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Article ID: 693193

This Remote-Control Shoots Laser at Gold to Switch on Cancer-Killing Immune Cells

Georgia Institute of Technology

Cancer immune cell therapy has made headlines with astounding successes like saving former U.S. President Jimmy Carter from brain cancer. But immunotherapy has also had many tragic flops. Georgia Tech researchers working to optimize the innovative treatment have implanted a genetic switch that activates T-cells when they are inside of tumors. Remote-control light waves resembling those used in a TV remote combine with gold nanorods to flip the switch.

Released:
19-Apr-2018 4:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 692062

Robot Designed to Defend Factories Against Cyberthreats

Georgia Institute of Technology

Developed by a team of researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology, the HoneyBot is designed to lure in digital troublemakers who have set their sights on industrial facilities. HoneyBot will then trick the bad actors into giving up valuable information to cybersecurity professionals.

Released:
2-Apr-2018 12:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 691336

A Future Colorfully Lit by Mystifying Physics of Paint-On Semiconductors

Georgia Institute of Technology

It defies conventional wisdom about semiconductors. It's baffling that it even works. It eludes physics models that try to explain it. This newly tested class of light-emitting semiconductors is so easy to produce from solution that it could be painted onto surfaces to light up our future in myriad colors shining from affordable lasers, LEDs, and even window glass.

Released:
19-Mar-2018 9:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 691089

Turbocharging Fuel Cells with a Multifunctional Catalyst

Georgia Institute of Technology

Zero-emissions cars zipping into a sustainable energy future are just one dream powered by fuel cells. But cell technology has been a little sluggish and fuel prohibitively pricey. This new catalyst could offer a game changer. And there are more developments to come.

Released:
14-Mar-2018 11:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 690690

New Insights Could Pave The Way For Self-Powered Low Energy Devices

Georgia Institute of Technology

Researchers have discovered more details about the way certain materials hold a static charge even after two surfaces separate, information that could help improve devices that leverage such energy as a power source.

Released:
7-Mar-2018 9:05 AM EST
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Article ID: 690505

Comparison Shows Value of DNA Barcoding in Selecting Nanoparticles

Georgia Institute of Technology

The first direct comparison of in vitro and in vivo screening techniques for identifying nanoparticles that may be used to transport therapeutic molecules into cells shows that testing in lab dishes isn’t much help in predicting which nanoparticles will successfully enter the cells of living animals.

Released:
4-Mar-2018 9:05 PM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    19-Feb-2018 2:00 PM EST

Article ID: 689662

Real-Time Captcha Technique Improves Biometric Authentication

Georgia Institute of Technology

A new login authentication approach could improve the security of current biometric techniques that rely on video or images of users’ faces. Known as Real-Time Captcha, the technique uses a unique “challenge” that’s easy for humans — but difficult for attackers who may be using machine learning and image generation software to spoof legitimate users.

Released:
15-Feb-2018 9:05 PM EST
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Article ID: 689772

Data Detectives Shift Suspicions in Alzheimer's from Usual Suspect to Inside Villain

Georgia Institute of Technology

The pursuit of the usual suspect in Alzheimer's research may be distracting from a more direct culprit in the disease, according to a study that analyzed data from 51 published experiments. P-tau looked a good bit more culpable than amyloid-beta plaque.

Released:
19-Feb-2018 12:05 PM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    18-Feb-2018 5:30 PM EST

Article ID: 689672

Why Bees Soared and Slime Flopped as Inspirations for Systems Engineering

Georgia Institute of Technology

Honeybee behavior inspired a web hosting algorithm that saved significant costs. Nature can serve as a wonderful model for engineering, but it can also flop. Take slime mold: As a model for connectivity, it falls flat in comparison with classical algorithms.

Released:
16-Feb-2018 9:05 AM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    2-Feb-2018 12:00 PM EST

Article ID: 688831

Hatchet Enzyme, Enabler of Sickness and of Health, Exposed by Neutron Beams

Georgia Institute of Technology

A pioneering glimpse at an enzyme inside elusive cell membranes elucidates a player in cell health but also in hepatitis C and in Alzheimer's. With neutron beams, researchers open a portal into the hidden world of intramembrane proteins, which a third of the human genome is required to create.

Released:
1-Feb-2018 3:35 PM EST
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