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Article ID: 12107

Combating Bighorn Sheep Diseases

University of Idaho

Bacteria can make or break efforts to restore bighorn sheep to Hells Canyon and their other historic ranges in the West. University of Idaho research evaluates bacteria from wildlife and livestock to identify killer strains and how the strains vary.

Released:
22-Apr-1999 12:00 AM EDT
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    22-Apr-1999 12:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 12061

Midwest's Earthquake Hazard Lower Than Thought

Northwestern University

The risk posed by large earthquakes in the Midwest's New Madrid seismic zone to cities such as Memphis and St. Louis is much lower than previously thought, according to a new study that used the Global Positioning System (GPS) satellites to track the motions of the ground in the seismic zone.

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22-Apr-1999 12:00 AM EDT
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    22-Apr-1999 12:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 12053

Great Earthquake at New Madrid Is Unlikely

University of Missouri

In a study published in this week's edition of Science, a University of Missouri-Columbia geologist finds that the predicted big earthquake in the New Madrid fault line is thousands of years away.

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22-Apr-1999 12:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 385

Plasticizer Disrupts Male Reproductive Function in Rats

CIIT Centers for Health Research

Research at CIIT indicates the plasticizer di(n-butyl)phthalate (DBP) at high doses disrupts a variety of reproductive functions in male rats when exposed in the womb during late gestation, a crucial time window for sexual development.

Released:
22-Apr-1999 12:00 AM EDT
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    21-Apr-1999 12:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 12065

Sundial Will Mark Passage of Days on Mars

University of Washington

Martian Standard Time takes effect in January 2002 when a sundial designed and assembled at the University of Washington lands on the red planet aboard NASA's 2001 Mars Surveyor. The project is part of a package of experiments being produced by Cornell University.

Released:
21-Apr-1999 12:00 AM EDT
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    21-Apr-1999 12:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 12060

Earliest Modern Tree Lived 360-345 Million Years Ago

Virginia Tech

Archaeopteris, an extinct tree that made up most of the forests across the earth in the Late Devonian period, had the same structure as modern trees, report three Virginia Tech scientists in the April 22, 1999, issue of Nature.

Released:
21-Apr-1999 12:00 AM EDT
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    21-Apr-1999 12:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 12028

Humanity Will Send Sundial to Another Planet

Cornell University

For the first time in history, humanity will send a sundial to another planet. Inscribed with the motto "Two Worlds, One Sun," the sundial will travel to Mars aboard NASA's Mars Surveyor 2001 lander.

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21-Apr-1999 12:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 12059

Mt. Washington's Wild Weather and Aircraft Icing

National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR)

The National Center for Atmospheric Research's Mt. Washington Winter Icing and Storms Project is testing methods for remote sensing and improved prediction of in-flight icing conditions that can down small aircraft.

Released:
20-Apr-1999 12:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 12055

Microgravity May Enhance Plant Gene Transfer

University of Wisconsin-Madison

Transferring desirable genes into crops is a high-tech game of chance, with success rates running about one in 1,000. But the odds get a whole lot better when you remove gravity from the mix.

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20-Apr-1999 12:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 12051

Climate Model Projections for 21st Century

National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR)

Carbon dioxide emissions over the next century could increase wintertime precipitation in the U.S. Southwest and Great Plains by 40% as global average temperature rises 3 degrees Fahrenheit, according to a new climate model developed at the National Center for Atmospheric Research.

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20-Apr-1999 12:00 AM EDT
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