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  • Embargo expired:
    14-Jun-2018 2:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 695962

eDNA Analysis: A key to Uncovering Rare Marine Species

Stony Brook University

An emerging tool that can be used with just a sample of seawater may help scientists learn more about rare marine life than ever before. According to Ellen Pikitch, PhD, of Stony Brook University’s School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences, this tool is eDNA analysis. Her explanation will be published in a perspectives piece on June 15 in Science.

Released:
11-Jun-2018 4:35 PM EDT
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Article ID: 696129

New Technique that Shows How a Protein “Light Switch” Works May Enhance Biological Research

Stony Brook University

New Technique that Shows How a Protein “Light Switch” Works May Enhance Biological Research

Released:
14-Jun-2018 10:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 696076

Potential for Life on Mars: Geosciences Professor Joel Hurowitz, PhD Available for Interview

Stony Brook University

Released:
13-Jun-2018 1:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 695856

Center for Biotechnology Named a National Accelerator for Health Security Innovations

Stony Brook University

Stony Brook University ‘s Center for Biotechnology (CFB) has been selected as one of eight U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) BARDA-DRIVe accelerators. Each of these accelerators is directed to support bioscience companies to develop health security innovations within the national ecosystem.

Released:
8-Jun-2018 12:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 695857

Weight Loss Surgical Intervention Risks Expert Dr. Aurora Pryor Available To Interview about Balloon/Bariatric Surgery Risk

Stony Brook University

Released:
8-Jun-2018 12:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 695094

Reservation for Two (Species): Fisherman And Dolphins Are Grabbing A Bite At The Same NY Artificial Reef

Stony Brook University

here’s plenty of fish in the sea for human fisherman and bottlenose dolphins to feast on and now, according to a study by researchers at Stony Brook University published in Marine Mammal Science, both species are using a New York artificial reef at the same time to find fish to eat – a new finding.

Released:
24-May-2018 12:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 694995

Would Popeye Choose Frozen Spinach Over Fresh (if Both Were Sautéed in Olive Oyl?)

Stony Brook University

Negative attitudes toward frozen vegetables may be impacting consumption of healthy foods, according to research by Stony Brook marketing professors published in Appetite. Consuming enough fruits and vegetables is important for maintaining a healthy diet and reducing risk factors for obesity and obesity-related illnesses. However, it’s estimated that 87% of the population in the United States doesn’t eat enough vegetables. Identifying barriers to vegetable consumption is important because lower income heads of households report they avoid buying fresh vegetables because they are afraid they will expire before they are consumed.

Released:
23-May-2018 10:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 695001

Kilauea's Activity Has Environmental Consequences, Yet the Oceans are Largely Unaffected

Stony Brook University

Released:
23-May-2018 10:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 694979

Real Time, Portable DNA Sequencing Fights Drug-Resistant TB

Stony Brook University

Scientists in Madagascar have for the first time performed DNA sequencing in-country using novel, portable technology to rapidly identify the bacteria responsible for tuberculosis (TB) and its drug resistance profile.

Released:
23-May-2018 8:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 694025

Breathing Lunar Dust Could Pose Health Risk to Future Astronauts

Stony Brook University

Future astronauts spending long periods of time on the Moon could suffer bronchitis and other health problems by inhaling tiny particles of dust from its surface, according to new research.

Released:
3-May-2018 1:05 PM EDT
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