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Article ID: 7108

Cricket-Spitting Contest to Reappear At '98 Bug Bowl

Purdue University

Cockroach racing will get a run for its money from the latest popular insect activity ã cricket spitting ã at Purdue University's annual Bug Bowl April 18-19.

Released:
10-Apr-1998 12:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 7105

Tip Sheet from New Scientist for 4-08-98

New Scientist

Tip Sheet from New Scientist for 4-08-98

Released:
9-Apr-1998 12:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 7098

Artificial Stream Gets Polluted Like the Real Thing

Northwestern University

Happy to have water in her basement, a Northwestern University environmental engineer has constructed an artificial stream to study how toxic pollutants like PCBs enter the food web from riverbeds.

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9-Apr-1998 12:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 7097

Shuttle Mission's "Neurolab" To Study Nervous System

National Science Foundation (NSF)

Early on the morning of April 16, 1998, dozens of snails and fish will go where only a few men and women have gone before: into outer space. The snails and fish will travel aboard NASA's Space Shuttle Columbia, as part of a research project funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) to study the development of gravity sensors in space by animals in the early stages of life.

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9-Apr-1998 12:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 7093

News about Science, Technology and Engineering at Iowa State University

Iowa State University

Science and engineering tips from Iowa State University include: 1.) Superpave could cut costs of repaving roads; 2.) Metal-metal composites readied for commerical use; and 3.) ABC replica will be displayed at Veishea spring celebration.

Released:
9-Apr-1998 12:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 7091

Sea Grant Story Tip Sheet for April 8, 1998

National Sea Grant College Program

Sea Grant Story IDea Tip Sheet for April 8, 1998 1) Study Finds Humpback Whales at Risk in Hawaii 2) New Biodegradable Treatment May Reduce Great Lakes Exotic Specie Threat 3) Linking Town Halls To Technology - Project NEMO Educates Decision Makers

Released:
9-Apr-1998 12:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 7084

Microchip sensor detects bacteria

Cornell University

Cornell University researchers have merged the fields of nanofabrication and biology to produce a simple but effective means to detect harmful bacteria. The new biosensor on a silicon chip can detect minute quantities of bacteria, and could be incorporated into a simple handheld device that report results instantly

Released:
8-Apr-1998 12:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 7083

Tinkertoy robot shows how humans walk

Cornell University

Without spinning parts, motor or control system, a two-legged robot toy, developed at Cornell University is stable in motion, but can't stand in any position, providing mechanical engineers with new insights into human walking. Made of Tinkertoy parts, the walker uses only gravity and intertia, says Michael J. Coleman and Andy Ruina, mechanical engineers.

Released:
8-Apr-1998 12:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 7074

Los Alamos Unveils New Brain-Imaging System

Los Alamos National Laboratory

Researchers today unveiled a new medical instrument that will help physicians assess patients with brain injuries and diseases and even help solve the mysteries of how the brain works. It is scheduled for clinical trials in the near future.

Released:
8-Apr-1998 12:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 7070

New Materials Hold Promise for Fixing Ailing Infrastructure

Missouri University of Science and Technology

It isn't the typical Band-Aid approach to solving infrastructure problems, but new lightweight materials that can be wrapped like a bandage around deteriorating concrete beams and columns may become a cost-effective solution to ailing roads and bridges.

Released:
8-Apr-1998 12:00 AM EDT
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