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Aging and Genes: Meet and Question Researchers Live on Newswise

Newswise is offering reporters a behind-the-scenes look at the state of the research and the impact it might have on global public health by interacting with two leading scientists in the field and an author who has investigated the research for over a decade. With all the elements of a great story, the search for healthful human longevity sheds light on discoveries that could fundamentally reshape human life.

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Texas Tech Climate Scientist Named to 2014 TIME 100

Katharine Hayhoe, an associate professor and director of the Climate Science Center at Texas Tech University, listed under the "Pioneers" category.

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Late Freeze Kills Fruit Buds

Horticulturist explains how to check if your fruit buds survived the late burst of cold weather.

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More Questions Than Answers as Mystery of Domestication Deepens

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A recent interdisciplinary conference that led to the publication of a special issue of PNAS on domestication raised more questions than it answered. Washington University in St. Louis scientists Fiona Marshall and Ken Olsen, who participated in the conference and contributed to the special issue, discuss some of the key questions that have been raised about this pivotal event in human history.

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The Upshot of 'Heartbleed'? Jobs

The Internet bug "Heartbleed" was a stark reminder of how vulnerable our information is on the web, but also a sign that future job growth is rooted in securing that information. Higher education plays a significant role in helping fill these jobs.

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National DNA Day is April 25; Experts Available for Comment

Friday, April 25, is National DNA Day, the date which commemorates completion of the Human Genome Project, the national effort to identify and decode all 6 billion letters in human DNA. Since that time, medical researchers and practitioners have found new ways to apply genomics for everyone who needs healing, and thanks to staggering technological advancements and next-generation sequencing, the cost to sequence a patient’s genome has decreased from $3 billion for the first human genome in 2003 to approximately $1,500.

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Made-in-Wisconsin Atom Probe Assisted Dating of Oldest Piece of Earth

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It's a scientific axiom: big claims require extra-solid evidence. So when University of Wisconsin-Madison geoscience professor John Valley dated an ancient crystal to 4.4 billion years ago, skeptics questioned the dating. Then, in 2013, Valley's colleagues at CAMECA put the zircon inside an ultra-precise atom probe and, Valley says, got "data that answered the most serious of the challenges going back to 2001."

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Everyone on Earth Is Invited to Earth Day Tweet-Up and Can Now Watch What Happens Live During Meet and Tweet with Stony Brook University’s Three Indianapolis Prize Finalists

On Earth Day, April 22, not only will everyone on the planet be able to bond on Twitter with Stony Brook University’s three Indianapolis Prize finalists – Russ Mittermeier, Carl Safina and Pat Wright – they will also be able to watch a live webcast of the University’s first ever “Tweet-Up” featuring these three remarkable conservationists.

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Safely Dispose Unused Medications

The next nationwide medication disposal day is Saturday, April 26, from 10 a.m. until 2 p.m.

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Combating Malaria Using Environmental, Disease Data

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Dealing with malaria is a fact of life for more than 91 million Ethiopians. Each year four to five million contract malaria, one of the biggest health problems in this poor country. Through a five-year, $1.7 million grant from the National Institutes of Health, and Michael Wimberly of the Geographic Information Science Center of Excellence and an international team of scientists will combine environmental data gathered through earth-imaging satellites and surveillance data from public health professionals in the Amhara region of Ethiopia to anticipate malaria outbreaks.

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