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  • Embargo expired:
    19-Jun-2018 9:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 696056

Cells can trap viruses in protein cage to stop their spread, study reveals

The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers at The Francis Crick Institute in London have discovered that cells can trap viruses in a protein cage to stop them from spreading to neighboring cells. The study, which will be published June 19 in the Journal of Cell Biology, reveals that the vaccinia virus can escape this trap by recruiting additional proteins to dismantle the cage and propel the virus out of the cell.

Released:
13-Jun-2018 9:40 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    19-Jun-2018 9:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 696048

Still no “magic bullet” treatment for a hangover … yet

Research Society on Alcoholism

Alcohol hangovers are more significant and costly than people realize, new research shows. Although individuals may be “street legal” to drive a car, or go to work and operate machinery, they can be just as impaired with a hangover as if they were over the alcohol limit. These observations and others will be shared at the 41st annual scientific meeting of the Research Society on Alcoholism (RSA) in San Diego June 17-21.

Released:
12-Jun-2018 8:05 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    19-Jun-2018 9:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 695921

Warnings to Texting Pedestrians May Not Eliminate Risks, But They Can Help

Human Factors and Ergonomics Society

Improving pedestrian safety even in the presence of warnings remains a challenge.

Released:
11-Jun-2018 10:30 AM EDT
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Article ID: 696289

Researcher Developing Innovative Process to Improve Environmental Sustainability and Water Quality

West Virginia University

West Virginia University could be at the forefront of solving a $57 billion dollar pollution problem and finding new ways to transform forestry waste into a cash crop for the state and region.

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19-Jun-2018 8:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 696231

Scientists Make the First Molecular Movie of One of Nature’s Most Widely Used Light Sensors

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

Scientists have made the first molecular movie of the instant when light hits a sensor that's widely used in nature for probing the environment and harvesting energy from light. The sensor, a form of vitamin A known as retinal, is central to a number of important light-driven processes in people, animals, microbes and algae, including human vision and some forms of photosynthesis, and the movie shows it changing shape in a trillionth of an eye blink.

Released:
19-Jun-2018 8:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 696287

Is the sky the limit?

University of Vienna

What stops a species adapting to an ever-wider range of conditions, continuously expanding its geographic range? The biomathematician Jitka Polechová, an Elise Richter Fellow at the University of Vienna, has published a paper in PLoS Biology which explains the formation of species’ range margins. The theory shows that just two compound parameters, important for both ecology and evolution of species, are fundamental to the stability of their range: the environmental heterogeneity and the size of the local population.

Released:
19-Jun-2018 6:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 696258

Scientists isolate protein data from the tiniest of caches – single human cells

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Scientists have captured the most information yet about proteins within a single human cell, giving scientists one of their clearest looks yet at the molecular happenings inside a human cell. The team detected on average more than 650 proteins in each cell – many times more than conventional techniques capture from single cells.

Released:
19-Jun-2018 12:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 696285

Scripps Graduate Student Discovers World’s First Known Manta Ray Nursery

University of California San Diego

A graduate student at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego and colleagues from NOAA’s Office of National Marine Sanctuaries have discovered the world’s first known manta ray nursery.

Released:
18-Jun-2018 6:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 696275

Studying Mars on Earth: Planetary scientist conducting astrobiological research in Mojave Desert

Northern Arizona University

Christopher Edwards received a $1.2 million grant from the PSTAR program to explore extreme environments on Earth for habitability and biosignatures, which can allow scientists to predict what to look for in space missions.

Released:
18-Jun-2018 5:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 696345

Scientists Go to Great Heights to Understand Changes in Earth’s Atmosphere

University of California San Diego

Human activities have impacted the Earth’s atmosphere over time. To better understand the impact of the human biogeochemical footprint on Earth, scientists at the University of California San Diego are literally climbing mountains to study the planet’s sulfur cycle—an agent in cardiovascular fitness and other human health benefits and resources.

Released:
18-Jun-2018 5:05 PM EDT
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