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Medicine

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cranial base tumors, Acoustic Neuromas, vestibular schwannoma, chondromas

Two Surgeons Team Up to Remove 2,000 Cranial Base Tumors

In one of the nation’s longest and most successful surgical partnerships, Loyola Medicine neurosurgeon Douglas Anderson, MD, and otologic surgeon John Leonetti, MD, have worked together to remove nearly 2,000 cranial base tumors during the past 30 years.

Medicine

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Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Mount Sinai Health System, Dengue Fever, Viral Defense, immune activation, Immune Response, Mitochondria, Mitochondrial Dna

Researchers Identify Tactic Dengue Virus Uses to Delay Triggering Immune Response in Infected Host

Mount Sinai researchers describe novel mechanism cells use to recognize earliest stages of infection and how virus evades triggering an immune response

Medicine

Science

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Bacteriology, Biology

Grazing for the Greater Good: Study Finds Amoeba “Grazing,” Killing Bacteria Usually Protected by Film

A University of Wisconsin-Madison professor of bacteriology has shown the first proof that a certain group of amoeba called dictyostelids can penetrate biofilms and eat the bacteria within.

Life

Law and Public Policy

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Sustainability, Carbon Pricing, Earth Day, Envionment, Fossil Fuels, College

Why Swarthmore Supports Putting a Price on Carbon Pollution

Swarthmore College is leading the effort among colleges and universities to support carbon pricing as a matter of policy.

Medicine

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Pasricha, Kulkarni, Gastroenterolgy, GUT, Nerve, Genetics

Hopkins Researchers Discover Birth-And-Death Life Cycle of Neurons in the Adult Mouse Gut

Johns Hopkins researchers today published new evidence refuting the long-held scientific belief that the gut nerve cells we’re born with are the same ones we die with.

Medicine

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Cachexia, Cancer, cancer advances, Wasting, Wasting Disease, Drug Trial, drug trials, Pilot Clinical Trial, Pilot Study, Pilot Clinical Trials, Pilot Program

Promising New Drug Development Could Help Treat Cachexia

According to the National Cancer Institute, nearly one-third of cancer deaths can be attributed to a wasting syndrome known as cachexia. Cachexia, an indicator of the advanced stages of disease, is a debilitating disorder that causes loss of appetite, lean body mass and can lead to multi-organ failure. Now, researchers at the University of Missouri in partnership with Tensive Controls, Inc. have developed a drug that could reverse cachexia. The team currently is seeking canine candidates for a pilot study to test the new drug.

Medicine

Science

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Cancer, Metabolism, Obesity, Breast Cancer, Cachexia, Colorectal Cancer, Cobre

UK Awarded $11.2 Million Grant to Launch New Center for Cancer and Metabolism

The University of Kentucky was recently awarded a prestigious Centers of Biomedical Research Excellence (COBRE) grant to study the metabolism of cancer from the National Institutes of General Medical Sciences, part of the National Institutes of Health. The $11.2 million grant will fund UK's Center for Cancer and Metabolism over the next five years.

Medicine

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Sleep Apnea, Sleep Patterns, Brain Injuries, TBI patients, Ut Southwestern

Study: Can Wrist Devices Detect Sleep Apnea with Lab Precision?

Researchers from the Peter O’Donnell Jr. Brain Institute will participate in a national study to determine whether medical devices used in the home can diagnose sleep apnea that often develops after traumatic brain injuries (TBI).

Science

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Giant Shipworm

Science Fiction Horror Wriggles Into Reality with Discovery of Giant Sulfur-Powered Shipworm

Our world seems to grow smaller by the day as biodiversity rapidly dwindles, but Mother Earth still has a surprise or two up her sleeve. An international team of researchers were the first to investigate a never before studied species a giant, black, mud dwelling, worm-like animal. The findings will be published online in the Apr. 17 issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Science

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SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Femtosecond, Quantum Physics

Why Study in Femtoseconds?

The text on this screen may appear stable enough, but every molecule, atom, and electron in it is in constant motion. The laws of quantum physics require that on the atomic scale nothing is ever truly at rest. Nano-sized motion also keeps us warm, cooks our food, lights our smartphones, and enables all of our senses of hearing, sight, smell, taste, and touch.







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