Audio/Video

Add to Favorites | Subscribe | Share

Filters:

  • (Press "esc" to clear)

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Channels:

Parenting, Parenting Advice, Children, road crossing, Traffic, pedestrian safety , Child Safety, Psychology, Behavior, Cognition

Why Children Struggle to Safely Cross Busy Streets

Researchers have found children up to early teenagers lack the perceptual judgment and motor skills to safely cross a busy road consistently. Children placed in realistic, simulated environments were tested for their road-crossing abilities. Those from 6 to 12 years of age had trouble crossing the street, with accident rates as high as 8 percent with 6-year-olds. Results appear in the Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance.

Medicine

Channels:

Nationwide Children's Hospital, Neurosurgery, Spasticity, selective dorsal rhizotomy

Surgery Helps Young Girl with Cerebral Palsy Walk

Bhoomi was born with cerebral palsy and spasticity, a muscle control disorder that involves tight or stiff muscles and the inability to control those muscles. A spinal surgery called selective dorsal rhizotomy, has helped Bhoomi continue to make strides.

Science

Channels:

Genome, DNA, Bioinformatic, sequence DNA

As DNA Tests Become More Common, Researchers Rapidly Add Equipment to Keep Up

April 25 is National DNA Day commemorating the day in 1953 when scientists published papers in the journal Nature on the structure of DNA. Now, 64 years later, the concept is much more familiar to the average person and researchers are challenged to keep pace with ever-changing technology.

Medicine

Channels:

Prostate Cancer, Yale Cancer Center, hypofractionation

Yale Expert on Trials of Moderate Hypofractionation in Prostate Cancer

Medicine

Life

Arts and Humanities

Channels:

Cancer, Immunotherapy, Cancer Moonshot, Philanthropy, text2give, Rock And Roll, Concert, Poison, Rikki Rockett

Rock Tour “Text2Give” Supports Immunotherapy at UC San Diego Health

Rock star drummer Rikki Rockett feels very lucky to be on tour with his band, Poison, this spring. A year ago, he didn’t know if he would survive tongue cancer. But after participating in an immunotherapy clinical trial at Moores Cancer Center at UC San Diego Health, he was declared cancer-free in July 2016. To give back, Rockett is now asking concert-goers to join him in supporting immunotherapy at Moores Cancer Center.

Medicine

Channels:

tau, Tauopathy, Neurodegenerative Diseases

Antibody Helps Detect Protein Implicated in Alzheimer’s, Other Diseases

Tangles of the protein tau dot the brains of people with diseases like Alzheimer’s. Now, researchers have found a way to measure tau in the blood that accurately reflects tau in the brain. The study, in mice and a small group of people, could be the first step towards a non-invasive test for tau.

Medicine

Channels:

pediatric hydrocephalus, surgical training, 3D printing, Special Effects, neurosurgical education

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 25-Apr-2017 12:00 AM EDT

Medicine

Channels:

cranial base tumors, Acoustic Neuromas, vestibular schwannoma, chondromas

Two Surgeons Team Up to Remove 2,000 Cranial Base Tumors

In one of the nation’s longest and most successful surgical partnerships, Loyola Medicine neurosurgeon Douglas Anderson, MD, and otologic surgeon John Leonetti, MD, have worked together to remove nearly 2,000 cranial base tumors during the past 30 years.

Medicine

Channels:

Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Mount Sinai Health System, Dengue Fever, Viral Defense, immune activation, Immune Response, Mitochondria, Mitochondrial Dna

Researchers Identify Tactic Dengue Virus Uses to Delay Triggering Immune Response in Infected Host

Mount Sinai researchers describe novel mechanism cells use to recognize earliest stages of infection and how virus evades triggering an immune response

Medicine

Science

Channels:

Bacteriology, Biology

Grazing for the Greater Good: Study Finds Amoeba “Grazing,” Killing Bacteria Usually Protected by Film

A University of Wisconsin-Madison professor of bacteriology has shown the first proof that a certain group of amoeba called dictyostelids can penetrate biofilms and eat the bacteria within.







Chat now!