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Article ID: 694368

Research Finds 'Achilles Heel' for Aggressive Prostate Cancer

UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center

UC San Francisco researchers have discovered a promising new line of attack against lethal, treatment-resistant prostate cancer. Analysis of hundreds of human prostate tumors revealed that the most aggressive cancers depend on a built-in cellular stress response to put a brake on their own hot-wired physiology.

Released:
14-May-2018 12:45 PM EDT
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Article ID: 691067

E-Cigarette Use Exposes Teens to Toxic Chemicals

UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center

Adolescents who smoke e-cigarettes are exposed to significant levels of potentially cancer-causing chemicals also found in tobacco cigarettes, even when the e-cigarettes do not contain nicotine, according to a study by UC San Francisco researchers.

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14-Mar-2018 3:50 PM EDT
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Article ID: 687935

Youth Using Alternative Tobacco Products Are More Likely to Smoke 1 Year Later

UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center

Nonsmoking adolescents who use e-cigarettes, smokeless tobacco or tobacco water pipes are more likely to start smoking conventional cigarettes within a year, according to new research by UC San Francisco.

Released:
15-Jan-2018 12:30 PM EST
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Article ID: 685102

Deadly Lung Cancers Are Driven by Multiple Genetic Changes

UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center

A new UC San Francisco–led study challenges the dogma in oncology that most cancers are caused by one dominant “driver” mutation that can be treated in isolation with a single targeted drug.

Released:
14-Nov-2017 1:05 PM EST
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Article ID: 680899

Breast Cancer Patients Who Freeze Their Eggs See No Delay for Chemotherapy

UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center

Women who receive a breast cancer diagnosis while they are still young enough to bear children can take time to freeze their eggs and embryos without fear of delaying their cancer treatment, according to research by UC San Francisco scientists who have helped develop a faster fertility preservation technique that can achieve in two weeks what used to take a month or longer.

Released:
14-Sep-2017 9:45 AM EDT
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Article ID: 681107

University of California Cancer Consortium Takes on California’s $14 Billion Killer

UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center

The University of California’s five academic cancer centers, home to some of the world’s leading scientists and physicians, have formed a consortium to better address California’s most pressing cancer-related problems and opportunities, UC President Janet Napolitano and Dr. John Stobo, executive vice president of UC Health, announced today.

Released:
14-Sep-2017 9:45 AM EDT
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Article ID: 677855

Big-Data Analysis Points Toward New Drug Discovery Method

UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center

A research team led by scientists at UC San Francisco has developed a computational method to systematically probe massive amounts of open-access data to discover new ways to use drugs, including some that have already been approved for other uses.

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13-Jul-2017 4:05 PM EDT
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    17-May-2017 5:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 674924

Eating Right and Exercising Could Reduce the Risk of Colon Cancer Recurrence

UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center

Colon cancer patients who have a healthy body weight, exercise regularly and eat a diet high in whole grains, fruits and vegetables have a significantly lower risk of cancer recurrence or death, according to a research team led by UC San Francisco investigators. This finding represents an analysis of data collected on patients participating in a national study for people with stage III colon cancer.

Released:
17-May-2017 5:00 PM EDT
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Article ID: 672951

Quest for Balance in Radiation Leads to Lower Doses

UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center

New UC Project Finds Roadmap to Improve Patient Safety in Radiation Exposure

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13-Apr-2017 2:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 670235

Genetic ‘Balance’ May Influence Response to Cancer Treatment

UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center

Choosing among cancer treatments increasingly involves determining whether tumor cells harbor specific, mutated “oncogenes” that drive abnormal growth and that may also be especially vulnerable or resistant to particular drugs. But according to a new study led by UCSF researchers, in the case of the most commonly mutated cancer-driving oncogene, called KRAS (pronounced “kay-rass”), response to treatment can change as tumors evolve, either when a normal copy of the gene from the other member of the matched chromosome pair is lost, or when the cancers cells evolve to produce additional copies of the mutated form of the gene.

Released:
27-Feb-2017 5:05 PM EST
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