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Article ID: 1865

Coevolution argues for preserving large land areas

Washington State University

By the late 1980s, Thompson had developed the geographic mosaic theory of coevolution, which argues that the long-term dynamics of coevolution occur over large geographic areas rather than within local populations. Much of his current research is directed toward evaluating this theory, his work on Greya moths and the plants they pollinate, for example.

Released:
18-Feb-1997 12:00 AM EST
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    17-Feb-1997 12:00 AM EST

Article ID: 1833

When Did Time Begin?

University of California, Santa Cruz

When did time begin? Physicist Joel Primack argues that science can answer the question. It's a fantastic scenario, involving the Big Bang, inflation, and "eternal inflation." He'll explain it all at the AAAS meeting in Seattle.

Released:
13-Feb-1997 12:00 AM EST
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    16-Feb-1997 12:00 AM EST

Article ID: 1971

How Influenza Virus Is Formed

Northwestern University

The influenza virus reproduces itself by pushing out a portion of a cell's outer membrane and pinching it off --- creating a new viral paricle than can go on to infect another cell. Just how the virus succeeds in pushing out the membrane has been clsarified by researchers at Northwestern University

Released:
12-Mar-1997 12:00 AM EST
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    16-Feb-1997 12:00 AM EST

Article ID: 1832

Estimated Ages of Oldest Stars Probably Won't Fall Below 15 Billion Years

University of California, Santa Cruz

Are the oldest stars in the galaxy more ancient than the universe itself? That's the embarrassing conundrum facing astronomers today. At the AAAS meeting in Seattle, astronomer Michael Bolte will discuss solid evidence that stellar ages won't fall below 15 billion years.

Released:
13-Feb-1997 12:00 AM EST
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Article ID: 1854

Catching Bugs In Quantum Computers

Los Alamos National Laboratory

Los Alamos researchers have devised a scheme and algorithms to correct errors in quamtum computers, proposed machines that would manipulate the quantum states of individual atoms to perform calculations.

Released:
14-Feb-1997 12:00 AM EST
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Article ID: 1853

UNM Micro-chip at Heart of Hubble Upgrade

University of New Mexico

A micro-chip designed at the University of New Mexico's Microelectronics Research Center is at the heart of an upgrade unit being installed on the hubble Space Telescope next week.

Released:
14-Feb-1997 12:00 AM EST
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Article ID: 1850

Oscar Recognizes NSF-Supported Films

National Science Foundation (NSF)

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences has nominated two documentary films produced with support from the National Science Foundation for an Academy Award.

Released:
14-Feb-1997 12:00 AM EST
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Article ID: 1848

Making The Multimedia Future A Reality

National Science Foundation (NSF)

In the next century, a personal computer could know from the inflection in your voice -- or by a smile or frown -- what you want it to do. Basic research in multimedia technology funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) is moving us much closer to that reality.

Released:
14-Feb-1997 12:00 AM EST
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Article ID: 1847

Biggest Earthquakes Of '96 Rattle China, Indonesia

US Geological Survey (USGS)

China and Indonesia suffered the deadliest and most destructive earthquakes in 1996, while the U.S. remained relatively quiet according to scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior. The last deadly earthquake in the U.S. was the 1994 Northridge, Calif., quake that took 60 lives.

Released:
14-Feb-1997 12:00 AM EST
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    14-Feb-1997 12:00 AM EST

Article ID: 1831

Symmetry at its Smallest

University of California, Santa Cruz

Symmetries are evident everywhere in nature, even at the smallest scales of subatomic particles. At the AAAS meeting in Seattle, physicist Michael Dine will describe the latest work toward a theory of supersymmetry, which could round out the Standard Model of particle physics.

Released:
13-Feb-1997 12:00 AM EST
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