Press "esc" to clear
Go to Advanced Search

Showing results

110 of 182
Norrisetal.jpg
  • Embargo expired:
    25-Jun-2018 9:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 696245

Researchers Identify Brain Cells Responsible for Removing Damaged Neurons After Injury

The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers at the University of Virginia School of Medicine have discovered that microglia, specialized immune cells in the brain, play a key role in clearing dead material after brain injury. The study, which will be published June 25 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, reveals that microglia gobble up the remnants of injured neurons, which could prevent the damage from spreading to neighboring neurons and causing more extensive neurodegeneration.

Released:
19-Jun-2018 9:00 AM EDT
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab
Comment
Messengeretal.jpg
  • Embargo expired:
    21-Jun-2018 9:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 696230

Researchers Uncover New Target to Stop Cancer Growth

The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have discovered that a protein called Munc13-4 helps cancer cells secrete large numbers of exosomes—tiny, membrane-bound packages containing proteins and RNAs that stimulate tumor progression. The study, which will be published June 21 in the Journal of Cell Biology, could lead to new therapies that stop tumor growth and metastasis by halting exosome production.

Released:
18-Jun-2018 12:00 PM EDT
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab
Comment
Caseyetal.jpg
  • Embargo expired:
    19-Jun-2018 9:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 695996

Breast Cancer Could Be Prevented by Targeting Epigenetic Proteins, Study Suggests

The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers at the Princess Margaret Cancer Centre in Toronto have discovered that epigenetic proteins promote the proliferation of mammary gland stem cells in response to the sex hormone progesterone. The study, which will be published June 19 in the Journal of Cell Biology, suggests that inhibiting these proteins with drugs could prevent the development of breast cancer in women at high risk of the disease.

Released:
12-Jun-2018 11:25 AM EDT
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab
Comment
  • Embargo expired:
    19-Jun-2018 9:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 696056

Cells can trap viruses in protein cage to stop their spread, study reveals

The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers at The Francis Crick Institute in London have discovered that cells can trap viruses in a protein cage to stop them from spreading to neighboring cells. The study, which will be published June 19 in the Journal of Cell Biology, reveals that the vaccinia virus can escape this trap by recruiting additional proteins to dismantle the cage and propel the virus out of the cell.

Released:
13-Jun-2018 9:40 AM EDT
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab
Comment
  • Embargo expired:
    18-May-2018 9:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 694530

Cardiomyopathy Mutation Reduces Heart’s Ability to Vary Pumping Force, Study Reveals

The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers from Washington State University have discovered how a genetic mutation linked to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy disrupts the heart’s normal function. The study, which will be published May 18 in the Journal of General Physiology, reveals that the mutation prevents the heart from increasing the amount of force it produces when it needs to pump additional blood around the body.

Released:
14-May-2018 1:05 PM EDT
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab
Comment
Mitchelletal_horizontal.jpg
  • Embargo expired:
    17-May-2018 9:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 694507

Single Surface Protein Boosts Multiple Oncogenic Pathways in Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Study Reveals

The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers from the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York have discovered that a signaling protein elevated in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) plays a much wider role in the disease than previously thought. The study, which will be published May 17 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, raises hopes that current efforts to target this signaling protein could be a successful strategy to treat AML and other blood cancers.

Released:
14-May-2018 10:05 AM EDT
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab
Comment
Schmidt1.jpg
  • Embargo expired:
    16-May-2018 9:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 694259

Cell Type Switch Helps Colon Cancer Evade Treatment, Study Suggests

The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers in Germany have discovered that colon cancers are often resistant to existing drug treatments because they are composed of two different cell types that can replace each other when one cell type is killed. The study, which will be published May 16 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, suggests that combination therapies targeting both cell types at once may be more effective at treating colorectal cancer, the third highest cause of cancer-related death in the United States.

Released:
9-May-2018 9:05 AM EDT
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab
Comment
Lopes.jpg
  • Embargo expired:
    8-May-2018 9:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 693863

Amplification of Key Cellular Organizer May Initiate Cancer, Study Suggests

The Rockefeller University Press

Cells begin to accumulate centrosomes—organelles that play a vital role during cell division—before they transform into cancer cells, according to a new study of patients with Barrett’s esophagus condition, which is associated with esophageal cancer. The research, which will be published May 8 in the Journal of Cell Biology, suggests that similar cases of centrosome amplification may contribute to the initiation and progression of a variety of human cancers.

Released:
2-May-2018 10:10 AM EDT
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab
Comment
Caoetal.jpg
  • Embargo expired:
    4-May-2018 9:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 693698

Osteoporosis Drug Could Be Used to Treat Aggressive Form of Breast Cancer, Researchers Say

The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers in China have discovered that an enzyme called UGT8 drives the progression of basal-like breast cancer, an aggressive form of the disease that is largely untreatable. But the study, which will be published May 4 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, reveals that the widely used osteoporosis drug zoledronic acid inhibits UGT8 and prevents the spread of basal-like breast cancer in mice, suggesting that this drug could also be used to treat the disease in humans.

Released:
30-Apr-2018 9:40 AM EDT
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab
Comment
Stockstilletal.jpg
  • Embargo expired:
    27-Apr-2018 9:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 693266

Multiple Sclerosis Drug Could Reduce Painful Side Effects of Common Cancer Treatment, Researchers Suggest

The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers from the Saint Louis University School of Medicine have discovered why many multiple myeloma patients experience severe pain when treated with the anticancer drug bortezomib. The study, which will be published April 27 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, suggests that a drug already approved to treat multiple sclerosis could mitigate this effect, allowing myeloma patients to successfully complete their treatment and relieving the pain of myeloma survivors.

Released:
23-Apr-2018 9:05 AM EDT
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab
Comment

Showing results

110 of 182





Chat now!