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Article ID: 698877

Johns Hopkins Experts Create Opioid Prescribing Guidelines For 20 Common Surgical Procedures

Johns Hopkins Medicine

A Johns Hopkins expert panel of health care providers and patients have announced what is, to their knowledge, the nation’s first set of operation-specific opioid prescribing guidelines. The guidelines are based on the premise that opioid prescribing limits should be based on the operation performed rather than a blanket approach. The ranges offered for each of 20 common operations generally call for reductions from the current rates of opioid prescription, and the researchers say that patients themselves favor using less of the drugs than physicians often prescribe.

Released:
14-Aug-2018 9:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 698790

Surprise Finding: For Very Sick Elderly, Lighter Sedation Won’t Drop Risk of Postoperative Delirium, Study Suggests

Johns Hopkins Medicine

Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers say a study designed to see if reducing the amount of anesthesia reduces the risk of postoperative delirium in older patients surprisingly found that lighter sedation failed to do so in severely ill people undergoing hip fracture repair.

Released:
13-Aug-2018 8:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 698710

Research Tip: Caregivers Lack Medications, Knowledge to Manage Baltimore Children's Asthma

Johns Hopkins Medicine

In a new study, Johns Hopkins researchers found that fewer than half of interviewed caregivers for Baltimore preschool children with asthma were prepared to administer medication for routine management or emergency response to a child's chronic condition.

Released:
8-Aug-2018 12:00 PM EDT
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Article ID: 698674

Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center Researchers Using Big Data to Predict Immunotherapy Responses

Johns Hopkins Medicine

In the age of Big Data, cancer researchers are discovering new ways to monitor the effectiveness of immunotherapy treatments.

Released:
8-Aug-2018 9:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 698612

Researchers Uncover Potential New Drug Targets in the Fight Against HIV

Johns Hopkins Medicine

Johns Hopkins scientists report they have identified two potential new drug targets for the treatment of HIV. The finding is from results of a small, preliminary study of 19 people infected with both HIV—the virus that causes AIDS—and the hepatitis C virus. The study revealed that two genes—CMPK2 and BCLG, are selectively activated in the presence of type 1 interferon, a drug once used as the first line of treatment against hepatitis C.

Released:
7-Aug-2018 8:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 698555

Severe Preeclampsia Heart Imaging Study Reveals Roots of Cardiac Damage in Pregnant Women

Johns Hopkins Medicine

Johns Hopkins researchers say a heart imaging study of scores of pregnant women with the most severe and dangerous form of a blood pressure disorder has added to evidence that the condition — known as preeclampsia — mainly damages the heart’s ability to relax between contractions, making the organ overworked and poor at pumping blood.

Released:
6-Aug-2018 8:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 698454

pH Imbalance in Brain Cells May Contribute to Alzheimer’s Disease

Johns Hopkins Medicine

Johns Hopkins Medicine scientists say they have found new evidence in lab-grown mouse brain cells, called astrocytes, that one root of Alzheimer’s disease may be a simple imbalance in acid-alkaline—or pH—chemistry inside endosomes, the nutrient and chemical cargo shuttles in cells.

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2-Aug-2018 12:00 PM EDT
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Article ID: 698295

Turning Off Protein Could Boost Immunotherapy Effectiveness on Cancer Tumors

Johns Hopkins Medicine

Researchers at the Bloomberg~Kimmel Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy in the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center discovered inhibiting a previously known protein could reduce tumor burdens and enhance the effectiveness of immunotherapy treatments.

Released:
31-Jul-2018 10:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 698261

Survey of Sexual Medicine Society Members Reveals Only Half Ask For Patients’ Sexual Orientation

Johns Hopkins Medicine

Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers say their small survey of nearly 100 health care practitioners who are members of the Sexual Medicine Society of North America revealed that only half routinely ask their patients directly about their sexual orientation. In addition, the survey found, of those who do not ask, more than 40 percent say that sexual orientation is irrelevant to patients’ care, a position contrary to longstanding clinical evidence.

Released:
31-Jul-2018 9:00 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    30-Jul-2018 9:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 697920

Scientists Discover a Dynamic Cellular Defense Against Breast Cancer Invasion

Johns Hopkins Medicine

Johns Hopkins researchers report they have demonstrated in mouse tissue grown in the lab that the cell layer surrounding breast milk ducts reaches out to grab stray cancer cells to keep them from spreading through the body. The findings reveal that this cell layer, called the myoepithelium, is not a stationary barrier to cancer invasion, as scientists previously thought, but an active defense against breast cancer metastasis.

Released:
26-Jul-2018 9:00 AM EDT
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