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Article ID: 687137

Harnessing Sperm to Treat Gynecological Diseases

American Chemical Society (ACS)

Delivering drugs specifically to cancer cells is one approach researchers are taking to minimize treatment side effects. Stem cells, bacteria and other carriers have been tested as tiny delivery vehicles. Now a new potential drug carrier to treat gynecological conditions has joined the fleet: sperm. Scientistsreport in the journal ACS Nano that they have exploited the swimming power of sperm to ferry a cancer drug directly to a cervical tumor in lab tests.

Released:
20-Dec-2017 9:30 AM EST
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All Journal News, Cancer, Cell Biology, Chemistry, OBGYN, Stem Cells, Pharmaceuticals, Women's Health, Local - DC, Local - DC Metro

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Article ID: 687136

Panning for Silver in Laundry Wastewater

American Chemical Society (ACS)

Silver nanoparticles are being used in clothing for their anti-odor abilities but some of this silver comes off when the clothes are laundered. The wastewater from this process could end up in the environment, possibly harming aquatic life, so researchers have attempted to recover the silver. Now, one group reports in ACS Sustainable Chemistry & Engineering that detergent chemistry plays a significant role in how much of this silver can be removed from laundry wastewater.

Released:
20-Dec-2017 9:30 AM EST
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Article ID: 687135

Blueberry Vinegar Improves Memory in Mice with Amnesia

American Chemical Society (ACS)

Dementia affects millions of people worldwide, robbing them of their ability to think, remember and live as they once did. In the search for new ways to fight cognitive decline, scientists report in ACS’ Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry that blueberry vinegar might offer some help. They found that the fermented product could restore cognitive function in mice.

Released:
20-Dec-2017 9:30 AM EST
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Aging, All Journal News, Alzheimer's and Dementia, Food Science, Mental Health, Neuro, Local - DC, Local - DC Metro

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Article ID: 686743

Improving Cyber Security in Harsh Environments

American Chemical Society (ACS)

Many people don’t worry about the security of their personal information until it’s too late. And protecting data is even more important for military personnel, whose lives could be in danger if some types of information were to get into the wrong hands. Now, one group reports in ACS Nano a new way to protect data, especially when it is subjected to extreme environmental conditions.

Released:
13-Dec-2017 9:05 AM EST
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All Journal News, Technology, Cybersecurity, Local - DC, Local - DC Metro

Article ID: 686745

Creating Surfaces That Repel Water and Control Its Flow (Video)

American Chemical Society (ACS)

To prevent water and ice from making our shoes soggy, frosting our car windows and weighing down power lines with icicles, scientists have been exploring new coatings that can repel water. Now one team has developed a way to direct where the water goes when it’s pushed away. Their report appears in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces.

Released:
13-Dec-2017 9:05 AM EST
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Article ID: 686740

Bringing ‘Avatar’-Like Glowing Plants to the Real World

American Chemical Society (ACS)

The 2009 film “Avatar” created a lush imaginary world, illuminated by magical, glowing plants. Now researchers are starting to bring this spellbinding vision to life to help reduce our dependence on artificial lighting. They report in ACS’ journal Nano Letters a way to infuse plants with the luminescence of fireflies.

Released:
13-Dec-2017 9:05 AM EST
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Chemistry, Plants, Local - DC, Local - DC Metro, All Journal News

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Article ID: 686282

Bioelectronic ‘Nose’ Can Detect Food Spoilage by Sensing the Smell of Death

American Chemical Society (ACS)

Strong odors are an indicator that food has gone bad, but there could soon be a new way to sniff foul smells earlier on. As reported in ACS Nano, researchers have developed a bioelectronic “nose” that can specifically detect a key decay compound at low levels, enabling people to potentially take action before the stink spreads. It can detect rotting food, as well as be used to help find victims of natural disasters or crimes.

Released:
6-Dec-2017 9:45 AM EST
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Chemistry, Food and Water Safety, Food Science, Nanotechnology, Local - DC, Local - DC Metro, All Journal News

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Article ID: 686283

Diesel Vehicles in Oil Sands Operations Contribute to Regional Pollution

American Chemical Society (ACS)

Wildfires, cigarette smoking and vehicles all emit a potentially harmful compound called isocyanic acid. The substance has been linked to several health conditions, including heart disease and cataracts. Scientists investigating sources of the compound have now identified off-road diesel vehicles in oil sands production in Alberta, Canada, as a major contributor to regional levels of the pollutant. Their report appears in ACS’ journal Environmental Science & Technology.

Released:
6-Dec-2017 9:45 AM EST
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Automotive, Chemistry, Environmental Science, Pollution, Local - DC, Local - DC Metro, Scientific Meetings

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Article ID: 686281

‘Stressed Out’ Cocoa Trees Could Produce More Flavorful Chocolate

American Chemical Society (ACS)

Most people agree that chocolate tastes great, but is there a way to make it taste even better? Perhaps, according to scientists who looked at different conditions that can put a strain on cocoa trees. Reporting in ACS’ Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, they say that although the agricultural method used to grow cocoa trees doesn’t matter that much, the specific weather conditions do.

Released:
6-Dec-2017 9:40 AM EST
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Agriculture, Chemistry, Food Science, Local - DC, Local - DC Metro, All Journal News

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Article ID: 685875

Getting a Better Handle on Methane Emissions From Livestock

American Chemical Society (ACS)

Cattle, swine and poultry contribute a hefty portion to the average American’s diet, but raising all this livestock comes at a cost to the environment: The industry produces a lot of methane, a potent greenhouse gas. Just how much gas the animals release, however, is the subject of debate. Now, one group reports in ACS’ journal Environmental Science & Technology that a new approach could shed light on how accurate current data are.

Released:
29-Nov-2017 9:30 AM EST
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All Journal News, Environmental Science, Technology, Local - DC, Local - DC Metro


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