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Embargo will expire:
22-Feb-2018 12:00 PM EST
Released to reporters:
15-Feb-2018 3:00 PM EST

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 22-Feb-2018 12:00 PM EST

Channels:

Cell Biology, Infectious Diseases, Technology, Vision, All Journal News, Artificial Intelligence, Cell (journal), Local - California

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  • Embargo expired:
    13-Feb-2018 2:00 PM EST

Article ID: 689367

In Effort to Treat Rare Blinding Disease, Researchers Turn Stem Cells into Blood Vessels

University of California San Diego Health

People with a mutated ATF6 gene have a malformed or missing fovea, severely limiting vision. UC San Diego School of Medicine researchers first linked ATF6 to this type of vision impairment. Now the team discovered that a chemical that activates ATF6 converts patient stem cells into blood vessels.

Released:
12-Feb-2018 12:15 PM EST
EXPERT AVAILABLE
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Channels:

All Journal News, Cell Biology, Genetics, Pharmaceuticals, Stem Cells, Vision, Local - California, Grant Funded News

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  • Embargo expired:
    8-Feb-2018 12:00 PM EST

Article ID: 688987

Enzyme Plays a Key Role in Calories Burned Both During Obesity and Dieting

University of California San Diego Health

Ever wonder why obese bodies burn less calories or why dieting often leads to a plateau in weight loss? In both cases the body is trying to defend its weight by regulating energy expenditure. In a paper publishing in Cell on February 8, University of California San Diego School of Medicine researchers identify the enzyme TANK-binding kinase 1 (TBK1) as a key player in the control of energy expenditure during both obesity and fasting.

Released:
5-Feb-2018 2:05 PM EST
EXPERT AVAILABLE
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Channels:

All Journal News, Cell Biology, Nutrition, Obesity, Cell (journal), Local - California

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Article ID: 689154

Peptide Improves Glucose and Insulin Sensitivity, Lowers Weight in Mice

University of California San Diego Health

Treating obese mice with catestatin (CST), a peptide naturally occurring in the body, showed significant improvement in glucose and insulin tolerance and reduced body weight, report University of California San Diego School of Medicine researchers.

Released:
7-Feb-2018 12:05 PM EST
EXPERT AVAILABLE
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Channels:

All Journal News, Diabetes, Drug Resistance, Local - California

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Article ID: 689062

Children Affected by Prenatal Drinking More Numerous than Previously Estimated

University of California San Diego Health

Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine found a significant number of children across four regions in the United States were determined to have fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD). The new findings may represent more accurate prevalence estimates of FASD among the general population than prior research.

Released:
6-Feb-2018 12:05 PM EST
EXPERT AVAILABLE
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Channels:

Addiction, Alcohol and Alcoholism, All Journal News, OBGYN, JAMA, Local - California

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Article ID: 689048

UC San Diego Health Selected as Accountable Care Organization

University of California San Diego Health

UC San Diego Health has been selected by Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) as one of 561 Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs), ensuring as many as 10.5 million Medicare beneficiaries across the United States have access to high-quality, coordinated care.

Released:
6-Feb-2018 11:05 AM EST
EXPERT AVAILABLE
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Channels:

Healthcare, Public Health, Local - California

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  • Embargo expired:
    5-Feb-2018 12:00 PM EST

Article ID: 688832

What Makes a Good Egg?

University of California San Diego Health

In approximately 15 percent of cases where couples are unable to conceive, the underlying cause of infertility is not known. Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine and in the Division of Biological Sciences at UC San Diego have identified a protein in mice that must be present in eggs for them to complete normal development. Without the protein, called ZFP36L2, the eggs appear ordinary, but they cannot be fertilized by sperm.

Released:
1-Feb-2018 2:50 PM EST
EXPERT AVAILABLE
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Channels:

Cell Biology, Genetics, OBGYN, Women's Health, Local - California, All Journal News

zika_niaid.jpg

Article ID: 688490

Repurposed Drug Found to Be Effective Against Zika Virus

University of California San Diego Health

In both cell cultures and mouse models, a drug used to treat Hepatitis C effectively protected and rescued neural cells infected by the Zika virus — and blocked transmission of the virus to mouse fetuses. Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine, with colleagues in Brazil and elsewhere, say their findings support further investigation of using the repurposed drug as a potential treatment for Zika-infected adults, including pregnant women.

Released:
25-Jan-2018 11:05 AM EST
EXPERT AVAILABLE
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Channels:

All Journal News, Infectious Diseases, Public Health, Women's Health, Zika Virus, Pharmaceuticals, Scientific Reports, Local - California

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Article ID: 688445

Alexander Khalessi, MD, Named Chair of Neurosurgery Department at UC San Diego Health

University of California San Diego Health

After a national search, Alexander Khalessi, MD, has been named chair of the Department of Neurosurgery at UC San Diego Health and chief of the Division of Neurosurgery in the Department of Surgery at University of California San Diego School of Medicine.

Released:
24-Jan-2018 3:05 PM EST
EXPERT AVAILABLE
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Channels:

Cancer, Neuro, Local - California

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  • Embargo expired:
    24-Jan-2018 12:05 AM EST

Article ID: 688145

Wisdom at the End of Life

University of California San Diego Health

In a paper publishing January 24 in the journal International Psychogeriatrics, researchers at the University of California San Diego School of Medicine asked 21 hospice patients, ages 58 to 97 and in the last six months of their lives, to describe the core characteristics of wisdom and whether their terminal illnesses had changed or impacted their understanding of wisdom.

Released:
18-Jan-2018 2:05 PM EST
EXPERT AVAILABLE
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Channels:

Aging, All Journal News, Behavioral Science, Neuro, Psychology and Psychiatry, Local - California


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