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Article ID: 698591

Implicit Bias in Medicine - Expert Available to Discuss Issues and Approaches to Improve Communication and Patient Outcomes

Albert Einstein College of Medicine

Released:
7-Aug-2018 8:00 AM EDT
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    31-Jul-2018 10:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 697840

Soccer Heading Worse for Women’s Brains than for Men’s

Albert Einstein College of Medicine

Women’s brains are much more vulnerable than men’s to injury from repeated soccer heading, according to a new study by researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine, part of Montefiore. The study found that regions of damaged brain tissue were five times more extensive in female soccer players than in males, suggesting that sex-specific guidelines may be warranted for preventing soccer-related head injuries. The results were published online today in Radiology.

Released:
24-Jul-2018 1:00 PM EDT
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Article ID: 696216

Scientists Discover How Antiviral Gene Works

Albert Einstein College of Medicine

It’s been known for years that humans and other mammals possess an antiviral gene called RSAD2 that prevents a remarkable range of viruses from multiplying. Now, researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine, part of Montefiore, have discovered the secret to the gene’s success: The enzyme it codes for generates a compound that stops viruses from replicating. The newly discovered compound, described in today’s online edition of Nature, offers a novel approach for attacking many disease-causing viruses.

Released:
22-Jun-2018 11:30 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    26-Apr-2018 12:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 693361

Blood Cancer Precursor Found in 9/11 Firefighters

Albert Einstein College of Medicine

A study in today’s issue of JAMA Oncology reports that New York City firefighters exposed to the 9/11 World Trade Center disaster site face an increased risk for developing myeloma precursor disease (MGUS), which can lead to the blood cancer multiple myeloma. The study was conducted by researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Montefiore Health System, the Fire Department of the City of New York (FDNY) and Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center.

Released:
24-Apr-2018 12:05 PM EDT
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    24-Apr-2018 2:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 693296

Research Explains Link Between Exercise and Appetite Loss

Albert Einstein College of Medicine

Ever wonder why intense exercise temporarily curbs your appetite? In research described in today’s issue of PLOS Biology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine researchers reveal that the answer is all in your head—more specifically, your arcuate nucleus.

Released:
23-Apr-2018 1:05 PM EDT
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    24-Apr-2018 9:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 693129

Soccer Heading—Not Collisions—Cognitively Impairs Players

Albert Einstein College of Medicine

Worse cognitive function in soccer players stems mainly from frequent ball heading rather than unintentional head impacts due to collisions, researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine have found. The findings suggest that efforts to reduce long-term brain injuries may be focusing too narrowly on preventing accidental head collisions. The study published online today in the Frontiers in Neurology.

Released:
19-Apr-2018 9:05 AM EDT
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    11-Apr-2018 2:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 692506

Novel Drug Shows Promise Against Acute Myeloid Leukemia

Albert Einstein College of Medicine

In a study published online today in Science Translational Medicine, Albert Einstein College of Medicine researchers report that an experimental peptide (small protein) drug shows promise against the often-lethal cancer acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and describe how the drug works at the molecular level. The findings have led to a Phase I/II clinical trial for patients with advanced AML and advanced myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), now underway at Montefiore Health System.

Released:
10-Apr-2018 10:00 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    24-Jan-2018 1:00 PM EST

Article ID: 688242

Previously Unknown Ocean Virus Family May Also Populate the Human Gut

Albert Einstein College of Medicine

A newly discovered family of viruses appears to play a major role in killing marine bacteria and maintaining the ocean’s ecology. Preliminary evidence suggests that related bacterial viruses also occur in the human gut. The study, by researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine and Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), was published online today in the journal Nature.

Released:
22-Jan-2018 1:00 PM EST
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Article ID: 685797

Albert Einstein College of Medicine and John Theurer Cancer Center Receive $6.4 Million NIH Grant to Identify Breast Cancer Biomarkers

Albert Einstein College of Medicine

Researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine, part of Montefiore, and Hackensack Meridian Health John Theurer Cancer Center at Hackensack University Medical Center have secured a five-year, $6.4 million grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to identify biomarkers that can predict which women with pre-cancerous tissue in their breast will develop invasive breast cancer. This research could help personalize treatment and improve outcomes for tens of thousands of women each year.

Released:
28-Nov-2017 10:05 AM EST
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Article ID: 685142

Einstein Researchers Receive $6 Million Grant to Untangle the Genetic Protections Against Alzheimer’s Disease

Albert Einstein College of Medicine

The number of older adults with Alzheimer’s disease continues to rise, but the number of treatments for the condition has not kept pace. Now, researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine, part of Montefiore, have received a $6.3 million grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to identify networks of genes in healthy centenarians that protect them against dementia. The results could help identify new targets for drugs to treat Alzheimer’s.

Released:
14-Nov-2017 8:05 AM EST
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