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Science

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SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Big Data, AI, Machine Learning, Astrophyics, Cosmology, Computer Science, datasets, Scientific Computing, X-ray science, X-ray Crystallogaphy, LSST, Large Synoptic Survey Telescope, lightsource, LCLS , Linac Coherent Light Source, LCLS-II, photon sciences

Q&A: Alan Heirich and Elliott Slaughter Take On SLAC’s Big Data Challenges

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As the Department of Energy’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory builds the next generation of powerful instruments for groundbreaking research in X-ray science, astronomy and other fields, its Computer Science Division is preparing for the onslaught of data these instruments will produce.

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Education

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SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, SSRL, Science, Biological Science, X-ray science, educational programs

Q&A: Sam Webb Teaches X-Ray Science from a Remote Classroom

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When Sam Webb teaches, he shows that science is a part of everyday life. For him, it’s important that students learn science does not need to be intimidating. Webb is a staff scientist at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL) at the Department of Energy’s SLAC National Acceleratory Laboratory. He started working at SSRL in the fall of 2001 as a postdoctoral researcher.

Science

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SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Artifical Intelligence, Machine Learning, accelerator science, advanced accelerators, Ultrafast, X-ray science, Accelerators, lightsource

Major Technology Developments Boost LCLS X-Ray Laser’s Discovery Power

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Accelerator experts at the Department of Energy’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory are developing ways to make the most powerful X-ray laser better than ever. They have created the world’s shortest X-ray pulses for capturing the motions of electrons, as well as ultra-high-speed trains of X-ray pulses for “filming” atomic motion, and have developed “smart” computer programs that maximize precious experimental time.

Science

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SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Science, Batteries, energy science, Materials Science, lightsource, Lithium, Lithium-ion batteries , SSRL, Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

Scientists Discover Path to Improving Game-Changing Battery Electrode

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Researchers from Stanford University, two Department of Energy national labs and the battery manufacturer Samsung created a comprehensive picture of how the same chemical processes that give cathodes their high capacity are also linked to changes in atomic structure that sap performance.

Science

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SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, LCLS , Linac Coherent Light Source, DNA, Uv Light, Biological Science, Chemistry, Catalysis, Ultrafast, X-ray science, lightsource, X-ray scattering & detection, x-ray diffraction

Research Zooms in on Enzyme That Repairs DNA Damage from UV Rays

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A research team at the Department of Energy’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory is using the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) to study an enzyme found in plants, bacteria and some animals that repairs DNA damage caused by the sun’s ultraviolet (UV) light rays.

Science

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SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, high-temperature superconductor, Science, condensed-matter physics, Materials Science, Scientific Computing

Study Confirms that Cuprate Materials Have Fluctuating Stripes that May Be Linked to High-temperature Superconductivity

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Scientists at the Department of Energy’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and Stanford University have shown that copper-based superconductors, or cuprates – the first class of materials found to carry electricity with no loss at relatively high temperatures – contain fluctuating stripes of electron charge and spin that meander like rivulets over rough ground.

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SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2D materials, accelerator science, Chemistry, Catalysis, electron diffraction, Electron Microscopy, Materials Science, Ultrafast, Accelerators, Engineering, lightsource, LCLS , Linac Coherent Light Source, photon science

SLAC-led Study Shows Potential for Efficiently Controlling 2-D Materials With Light

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In experiments with the lab’s ultrafast ‘electron camera,’ laser light hitting a material is almost completely converted into nuclear vibrations, which are key to switching a material’s properties on and off for future electronics and other applications.

Science

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SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Meteor, Silica, Science, Ultrafast, X-ray science, lightsource, LCLS , Linac Coherent Light Source

Scientists Make First Observations of How a Meteor-Like Shock Turns Silica Into Glass

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Studies at the Department of Energy’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory have made the first real-time observations of how silica – an abundant material in the Earth’s crust – easily transforms into a dense glass when hit with a massive shock wave like one generated from a meteor impact.

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SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Benjamin Franklin Medal in Physics, Franklin Institute, Particle Physics, Theoretical Physics, Award, Honor

SLAC’s Helen Quinn Honored with 2018 Benjamin Franklin Medal in Physics

Helen Quinn, a professor emerita at the Department of Energy’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and Stanford University, will receive the 2018 Benjamin Franklin Medal in Physics – one of eight prestigious Franklin Institute Awards that will be handed out in Philadelphia next April.

Science

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SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Metal, atomic structure, Science, Lasers, X-ray science, X-ray Scattering and Detection, x-ray diffraction, lightsource, LCLS , Linac Coherent Light Source

SLAC X-ray Laser Reveals How Extreme Shocks Deform a Metal’s Atomic Structure

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When hit by a powerful shock wave, materials can change their shape – a property known as plasticity – yet keep their lattice-like atomic structure. Now scientists have used the X-ray laser at the Department of Energy’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory to see, for the first time, how a material’s atomic structure deforms when shocked by pressures nearly as extreme as the ones at the center of the Earth.







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