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  • Embargo expired:
    22-May-2018 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 694921

Surveillance Intensity Not Associated with Earlier Detection of Recurrence or Improved Survival in Colorectal Cancer Patients

University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

A national retrospective study led by researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center found no association between intensity of post-treatment surveillance and detection of recurrence or overall survival (OS) in patients with stage I, II or III colorectal cancer (CRC). Published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, the study is the largest of surveillance intensity in CRC ever conducted.

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22-May-2018 10:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 694499

New Approach to Cancer Research Aims to Accelerate Studies and Reduce Cost

University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

A new model for improving how clinical trials are developed and conducted by bringing together academic cancer experts and pharmaceutical companies is being tested by research experts at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.

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14-May-2018 10:05 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    7-May-2018 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 694020

Preclinical MD Anderson Study Suggests ARID1a May Be Useful Biomarker for Immunotherapy

University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

Functional loss of ARID1a, a frequently mutated tumor suppressor gene, causes deficiencies in normal DNA repair and may sensitize tumors to immune checkpoint blockade therapies, according to researchers from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. The preclinical study suggests that mutations in ARID1a could be beneficial in predicting immunotherapy success.

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3-May-2018 2:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 693985

MD Anderson, Spectrum Pharmaceuticals Complete Poziotinib Licensing Deal

University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center and Spectrum Pharmaceuticals have signed a licensing agreement that covers discoveries by MD Anderson researchers about the company’s drug poziotinib, a targeted therapy for lung cancer.

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3-May-2018 12:05 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    26-Apr-2018 12:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 693540

RNA Editing Study Shows Potential for More Effective Precision Cancer Treatment

University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

If there is one thing all cancers have in common, it is they have nothing in common. A multi-center study led by The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center has shed light on why proteins, the seedlings that serve as the incubator for many cancers, can vary from cancer to cancer and even patient to patient, a discovery that adds to a growing base of knowledge important for developing more effective precision therapies.

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26-Apr-2018 8:05 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    23-Apr-2018 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 693267

Size, Structure Help Poziotinib Pose Threat to Deadly Exon 20 Lung Cancer

University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

A drug that failed to effectively strike larger targets in lung cancer hits a bulls-eye on the smaller target presented by a previously untreatable form of the disease, researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center report in Nature Medicine.

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23-Apr-2018 10:00 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    19-Apr-2018 12:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 693128

Study May Explain Why Some Triple-Negative Breast Cancers Are Resistant to Chemotherapy

University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is an aggressive form of the disease accounting for 12 to 18 percent of breast cancers. It is a scary diagnosis, and even though chemotherapy can be effective as standard-of-care, many patients become resistant to treatment. A team at The University of Texas MD Anderson led a study which may explain how resistance evolves over time, and potentially which patients could benefit from chemotherapy.

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19-Apr-2018 9:05 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    17-Apr-2018 8:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 692864

Combination Therapy Strengthens T Cells in Melanoma Pre-Clinical Study

University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

A pre-clinical study of two drugs designed to boost T cell performance, has revealed the agents, when give in combination, may enhance the immune system’s ability to kill melanoma tumors deficient in the tumor suppressor gene PTEN. The study was led by investigators at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.

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16-Apr-2018 10:05 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    16-Apr-2018 9:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 692711

Precancerous Colon Polyps in Patients with Lynch Syndrome Exhibit Immune Activation

University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

Colon polyps from patients with Lynch syndrome, a hereditary condition that raises colorectal cancer risk, display immune system activation well before cancer development, according to research from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. The preclinical research challenges traditional models of cancer immune activation and suggests immunotherapy may be useful for colorectal cancer prevention in certain high-risk groups.

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13-Apr-2018 4:25 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    16-Apr-2018 8:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 692789

Boosting T Cell “Memory” May Result in Longer-Lasting and Effective Responses for Patients Treated with Checkpoint Blockade Immunotherapies

University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

Just like people, some T cells have excellent memories. These subtypes known as memory T cells may explain why some immunotherapies are more effective than others and potentially lead to researchers designing more effective studies using combination checkpoint blockade treatments, according to experts at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.

Released:
15-Apr-2018 8:00 AM EDT
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