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Science

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Bacteria, Enzymes, Biochemistry, Chemistry, Bioremediation

Enzyme Structures Illuminate Mechanism Behind Bacteria’s Bioremediation Prowess

In a publication in the journal Nature released today (March 27, 2017), scientists from the Department of Biochemistry and Department of Chemistry at the University of Wisconsin–Madison have solved the structure of an enzyme caught in the act of attacking toluene — a chemical derived from wood and oil.

Medicine

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Autism, Families, Neurology, Psychiatry

Researchers Gain Insight Into Day-to-Day Lives of Parents Raising Children with Autism

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A new study by Waisman Center researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison looks at the daily experiences of the parents of children with autism spectrum disorder to provide a more detailed picture of the strengths and vulnerabilities of couples raising a child with ASD.

Medicine

Science

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Stem Cells, Plants, Regenerative Medicine, Botany

Parsley and Other Plants Lend Form to Human Stem Cell Scaffolds

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Scientists at the University of Wisconsin-Madison are using the decellularized husks of plants such as parsley, vanilla and orchids to form three-dimensional scaffolds that can then be primed and seeded with human stem cells to optimize their growth in the lab dish and, ultimately, create novel biomedical implants.

Science

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Iceland, Insects, Midges, Entomology, Zoology, Ecology

Enormous Swarms of Midges Teach About Interconnected Landscapes

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Ecologists at the University of Wisconsin–Madison are trying to understand why the midge population at an Icelandic lake can fluctuate by 100,000-fold across a decade, and what impact these massive swarms have on the surrounding landscape.

Medicine

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Alexander disease, Diseases, Health, Neurology, Neurological Disorders

Researchers Make Headway Toward Understanding Alexander Disease

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Researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have made a surprising and potentially crucial discovery about Alexander disease, a rare and fatal neurological disorder with no known cure.

Science

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Water, Water Quality, Limnology, Lakes, Rivers, Pollution, Phosphorus, Agriculture, Farming, Manure

Study Quantifies Role of 'Legacy Phosphorus' in Reduced Water Quality

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For decades, phosphorous has accumulated in Wisconsin soils. Though farmers have taken steps to reduce the quantity of the agricultural nutrient applied to and running off their fields, a new study from the University of Wisconsin-Madison reveals that a "legacy" of abundant soil phosphorus in the Yahara watershed of Southern Wisconsin has a large, direct and long-lasting impact on water quality.

Life

Arts and Humanities, Education

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art, art and science, Artists, Tensegrity

Students Find Inspiration in Special Class Merging Science, Nature and Art

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Peter Krsko hauled 800 feet of hosing through the woods, drilled holes into the trees on his property in Wonewoc, Wisconsin, and for the first time, tapped his maples for the sap that will ultimately become maple syrup. While he was laboring, Krsko began to contemplate how trees fight gravity and move fluid from their roots deep in the ground to leaves and buds in the sky. That got him thinking about cells, the basic conduits of those fluids, and how they pack together to build the tissues and organs found in living things.

Science

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Dark Matter, Space, Astronomy, Physics, Astrophysics

Dark Matter Detection Receives 10-Ton Upgrade

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In an abandoned gold mine one mile beneath Lead, South Dakota, the cosmos quiets down enough to potentially hear the faint whispers of the universe’s most elusive material — dark matter. Shielded from the deluge of cosmic rays constantly showering the Earth’s surface, the mine, scientists think, will be the ideal setting for the most sensitive dark matter experiment to date.

Medicine

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Stem Cells, regenerative biology, development and reproductive biology, Developmental Biology

Study Shows Stem Cells Fiercely Abide by Innate Developmental Timing

The regenerative biology team at the Morgridge Institute for Research, led by stem cell pioneer and University of Wisconsin-Madison Professor James Thomson, is studying whether stem cell differentiation rates can be accelerated in the lab and made available to patients faster.

Science

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Solar System, Planets, Astronomy, Geoscience, Geology

From Rocks in Colorado, Evidence of a ‘Chaotic Solar System’

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Plumbing a 90 million-year-old layer cake of sedimentary rock in Colorado, a team of scientists from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and Northwestern University has found evidence confirming a critical theory of how the planets in our solar system behave in their orbits around the sun. The finding, published Feb. 23, 2017 in the journal Nature, is important because it provides the first hard proof for what scientists call the “chaotic solar system.”







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