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Medicine

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Blood Pressure, Low Sodium, Dash Diet, Stephen Juraschek, Lawrence Appel

Combination Low-Salt and Heart-Healthy “Dash” Diet as Effective as Drugs for Some Adults with High Blood Pressure

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A study of more than 400 adults with prehypertension, or stage 1 high blood pressure, found that combining a low-salt diet with the heart-healthy DASH diet substantially lowers systolic blood pressure — the top number in a blood pressure test — especially in people with higher baseline systolic readings.

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Seven Frank, Blood Transfusion, anestesiology, Critical Care, Patient Safety

Blueprint to Reduce Wasteful Blood Transfusions

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By analyzing data from randomized clinical trials comparing blood transfusion approaches, Johns Hopkins experts, along with colleagues at Cleveland Clinic and NYU Langone Medical Center, endorse recommendations for blood transfusions that reduce blood use to improve patient safety and outcomes. Publishing this week in JAMA Internal Medicine, the report also provides a how-to guide for launching a patient blood management program.

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bread wheat, Aegilops tauschii, Salzberg, Genome

What’s in Your Wheat? Johns Hopkins Scientists Piece Together Genome of Most Common Bread Wheat

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Johns Hopkins scientists report they have successfully used two separate gene technologies to assemble the most complete genome sequence to date of Triticum aestivum, the most common cultivated species of wheat used to make bread.

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AHA, American Heart Association, Meeting, Conference, Scientific Sessions, Michos, Chelko, Mesubi

News Tips from the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions

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Anaheim Convention Center Anaheim, California Nov. 11-15

Medicine

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Marfan Syndrome, mice, Heart Failure, Heart, Rosanne Rouf, Hal Dietz

Researchers Reverse Heart Failure in Marfan Mice

In experiments with mice that have a rodent form of Marfan syndrome, Johns Hopkins researchers report that even modestly increasing stress on the animals’ hearts — at levels well-tolerated in normal mice — can initiate heart failure. The findings, described August 4 in the Journal of Clinical Investigation Insight, revealed a novel cellular pathway in heart tissue that leads to heart failure and may serve as a model for a new standard of treatment for children with this aggressive form of Marfan syndrome.

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Richard Huganir, Neurosceince

News From and About Johns Hopkins Scientists at Society for Neuroscience Annual Meeting

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The following Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine faculty are scheduled to speak at the 2017 annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience in Washington, D.C., on Nov. 11-15. To arrange interviews, or for other information, call or email the media contacts listed above.

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Maya Venkataramani, Craig Pollack, Barry Solomon, Tina Cheng, Physician Attitudes, Parental Health

Survey Finds That Pediatric Care Doctors Attempt to Address Parental Health Issues That Affect Children, but are Limited by Practice-Related Barriers and Physician Attitudes

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A national survey of more than 200 pediatric primary care physicians found that while over three-quarters addressed at least one parental health issue, such as maternal depression or parental tobacco use, during child health visits and a majority recognized the impact of such issues on children’s health, fewer felt responsible for addressing them.

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Inflamation, Lloyd Miller, Dermatology

How the Skin Becomes Inflamed

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Publishing online this week in Cell Host & Microbe, researchers at Johns Hopkins report the discovery of a key underlying immune mechanism that explains why to how our skin becomes inflamed from conditions such as atopic dermatitis, more commonly known as eczema. Toxin-producing bacteria on the surface of our skin induces a protein that causes our own cells to react and cause inflammation.

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Hydrogel, ALS, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, Takanari Inoue

Researchers Report First-Ever Protein Hydrogels Made in Living Cells

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Johns Hopkins cell biologists report what they believe is the first-ever creation of tiny protein-based gelatin-like clumps called hydrogels inside living cells. The ability to create hydrogels on demand, they say, should advance the long scientific struggle to study the elusive structures—which form in nature when proteins or other molecules aggregate under certain conditions—and to uncover their suspected contributions to human diseases.

Medicine

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Robert Stevens, Cardiac Arrest, Brain, Brain Mapping

Mapping Brain Connectivity with MRI May Predict Outcomes for Cardiac Arrest Survivors, Study Finds

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A new study led by Johns Hopkins researchers found that measures of connectivity within specific cerebral networks were strongly linked to long-term functional outcomes in patients who had suffered severe brain injury following a cardiac arrest.







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