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Science

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Biodiversity, energy & environmental research, life on Earth, Animal Science, Plant Science, Evolution, Survival

What Species Is Most Fit for Life? All Have an Equal Chance, Scientists Say

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There are more than 8 million species of living things on Earth, but none of them — from 100-foot blue whales to microscopic bacteria — has an advantage over the others in the universal struggle for existence. In a paper published Jan. 8 in the prestigious journal Nature Ecology & Evolution, scientists describe the dynamic that began with the origin of life on Earth 4 billion years ago.

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ESF Professor Receives National Forestry Award

Dr. Ralph D. Nyland was the recipient of the 2017 Barrington Moore Memorial Award from the Society of American Foresters (SAF).

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species restoration, Conservation Biology, Chittenango Falls State Park, Snail, Chittenango ovate amber snail

Snails Bred in Lab Help Species Crawl Back from Brink of Extinction

Work to restore the endangered Chittenango ovate amber snail, found only in one location inside a Central New York state park, continued this month with the release of tagged adult snails raised in a laboratory at the College of Environmental Science and Forestry.

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Trees, Urban Trees, Ecosystem Services, Megacities

What’s the Annual Value of Trees? $500 Million Per Megacity, Study Says

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In the megacities that are home to nearly 10 percent of the world’s 7.5 billion people, trees provide each city with more than $500 million each year in services that make urban environments cleaner, more affordable and more pleasant places to live.

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piping plovers, New Jersey, New Jersey shore, Lake Ontario, Wildlife Conservation, population restoration, Shorebirds, Endangered Species

Restoration Efforts Bolster Population of Endangered Piping Plovers

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High water on Lake Ontario, urbanization of the New Jersey shore and a growing predator population are among the challenges facing one of America’s iconic shorebirds and the conservationists determined to restore the bird’s population.

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species exploration, Biodiversity, new species, International Institute for Species Exploration

ESF Lists Top 10 New Species for 2017

A spider and an ant with names drawn from popular books, a pink katydid and an omnivorous rat made ESF's list of the Top 10 New Species for 2017. Also listed: a freshwater stingray, a bush tomato that appears to “bleed,” a devilish-looking orchid, a millipede with more than 400 legs, an amphibious centipede and a marine worm.

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top 10 new species, species exploration, Biodiversity, International Institute for Species Exploration

ESF to Announce Top 10 New Species This Month

The College of Environmental Science and Forestry (ESF) will announce the Top 10 New Species for 2017 this month. News about the Top 10 New Species will be distributed in an embargoed news release Thursday, May 18. The embargo will lift at 6 a.m. EDT Tuesday, May 23.

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Native American, Indigenous Science, Earth Day, march for science

Native American Scientists Endorse March for Science

More than 1,100 Native American and Indigenous scientists, scholars and allies worldwide have endorsed the March for Science that will be held in more than 500 locations around the world this Saturday.

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Pollinators, pesticide use, College of Environmental Science and Forestry, Food Safety

Pollinators Find a Safe Haven on ESF Campus

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The College of Environmental Science and Forestry in Syracuse, N.Y., has become a designated pollinator-friendly campus by agreeing to avoid the use of bee-toxic pesticides.

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American chestnut tree, transgenic trees, Biotechnology, tree restoration, Forestry

Mighty American Chestnut Poised for Return to America’s Forests

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Scores of American chestnut seedlings growing in upstate New York are the vanguard in the restoration of what was once the most dominant tree in the eastern forests. The trees carry one gene, added by scientists, that makes them capable of withstanding the invasive blight that wiped out billions of their ancestors a century ago.







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