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Article ID: 666505

Holiday Safety Tips from Stony Brook Experts to Ensure the Season Stays Merry and Bright

Stony Brook University

The hustle and bustle that comes with the ‘most wonderful time of the year’ can unfortunately lead many to disregard of important safety precautions.

Released:
14-Dec-2016 1:05 PM EST
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Article ID: 663005

Gearing Up for Flu Season: Prevention Is Key

Stony Brook University

Colder temps during the first months of fall are a stark reminder that people should start thinking about how to prevent the influenza virus, or the flu.

Released:
17-Oct-2016 5:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 662865

Stony Brook Children’s Shares Safety Tricks to Keep Halloween a Treat

Stony Brook University

Halloween is meant to be the spookiest time of year, but no parent wants to experience a real scare on the special night. Stony Brook Children’s experts share tips and tricks on how to steer clear from hidden health and safety dangers.

Released:
14-Oct-2016 2:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 628051

Bracing for a Tough Flu Season

Stony Brook University

In early December, the Center of Disease Control officials warned that the year's flu season could result in more fatalities than in other years. CDC Director Tom Frieden noted that the dominant flu strain circulating this season, H3N2, tends to lead to a greater number of hospitalizations and fatalities than other strains. About half of the flu samples tested in the early stages of this year's flu season were a new H3 subtype of the virus that this year's vaccine is not well prepared to fight.

Released:
7-Jan-2015 10:00 AM EST
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Article ID: 627401

Decking the Halls Safely During the Holidays

Stony Brook University

It’s the ‘most wonderful time of the year’ – but it is also one of the busiest times of year for the Suffolk County Volunteer Firefighters Burn Center at Stony Brook University Hospital. As the holidays approach, doctors at the Burn Center are urging people to take extra precautions and to eliminate potential dangers that could lead to serious burn injuries. “Between Thanksgiving and New Year’s Day, we see a significant increase in patients coming in with burns,” said Steven Sandoval, MD, Medical Director, Suffolk County Volunteer Firefighters Burn Center, Stony Brook University Hospital. “Holiday celebrations should be full of joy, but if not careful, could quickly turn tragic.” Dr. Sandoval says many of these burns and injuries can be preventable and shares some tips for a safe holiday season.

Released:
12-Dec-2014 11:00 AM EST
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Article ID: 624058

First Diagnosed Case of Ebola in the U.S., What Now?

Stony Brook University

A patient being treated at a Dallas hospital is the first person to be diagnosed with Ebola in the United States, health officials announced yesterday. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the unidentified man left Liberia on September 19 and arrived in the United States on September 20. At that time, the individual did not have symptoms, but several days later, he began to feel ill. He went to a local emergency department, but was discharged and went home. As he continued to be symptomatic, he went to the emergency department of Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital where is was admitted and isolated on Sunday.

Released:
1-Oct-2014 2:00 PM EDT
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Article ID: 623036

What Is Enterovirus D68?

Stony Brook University

A respiratory virus that has sent hundreds of children to hospitals in Missouri is causing alarm across the Midwest and beyond. So far, ten states have contacted the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for help investigating clusters of the virus that's being blamed for the illness. Although health officials say they're still figuring out what's going on, the bug that appears to be causing most of the concern is Enterovirus D68 (EV-D68). Many of its symptoms are very common and could be confusing parents with sick children.

Released:
9-Sep-2014 2:10 PM EDT
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Article ID: 622849

What is Keeping Your Kids Up at Night?

Stony Brook University

Sleep, or lack thereof, and technology often go hand in hand when it comes to school-aged kids. Nearly three out of four children (72%) between the ages of 6 and 17 have at least one electronic device in their bedrooms while sleeping, according to a National Sleep Foundation survey. Children who leave those electronic devices on at night sleep less—up to one hour less on average per night, according to a poll released by the foundation earlier this year.

Released:
4-Sep-2014 4:00 PM EDT
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Article ID: 622512

Teens: Want to Sleep in on School Days?

Stony Brook University

Pediatricians have a new prescription for schools: later start times for teens. Delaying the start of the school day until at least 8:30 a.m. would help curb their lack of sleep, which has been linked with poor health, bad grades, car crashes and other problems, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) said in a new policy, which outlined chronic sleep deficits in our nation’s adolescents.

Released:
26-Aug-2014 3:00 PM EDT
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Article ID: 621210

Stony Brook Children’s Expert Says ACT Now, Reduce Deaths in Hot Cars

Stony Brook University

Babies and young children can sleep so peacefully that it may be tempting to leave them alone in a car while you run a quick errand. This, however, must never be done. It can lead to heatstroke, serious injury, and death. Heatstroke is the leading cause of non-crash, vehicle-related deaths for children. It has claimed the lives of more than 600 children since 1998, and that number grows close to 40 more each year.

Released:
28-Jul-2014 12:00 PM EDT
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