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Article ID: 697257

Allergic Reactions to Foods are Milder in Infants, Study Finds

Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago

Symptoms of food-induced anaphylaxis in infants are much less severe than in toddlers and older children, according to a study from Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago published in the Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. Anaphylaxis is defined as a reaction that involves multiple systems in the body or a presentation with significant cardiac or respiratory symptoms. While in older children an allergic reaction to food can be life-threatening, anaphylaxis in infants mostly manifests as hives and vomiting, the study found. With over 350 cases analyzed, including 47 infants, this is the largest study to date to describe food-induced anaphylaxis in infants under 1 year of age compared to other age groups.

Released:
10-Jul-2018 3:55 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    9-Jul-2018 12:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 696996

A Lifetime Sentence: Incarceration of Parents Impacts Health of Their Children into Adulthood

Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago

Young adults who had parents incarcerated during childhood do not receive timely healthcare and have more unhealthy behaviors, Lurie Children’s researchers find

Released:
3-Jul-2018 2:50 PM EDT
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Article ID: 696835

Scientists Create Blood with Potential for Future Treatments

Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago

Researchers develop a simple and efficient method to induce human pluripotent stem cells to become blood, which could be key in future treatments for blood disorders, immune deficiencies and cancer

Released:
28-Jun-2018 4:25 PM EDT
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Article ID: 695776

Public Health Campaign Pays Off: Window Falls Drop by 50 Percent

Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago

In 2001, when 30 children under 5 fell out of a window, Chicago was facing a public health crisis that was preventable. By 2016, window falls were cut in half after the 2002 launch of an educational campaign called “Stop the Falls” that urges families of young children to never open windows more than four inches and to use child-safety window stoppers or window guards. This data comes from a study from Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago, which leads the campaign that was created by the Injury Free Coalition for Kids of Chicago.

Released:
7-Jun-2018 1:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 695373

Blood Test Shows Promise for Predicting Cerebral Palsy in Preemies

Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago

As the first step toward predicting cerebral palsy in premature infants, scientists have identified a panel of microRNAs that are changed in babies who later develop abnormal muscle tone. MicroRNAs are small, noncoding RNA molecules that are important regulators of gene expression affecting developmental processes. Searching for microRNAs that could serve as early biomarkers – biological signs of disease – scientists for the first time have demonstrated that it is feasible to evaluate over 750 microRNAs using only one-half milliliter of blood collected from babies weighing less than 1500 grams (or under three pounds). Results were published in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation – International.

Released:
31-May-2018 11:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 695003

Parents Want Better Food Labeling in Schools to Help Keep Their Kids with Food Allergy Safe

Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago

One in five parents did not feel that their child with food allergy was safe while at school, according to results of a national survey published in BMC Pediatrics. While most of the 289 parents surveyed reported that their child’s school had implemented at least one food allergy policy, they felt that more could be done.

Released:
23-May-2018 11:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 693751

Study Identifies New Target for Treatment of Pulmonary Hypertension

Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago

Scientists at Stanley Manne Children’s Research Institute at Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago have identified a gene called FoxM1 as a promising target for treatment of pulmonary hypertension, or high blood pressure in the lung arteries. Patients with this severe lung disease that damages the right side of the heart have a five-year survival rate of 50 percent. The study results, published in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, will drive development of new drugs to reverse a process called vascular remodeling, or thickening of lung artery walls – a key feature in pulmonary hypertension.

Released:
30-Apr-2018 4:30 PM EDT
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Article ID: 693410

Innovative Research Partnership Addresses Needs of College Bound Students with Food Allergy

Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago

Researchers identify needs and work alongside designers to develop a toolkit to support safe transition to college for students with food allergy

Released:
24-Apr-2018 4:50 PM EDT
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    4-Apr-2018 4:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 691914

Epilepsy in Young Children Should Be Treated as Urgently as Cancer

Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago

Survival of childhood cancers dramatically improved through national cooperative group research and care protocols; specialists call for the same model to improve outcomes of early life epilepsies.

Released:
28-Mar-2018 5:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 691521

Immunotherapy Trials for Food Allergy Hold Strong Appeal for Parents

Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago

Two-thirds of surveyed caregivers felt that their child’s food allergy affected their own daily lives very much or extremely, according to a report in the Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. Two-thirds of caregivers also expressed significant fear that their child would have an allergic reaction to food. Despite this fear, the majority of caregivers were eager to enroll their child in a clinical trial for immunotherapy, which involves giving the child a gradually increasing dose of the food allergen under close supervision in order to train the immune system to not react to that food. Only 8 percent of caregivers responded that they would not enroll their child in this type of clinical trial.

Released:
21-Mar-2018 11:05 AM EDT
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