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Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Food, Hungry, Cornell, Centers, Disease, Control, Nutrition, Nhanes

10 million report hunger, even with jobs

Ten million Americans, including almost 4 million children, don't get enough to eat, according to a new Cornell University/Centers for Disease Control and Prevention study. More than half of the 4 percent of Americans who report they don't have enough food live in households in which at least one person has a job, says Katherine Alaimo, a doctoral candidate in nutritional sciences at Cornell.

Medicine

HIV, AIDS, Antiretroviral, Therapy, Protease, Inhibitors

Declining National Rates of HIV-Related Deaths and Illnesses Due to Combination Antiretroviral Therapy with Protease Inhibitors

A study from Northwestern University Medical School and the HIV Outpatient Study shows that aggressive combination antiretroviral therapy--specifically including protease inhibitors--dramatically reduces death rates and opportunistic infections in HIV-infected patients.

Medicine

Posttraumatic, Stress, Disorder, Intelligence, Trauma

Lower Intelligence may be a Risk Factor for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)

People with lower intelligence before a traumatic experience are more likely to develop posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms, according to the first study to identify a cognitive risk factor for PTSD. Conversely, higher intelligence may protect against the development of PTSD.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Child, Behavior, Cruelty, Boys, Girls

Boys and Girls Are Cruel to Each Other in Different Ways--But Effects Are Equally Harmful

The vast majority of past studies on peer victimization have focused on boys and physical aggression. But new research illustrates that girls also experience peer victimization, usually relational aggression, in which a person is harmed through hurtful manipulation of their peer relationships or friendships.

Medicine

Pregnancy, Prenatal, Vitamins, Antioxidants, Supplements, Vitamin, Alternative, Health

Breakthrough Study Shows Natural Vitamin E Supplement of Choice, Especially for Pregnant Women

A new landmark study suggests that pregnant women should ask their physicians for a prenatal supplement that contains "natural" vitamin E for optimal health insurance.

Medicine

Multiple Sclerosis (MS), Neurology, Copaxone

Copaxone Slows Progression of MS

Baltimore, MD ó A study published today in the March issue of the journal Neurology provides more evidence that the medication Copaxone", the only non-interferon treatment for multiple sclerosis, reduces the number of relapses and slows the progression of disability.

Business

Electricity Restructuring, Retail Wheeling, Public Utility Commissions

Factors Affecting the Pace of State-Level Electricity Restructuring Explored

A new paper issued by Resources for the Future looks at a variety of factors that may influence the rate at which state legislators and regulators move toward establishing retail competition among electricity suppliers. Researchers find that legislators are more likely to have considered adopting retail wheeling if consumers have much to gain from lower prices, or prices differ substantially from those in neighboring states.

Science

Food, Safety, Web, Site, meat, Poultry, Pathogens, Education

NC State Web Site Rated Among the Best for Food Safety News

Worried about food safety? A new Web site launched at North Carolina State University makes it easy for you to quickly get answers to your questions, in language you can understand. The site is located at http://www.ces.ncsu.edu/depts/foodsci/agentinfo.

Life

Arts and Humanities

Cody, Cornell, Far, Gone, Book

Paul Cody's new novel: "So Far Gone"

Cornell University alumnus and author Paul Cody's So Far Gone, a novel published by Picador USA, a literary imprint of St. Martin's Press, was released in February ($22; 240 pages, ISBN 0-312-18180-9).

Medicine

Cervical, Cancer, pap, Antigen, Prevention, Women, Tumor

Protein Antigen Holds Promise for Better Cervical Cancer Detection

An easily detectable protein may hold the key to more reliably warning women about early cell abnormalities in the cervix before they get life-threatening cancer, a University of California, Irvine researcher reported today.







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