Latest News from: University of Alabama at Birmingham

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Article ID: 699182

Automated Detection of Focal Epileptic Seizures in a Sentinel Area of the Human Brain

University of Alabama at Birmingham

Researchers have identified a sentinel area of the brain that gives an early warning before clinical seizure manifestations of focal epilepsy, and they can automatically detect that early warning. This offers the possibility of squelching the seizure — before the patient feels any symptoms.

Released:
17-Aug-2018 3:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 699037

Neonatal Pig Hearts Can Heal From Heart Attack

University of Alabama at Birmingham

The hearts of newborn piglets can almost completely heal themselves after experimental heart attacks, the first time this ability to regrow heart muscle has been shown in large mammals. This regenerative capacity disappears by day three after birth, researchers report in the journal Circulation.

Released:
15-Aug-2018 12:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 698848

Study Identifies Chaperone Protein Implicated in Parkinson’s Disease

University of Alabama at Birmingham

Reduced levels of a chaperone protein might have implications for the development of Parkinson’s disease and Lewy body dementia, according to new research from UAB. Chaperone protein 14-3-3 could lead to misfolding and spread of alpha-synuclein.

Released:
10-Aug-2018 3:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 698849

Experts available to discuss growing number of pregnant women that have opioid use disorders

University of Alabama at Birmingham

Released:
10-Aug-2018 3:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 698818

An Ion Channel Differentiates Newborn and Mature Neurons in the Adult Brain

University of Alabama at Birmingham

Newborn granule cells show high excitability that disappears as the cells mature. Now University of Alabama at Birmingham researchers have described key roles for G protein-mediated signaling and the late maturation of an ion channel during the differentiation of granule cells.

Released:
10-Aug-2018 10:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 698801

Epigenetic Reprogramming of Human Hearts Found in Congestive Heart Failure

University of Alabama at Birmingham

Researchers have now described an underlying mechanism that reprograms the hearts of patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy, a process that differs from patients with other forms of heart failure. This points the way toward future personalized care.

Released:
9-Aug-2018 4:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 698669

Too Much Water May Leave You High and Dry

University of Alabama at Birmingham

Staying hydrated while in the heat is almost common sense, but can too much water be a bad thing?

Released:
7-Aug-2018 2:40 PM EDT
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Article ID: 698613

Doxorubicin disrupts the immune system to cause heart toxicity

University of Alabama at Birmingham

Researchers have found an important contributor to heart pathology caused by the cancer drug doxorubicin — disruption of metabolism that controls immune responses in the spleen and heart. This allows chronic, non-resolving inflammation that leads to advanced heart failure.

Released:
6-Aug-2018 2:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 698532

Mobilizing the HPV vaccine

University of Alabama at Birmingham

Released:
3-Aug-2018 11:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 698497

ERAS pathway helps cesarean section mothers reduce recovery time and improve outcomes

University of Alabama at Birmingham

A new enhanced recovery after surgery process — also known as ERAS — has been developed and implemented at the University of Alabama at Birmingham to help enhance a mother’s recovery after a cesarean delivery, one of the most common surgeries performed in the United States.

Released:
2-Aug-2018 2:05 PM EDT
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