression patients, according the first meta-analysis on the subject in nearly 30 years, from researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.

Medicine

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Penn Medicine, American Heart Association, Cardiology, Heart Health

The American Heart Association Partners with Penn Medicine for Three Year Healthy Living Campaign

Today in Philadelphia, Penn Medicine has deepened its commitment to the American Heart Association by announcing a three-year pledge as the market’s first ever Life is Why sponsor. The American Heart Association and Penn Medicine are dedicated to creating a culture of health in Philadelphia by providing local and regional communities with education and resources that advance health and wellness.

Medicine

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DACA, Health Policy, Mental Health, Public Health, Penn Medicine

Ending DACA Could Have Dire Public Health Consequences

The pending termination of DACA may reverse these mental health benefits for the 800,000 DACA beneficiaries, and trigger a public health crisis, according to an essay in the New England Journal of Medicine, co-authored by Atheendar. S. Venkataramani, MD, PhD, an assistant professor of medical ethics and health policy at Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.

Medicine

Science

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How Does a Cell Maintain its Identity During Replication?

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Prior to cell division, chromosomes are seemingly a jumbled mess. Researchers have long assumed that genes become “silent” during cell division, not being transcribed into proteins or regulatory molecules. This has left open the question of how genes get properly re-activated after cell division. Now, researchers have found that gene expression actually continues during cell replication.

Medicine

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Pancreas Cancer

Gastroenterology Professor Appointed Director of Penn Pancreatic Cancer Research Center

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Ben Z. Stanger, MD, PhD, an associate professor of Gastroenterology, has been appointed director of the Penn Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, which includes a multidisciplinary team of pancreatic cancer experts who care for patients and conduct research on the causes and possible prevention and cure of the disease.

Medicine

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Trauma, traumatic brain injury (TBI), Penn Medicine, Heparin, Blood Thinners, Clinical Trial

Penn Study Shows Modified Blood Thinner Reduces the Impact of Traumatic Brain Injury in Mice

A chemically modified version of the common blood thinner heparin may be the first promising method of preventing the harmful cascade of destruction to brain tissue that commonly follows traumatic brain injury (TBI), according to new research findings. Though there is currently no drug therapy to prevent the repercussions that can occur in the days and weeks after TBI, researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania showed that mice treated with a modified version of heparin with very low coagulant activity (known as 2-O, 3-O desulfated heparin, ODSH or CX-01) had less brain swelling and inflammation, and less evidence of brain damage, compared to mice that received saline.

Medicine

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Penn Medicine, Renal and Kidney, Kidney Stones

CHOP and Penn Medicine Join New Research Network to Reduce Kidney Stone Risk

Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) and the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania have joined together as a single site within the Urinary Stone Disease Research Network (USDRN), which was launched by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases of the NIH. In total, five sites will collaborate in this nationwide network as it launches a randomized clinical trial, the Prevention of Urinary Stones with Hydration (PUSH) study.

Medicine

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Ophthalmology, Neurology, FTD, Frontotemporal Dementia, Alzheimer Disease & Associated Disorders, ALS, Lewy Body Dementia, Retina

Eye Changes May Signal Frontotemporal Lobe Degeneration

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Frontotemporal degeneration (FTD) is a progressive neurodegenerative condition that is present in tens of thousands of Americans, but is often difficult to diagnose accurately. Now in a study published this week online ahead of print in Neurology, researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania have found evidence that a simple eye exam and retinal imaging test may help improve that accuracy.







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