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Medicine

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Cochlear Implants, Deaf Children, Machine Learning, Language acquisition, MRI scan

Brain Imaging Predicts Language Learning in Deaf Children

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In a new international collaborative study between The Chinese University of Hong Kong and Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago, researchers created a machine learning algorithm that uses brain scans to predict language ability in deaf children after they receive a cochlear implant. This study’s novel use of artificial intelligence to understand brain structure underlying language development has broad reaching implications for children with developmental challenges. It was published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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kids and anxiety, Anxiety, anxiety disorder, Anxiety Disorders, Anxiety Reducing, Anxiety medications

How to Handle Anxious Kids. Is It Normal or Should You Be Concerned?

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Santa, Santa Claus, children crying, Children, anxious kids, Santa photo

How to Survive a Visit to Santa if Your Child Feels Anxious

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Feature article quoting child psychologist on ways to survive a Santa visit if your child feels overwhelmed or anxious.

Medicine

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medical marjiuana , Cancer, Children, Providers

Medical Marijuana for Children with Cancer? What Providers Think

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A study published in Pediatrics examined interdisciplinary provider perspectives on legal medical marijuana use in children with cancer. It found that 92 percent of providers were willing to help children with cancer access medical marijuana. However, providers who are legally eligible to certify for medical marijuana were less open to endorsing its use. While nearly a third of providers received one or more requests for medical marijuana, the lack of standards on formulations, dosing and potency was identified as the greatest barrier to recommending it. These findings reflect survey responses from 288 providers in Illinois, Massachusetts and Washington.

Medicine

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Cystic Fibrosis, Children, Kalydeco, ivacaftor, Phase 3 clinical trial

Cystic Fibrosis Drug Shows Promise in Children as Young as 1 Year of Age

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Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago is one of the study sites in the open label Phase 3 study that showed safety and effectiveness of the cystic fibrosis drug Kalydeco (ivacaftor) in children ages 1 to 2 years. Based on these results, Vertex Pharmaceuticals Inc., (Nasdaq: VRTX) plans to submit applications for the drug in this age group to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the European Medicines Agency (EMA). Kalydeco is currently approved by the FDA for the treatment of cystic fibrosis in patients aged 2 years and older.

Medicine

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Brain Tumor, Children, Pediatric, atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumor, Medulloblastoma

Promising Target for Treating Brain Tumors in Children

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Findings published in Oncotarget offer new hope for children with highly aggressive brain tumors like atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumor (AT/RT) and medulloblastoma. Previously, the authors of the study have shown that an experimental drug that inhibits polo-like kinase 4 (PLK4) stopped pediatric brain tumor growth in vitro. Now, they have demonstrated its success in an animal model – the drug shrank the tumor and increased survival. Importantly, the PLK4 inhibitor was able to cross the blood-brain barrier, which means that the drug can target cancer cells in the brain even when taken orally, avoiding the need for injection into the spinal fluid. In this new study, researchers also demonstrated that when they associate a PLK4 inhibitor with traditional chemotherapy drugs, they kill tumor cells with significantly lower drug doses.

Medicine

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Cystic Fibrosis, Microbiome, Bacteria

Study Describes the Good and Bad Lung Bacteria in Cystic Fibrosis Patients

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A large multicenter study found that patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) – who tend to develop chronic lung infections – had more good and bad bacteria in their lungs compared to controls. The study used bronchoalveolar lavage, in which a bronchoscope is directed into the lung to directly collect lung secretions, and also found less diversity of bacteria in the lungs of CF patients who were older and had more lung disease or inflammation. Results, published in the European Respiratory Journal, provide a basis for future treatment studies.

Medicine

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Gene Therapy, myotubular myopathy, Children, Pediatric, ASPIRO, Virus

New Gene Therapy Trial for Severe Neuromuscular Disorder in Children

Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago is one of the few centers participating in ASPIRO, an international Phase 1/2 clinical trial of a gene therapy product called AT132 for X-linked myotubular myopathy – a rare disease characterized by severe muscle weakness, breathing difficulty and early death.

Medicine

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Pediatrics, Pediatrician, Pediatric Surgery, pediatric neurological surgery, pediatric orthopedic surgery, pediatric orthopaedic surgery, post-operative fever

Early Postoperative Fever in Pediatric Patients Rarely Associated With an Infectious Source

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Post-operative fevers in children are rarely due to infection, yet they are often subjected to non-targeted testing. This conclusion has been widely recognized in adult patients undergoing surgery, but this is the first large-scale study to verify this finding in children.

Medicine

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Spinal Muscular Atrophy, SMA, Treatment, Phase 3 clinical trial, spinraza, Children, Pediatric, FDA approved

Drug Improves Muscle Function and Survival in Spinal Muscular Atrophy

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More than half of the babies with infantile-onset spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) who were treated with nusinersen (Spinraza) gained motor milestones, compared to none of the babies in the control group. Infants treated with the drug also had 63 percent lower risk of death. These final results from the 13-month, international, randomized, multicenter, sham procedure-controlled, phase 3 trial called ENDEAR were published in the New England Journal of Medicine.







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