Press "esc" to clear
Go to Advanced Search

Showing results

110 of 763

Article ID: 693149

Smartphone App Successfully Promotes Child Car Seat Safety

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

A smartphone app designed to promote proper child car seat use among parents proved effective in a study led by researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Released:
19-Apr-2018 11:05 AM EDT
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab
Comment

Article ID: 693037

Safety Measures Could Save 250,000 Lives a Year In Low- and Middle-Income Countries

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

Interventions such as speeding enforcement and formal swimming lessons for young children could potentially save more than 250,000 lives a year if they were implemented across populations living in extreme poverty in low- and middle-income countries, according to a new study from researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Released:
18-Apr-2018 9:05 AM EDT
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab
Comment
  • Embargo expired:
    16-Apr-2018 12:05 AM EDT

Article ID: 692587

A Foodborne Illness Outbreak Could Cost a Restaurant Millions, Study Suggests

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

A single foodborne outbreak could cost a restaurant millions of dollars in lost revenue, fines, lawsuits, legal fees, insurance premium increases, inspection costs and staff retraining, a new study from researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health suggests.

Released:
11-Apr-2018 9:05 AM EDT
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab
Comment

Article ID: 692464

Scientists Decry Lack of Science in `Forensic Science’

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

Many of the “forensic science” methods commonly used in criminal cases and portrayed in popular police TV dramas have never been scientifically validated and may lead to unjust verdicts, according to an editorial in this week’s Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Released:
9-Apr-2018 3:05 PM EDT
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab
Comment

Article ID: 692286

Increasing Public Support for Mental Health Services Without Stigmatizing Mental Illness

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

In public-health campaigns to boost support for improvements in the mental health system, messages that link mental illness to violence may be counterproductive, according to a study from researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Released:
5-Apr-2018 9:00 AM EDT
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab
Comment
  • Embargo expired:
    4-Apr-2018 6:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 692104

Poverty Increases Risk of Non-Communicable Diseases in Lower Income Countries

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

Poverty increases the risk of death and disability from non-communicable diseases, such as cancer, heart disease, stroke and diabetes in low- and middle-income countries, a new systematic review shows. Researchers also found evidence that developing an NCD increases the risk of falling into poverty in these countries.

Released:
3-Apr-2018 8:30 AM EDT
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab
Comment

Article ID: 692158

Peer Influence, Better HIV Counseling Could Encourage More Boys in Africa to Be Circumcised

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

With research showing that male circumcision reduces the odds of getting HIV through heterosexual sex by 60 percent, more boys and young men – primarily those between the ages of 10 and 19 – are having the procedure done, largely in eastern and southern African nations where circumcision is rarely performed at birth.

Released:
3-Apr-2018 3:05 PM EDT
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab
Comment

Article ID: 692088

Most Primary Care Offices Do Not Offer Reduced Price Care to the Uninsured, Study Funds

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

A new study from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health found that the uninsured face significant barriers to primary care, highlighting a group that remains vulnerable even after the Affordable Care Act insurance expansions. With trained auditors depicting low-income new uninsured patients, the study found that fewer than one in seven could confirm an office visit occurred if they were required to make payment arrangements to cover the cost of the visit.

Released:
2-Apr-2018 3:55 PM EDT
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab
Comment

Article ID: 691848

Better Communication Between Spouses May Equal Better Health Outcomes, New Research Suggests

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

Couples in Mali who spoke to one another about family planning were significantly more likely not only to use modern contraception, but to adopt a series of healthy behaviors ranging from being tested for HIV during pre-natal care visits to seeking treatment for a child’s cough, new research suggests.

Released:
28-Mar-2018 8:05 AM EDT
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab
Comment

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Article ID: 691712

Frequent, Public Drug Users May Be Good Candidates for Overdose-Treatment Training

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

The most frequent and public opioid users may be the best available candidates for naloxone training, according to a new study from scientists at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Released:
26-Mar-2018 12:05 PM EDT
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab
Comment

Showing results

110 of 763





Chat now!