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Article ID: 696415

Better Model of Water Under Extreme Conditions Could Aid Understanding of Earth's Mantle

University of Chicago

A team of University of Chicago scientists ran quantum simulations to develop a new model of the behavior of water at extremely high temperatures and pressures. The computational measurements, published June 18 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, should help scientists understand water’s role in the makeup of the mantle and potentially in other planets.

Released:
20-Jun-2018 3:30 PM EDT
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Article ID: 695570

Study Suggests Earth Could Have Supported Continental Crust, Life Earlier Than Thought

University of Chicago

The early Earth might have been habitable much earlier than thought, according to new research from a group led by University of Chicago scientists.

Released:
4-Jun-2018 3:20 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    31-May-2018 5:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 695293

Less Is More When It Comes to Predicting Molecules’ Conductivity

University of Chicago

Forward-thinking scientists in the 1970s suggested that circuits could be built using molecules instead of wires, and over the past decades that technology has become reality. The trouble is, some molecules have particularly complex interactions that make it hard to predict which of them might be good at serving as miniature circuits. But a new paper by two University of Chicago chemists presents an innovative method that cuts computational costs and improves accuracy by calculating interactions between pairs of electrons and extrapolating those to the rest of the molecule.

Released:
30-May-2018 12:30 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    24-May-2018 2:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 694955

New Theory Finds “Traffic Jams” in Jet Stream Cause Abnormal Weather Patterns

University of Chicago

A study in Science offers an explanation for a mysterious and sometimes deadly weather pattern in which the jet stream, the global air currents that circle the Earth, stalls out over a region. Much like highways, the jet stream has a capacity, researchers said, and when it’s exceeded, blockages form that are remarkably similar to traffic jams—and climate forecasters can use the same math to model them both.

Released:
22-May-2018 3:30 PM EDT
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Article ID: 694304

Nationwide Program Launches to Train New Generation of Quantum Engineers

University of Chicago

Funded by a $1.6 million award from the National Science Foundation, the Institute for Molecular Engineering at the University of Chicago and Harvard University will head a new nationwide graduate student training program for quantum science and engineering.

Released:
9-May-2018 4:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 693927

Most Americans Look to Research Universities for Innovation Leadership, Finds Polsky Center for Entrepreneurship and Innovation at UChicago

University of Chicago

An overwhelming majority of Americans are looking to research universities to be the foremost drivers of innovation at a time of anxiety over global competition, according to a new Innovation Indicator survey from the Polsky Center for Entrepreneurship and Innovation at the University of Chicago.

Released:
2-May-2018 4:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 693757

Researchers Lay Out How to Control Biology with Light—Without the Help of Genetics

University of Chicago

Over the past five years, University of Chicago chemist Bozhi Tian has been figuring out how to control biology with light. In a paper published April 30 in Nature Biomedical Engineering, Tian’s team laid out a system of design principles for working with silicon to control biology at three levels—from individual organelles inside cells to tissues to entire limbs. The group has demonstrated each in cells or mice models, including the first time anyone has used light to control behavior without genetic modification.

Released:
30-Apr-2018 6:05 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    26-Apr-2018 1:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 693250

Scientists Use Quantum “Spooky Action” to Entangle Objects You Can Actually See

University of Chicago

A group of researchers announced April 26 in Nature that they had managed to entangle perhaps the largest items yet, at a whopping 20 microns across—about the diameter of a single human hair.

Released:
20-Apr-2018 4:00 PM EDT
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Article ID: 692397

New Technique More Accurately Reflects Ponds on Arctic Sea Ice

University of Chicago

This one simple mathematical trick can accurately predict the shape and melting effects of ponds on Arctic sea ice, according to new research by UChicago scientists. The study, published April 4 in Physical Review Letters by researchers with UChicago and MIT, should help climate scientists improve models of climate change and perhaps plug a gap between scientific predictions and observations over the past decade, they said.

Released:
6-Apr-2018 6:05 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    8-Mar-2018 2:00 PM EST

Article ID: 690752

Researchers Sew Atomic Lattices Seamlessly Together

University of Chicago

Scientists with the University of Chicago and Cornell revealed a technique to "sew" two patches of crystals seamlessly together at the atomic level to create atomically-thin fabrics. This could lead to better solar cells and other electronics with new functions, like flexibility.

Released:
7-Mar-2018 5:00 PM EST
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