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  • Embargo expired:
    21-Feb-2018 6:00 AM EST

Article ID: 689795

Similarities Found in Cancer Initiation in Kidney, Liver, Stomach, Pancreas

Washington University in St. Louis

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found that when mature cells transition to begin dividing again, they all seem to do it the same way, regardless of what organ those cells come from.

Released:
19-Feb-2018 3:55 PM EST
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Cancer, Cell Biology, Digestive Disorders, Kidney Disease, All Journal News

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Article ID: 689855

WashU Expert: Porn Star Payment Raises Ethics Concerns

Washington University in St. Louis

President Donald Trump’s private lawyer claims that he personally sent $130,000 to porn star Stephanie Clifford, who stated that she had an affair with Trump a decade ago, long prior to his election. The lawyer, Michael Cohen, claimed the payment was legal. But Peter Joy, a legal ethics expert at Washington University in St.

Released:
20-Feb-2018 3:05 PM EST
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Law and Public Policy

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Ethics and Research Methods, Government/Law, U.S. Politics

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Article ID: 689797

Incentive Reform Key to Racial Equity in America’s Cities

Washington University in St. Louis

Tax increment financing (TIF) and other development incentives have become American cities’ primary means of encouraging local economic development. A new study by the Brown School at Washington University in St. Louis finds that TIF incentives could promote racial equity by using greater transparency and more equitable targeting of the locations where tax incentives are used.

Released:
19-Feb-2018 4:05 PM EST
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Law and Public Policy

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Civil Liberties, Economics, Government/Law, Race, U.S. Politics, All Journal News

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Article ID: 689688

Higher Income Level Linked to Police Use of Force Against Black Women

Washington University in St. Louis

Black women with higher incomes are more likely to experience a forceful police interaction during a traffic stop, finds a new study from the Brown School at Washington University in St. Louis.“We found that the likelihood of exposure to each type of police use of force was significantly greater for black females with incomes over $50,000,” said Robert Motley Jr.

Released:
16-Feb-2018 11:05 AM EST
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

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All Journal News, Energy, Travel and Transportation, DOE Science News

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Article ID: 689656

U.S. Government Failure to Prevent Gun-Related Violence May Violate International Human Rights

Washington University in St. Louis

Washington University in St. Louis School of Law students will conduct in-depth research examining U.S. government responses to gun violence and whether they violate America’s obligations under international human rights law.The research project is part of a new initiative launched by Leila Sadat, director of the Whitney R.

Released:
15-Feb-2018 5:05 PM EST
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Law and Public Policy

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Crime and Forensic Science, Government/Law, Guns and Violence, U.S. Politics

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Article ID: 689633

Twin Peeks

Washington University in St. Louis

A new Olin Business School study suggests maybe there is no one best negotiator; maybe the person you should send into a negotiation depends on whom you’re up against.

Released:
15-Feb-2018 12:05 PM EST
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All Journal News, Entrepreneurship

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  • Embargo expired:
    15-Feb-2018 12:00 PM EST

Article ID: 689466

Study of Smoking and Genetics Illuminates Complexities of Blood Pressure

Washington University in St. Louis

Analyzing the genetics and smoking habits of more than half a million people has shed new light on the complexities of controlling blood pressure, according to a study led by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.

Released:
13-Feb-2018 12:05 PM EST
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Addiction, All Journal News, Blood Disorders, Genetics, Smoking

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Article ID: 689558

Cutting Off Cervical Cancer’s Fuel Supply Stymies Tumors

Washington University in St. Louis

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have shown that cervical tumors that don’t respond to radiation may be vulnerable to therapies that also attack the cancer’s fuel supply.

Released:
14-Feb-2018 2:05 PM EST
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All Journal News, Cancer, OBGYN, Women's Health

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Article ID: 689541

Washu Expert: Supreme Court to Decide if Lawyer Can Override Client’s Wishes

Washington University in St. Louis

The U.S. Supreme Court will decide this term whether a defense lawyer may admit a client’s guilt against the client’s wishes, and it is unlikely that the court will rule against the client, said a criminal law expert at Washington University in St. Louis.The court is hearing the case of McCoy v. Louisiana, in which Larry English, the trial lawyer of Louisiana death-row inmate Robert McCoy, said the evidence against McCoy was overwhelming and the only way to keep McCoy off death row was to admit his guilt and beg for leniency.

Released:
14-Feb-2018 11:05 AM EST
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Law and Public Policy

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Government/Law, U.S. Supreme Court

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Article ID: 689543

Race, Insurance Status Linked to Job Loss After Breast Cancer

Washington University in St. Louis

Job loss following early-stage breast cancer diagnosis is associated with race and insurance status, but not with any clinical or treatment-related factors, finds a new study from the Brown School at Washington University in St. Louis.Not only were an African-American patient or an uninsured patient four times more likely to leave the workforce despite fighting a cancer with high survival rates, but they also were more likely to return in a lesser job within the first two years cancer-free.

Released:
14-Feb-2018 11:05 AM EST
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All Journal News, Cancer, Cell Biology, Women's Health


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