Press "esc" to clear
Go to Advanced Search

Showing results

110 of 1809
  • Embargo expired:
    23-May-2018 5:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 694817

Electronic Health Records Fail Because They are Merely Digital Remakes of Paper Charts

Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Writing in a new Perspective published in the New England Journal of Medicine, researchers from Penn Medicine’s Center for Health Care Innovation argue that Electronic Health Records should be restructured from mere digital remakes of their old pen and paper ancestors into platforms that allow doctors to “subscribe” to their patients’ clinical information to receive real-time updates when an action is required, similar to social media feeds and notifications.

Released:
18-May-2018 12:05 PM EDT
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab
Comment
  • Embargo expired:
    23-May-2018 5:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 694758

In Helping Smokers Quit, Cash is King, E-cigarettes Strike Out

Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Free smoking cessation aids, such as nicotine patches and chewing gum, are a staple of many corporate wellness programs aimed at encouraging employees to kick the habit. But, new research shows that merely offering such aids for free does not help employees quit, whereas supplementing them with financial incentives is three times more effective. The study also provides the first large-scale evidence that offering e-cigarettes to known smokers is not effective at helping smokers stay smoke-free.

Released:
21-May-2018 1:00 PM EDT
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab
Comment

Article ID: 694984

Social Media Usage Linked to Underage Drinking

Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Penn Medicine researchers found a statistically significant relationship between teen and young adult alcohol related social media engagement and both alcohol consumption and alcohol-related problems.

Released:
23-May-2018 8:05 AM EDT
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab
Comment

Article ID: 694978

Penn Researchers Identify Cellular Source of Molecule Implicated in Nasal Polyps, Asthma Attacks

Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

A new discovery about how the immune system responds to common sinus infections and asthma could explain why patients develop these issues in the first place and ultimately may lead to improved targeted therapies.

Released:
23-May-2018 8:05 AM EDT
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab
Comment
  • Embargo expired:
    22-May-2018 12:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 694869

Future Doctors Take to the Streets to Address Real-Life Problems at the Root of Poor Health

Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Medical students seldom learn much about the real-life problems (hunger, joblessness, addiction) their patients face outside the clinic walls. Yet, these problems are at the root of poor health in many low-income communities. A new article published today in the Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved describes a new approach to educating medical students about the real world. The course, developed by the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, apprentices medical students to community health workers (CHWs) in inner city Philadelphia. CHWs are trusted laypeople who come from the local community, hired and trained by healthcare organizations to support high-risk patients.

Released:
21-May-2018 11:00 AM EDT
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab
Comment

Article ID: 694838

Dogs Born in the Summertime More Likely to Suffer Heart Disease

Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Dogs born June through August are at higher risk of heart disease than those born other months, rising in July to 74 percent higher risk, according to a study published this week in Scientific Reports from researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. A correlation to outdoor air pollution may be the culprit.

Released:
18-May-2018 4:30 PM EDT
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab
Comment

Article ID: 694825

Food [Log] for Thought

Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

In January, Philadelphia magazine’s Be Well Philly blog rolled out the “Sweat Diaries,” what they’ve described as a “look at the time, energy, and money people invest in pursuit of a healthy lifestyle in Philly.” So far I’ve read about a woman training for an Ironman while following a vegan diet, a gym marketer who practices physical and mental health, and a full-time Barre, Yoga, and Pilates instructor who’s career is built on staying fit. While the “Sweat Diaries” seem to shine the spotlight on those who work in the fitness and nutrition fields—presumably because folks (myself included) want to know what it takes to look and feel fit ever day—I was left wondering what the more “average” person might have to say about their food intake and fitness, particularly here in Philadelphia.

Released:
18-May-2018 1:05 PM EDT
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab
Comment
SeverePsoriasis.jpg
  • Embargo expired:
    18-May-2018 5:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 694736

Humira Does Not Improve Aortic Vascular Inflammation in Psoriasis Patients

Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

An antibody used to treat the skin disease psoriasis and other chronic autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and inflammatory bowel disease has no effect on aortic inflammation – a key marker of future risk of major cardiovascular events – unlike other antibodies that target different aspects of the immune system.

Released:
17-May-2018 10:00 AM EDT
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab
Comment

Article ID: 694770

Body and Mind: Adjusting to Normal Life After Cancer Treatment

Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Cancer, like so many other overwhelming or life-altering situations, can really stick with a person. For many, the end of treatment is met with a flood of emotions that can make it difficult to get back to normal life. Learning how to recognize and live with a cancer diagnosis is a struggle that can last for years even after being given a clean bill of health. For Penn patient Catherine Hagele, the end of treatment was simply the end of one chapter in her journey, and the beginning of another.

Released:
17-May-2018 3:00 PM EDT
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab
Comment

Article ID: 694746

Ovarian Cancer Drug Shows Promise in Pancreatic Cancer Patients with BRCA Mutation

Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

A targeted therapy that has shown its power in fighting ovarian cancer in women including those with BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations may also help patients with aggressive pancreatic cancer who harbor these mutations and have few or no other treatment options. An international team of researchers led by the Perelman School of Medicine and the Basser Center for BRCA at the University of Pennsylvania reported their findings this week in JCO Precision Oncology.

Released:
17-May-2018 10:05 AM EDT
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab
Comment

Showing results

110 of 1809





Chat now!