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Science

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Endurance Training, endurance running, long distance running, Exercise, Muscle Inflammation, Myositis, Muscles, Binghamton, Binghamton University, SUNY Binghamton, State University of New York at Binghamton, Immune System, Drugs, Medication, Medicine, Microrna, skeletal muscle, Protein, Immune Cells, Fitness, Running, Health

Endurance Training Helpful in Recovery From Muscle Inflammation, New Study Shows

Endurance training can actually be helpful in dealing with muscle inflammation, according to a new paper co-written by faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York, and Karolinska Institutet and Karolinska University Hospital in Stockholm, Sweden.

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bioinspired tech, Bioinspired Engineering, bioinspired design, Robotic Device, Underwater Robot, Fluid Dynamics

NUS-Developed Manta Ray Robot Swims Faster and Operates Up to 10 Hours

Researchers from the National University of Singapore (NUS) have created MantaDroid, an aquatic robot that emulates the swimming locomotion of manta rays. The robotic manta ray, which swims at the speed of twice its body length per second and can operate for up to 10 hours, could potentially be employed for underwater surveillance in future.

Science

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man's ancestors , earliest fossils of mammals from line that led to humans, eutherian mammals

Man's Earliest Ancestors Discovered In Southern England

The two teeth are from small, rat-like creatures that lived 145 million years ago in the shadow of the dinosaurs. They are the earliest undisputed fossils of mammals belonging to the line that led to human beings.

Medicine

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Digital Storytelling Helps Encourage Latinas to Seek Therapy for Depression and Anxiety

A UCLA Nursing professor has found that culturally tailored multimedia content holds great promise for encouraging Latina women to seek help for, and address the symptoms of, anxiety and depression.

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New Approach to Geoengineering Simulations Is Significant Step Forward

Using a sophisticated computer model, scientists have demonstrated for the first time that a new research approach to geoengineering could potentially be used to limit Earth’s warming to a specific target while reducing some of the risks and concerns identified in past studies, including uneven cooling of the globe.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Korea, President Morton Schapiro

In Korea, President Schapiro Analyzes Future of Higher Education

Northwestern University President Morton Schapiro told a global forum in Seoul, South Korea, that the critical skill for students to acquire in higher education in this technological era is “the ability to educate yourself for a lifetime."

Science

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Ecology, Climate Change, Wildflowers, Pollinators, Evolution, Ecological Changes

How Climate Change May Reshape Subalpine Wildflower Communities

An unseasonably warm, dry summer in 2015 on Washington state's Mount Rainier caused subalpine wildflowers to change their bloom times and form 'reassembled' communities, with unknown consequences for species interactions among wildflowers, pollinators and other animals.

Medicine

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Genocide, Rwanda, evil, Mass Murder, The Ohio State University

People Who Commit Genocide Are Not Evil

Hollie Nyseth Brehm, assistant professor of sociology and criminology at The Ohio State University, talks about her research in genocide, http://go.osu.edu/geno

Medicine

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Alzheimer's Disease, Amyloid Beta, Brain Diseases, Drug Discovery And Development, Neuroscience, Aging

How SORLA Protects Against Alzheimer’s Disease

Researchers have identified a new protective function for a brain protein genetically linked to Alzheimer’s. The findings, published in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, could inform novel treatment strategies to combat neurodegenerative diseases.

Science

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Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF), Center For Nanoscale Materials, Materials Science, Nanoscience, Mathematics, computing, & computer science, Modeling, simulation & visualization

The Flat and the Curious

Argonne researchers have simulated the growth of the 2-D material silicene. Their work, published in Nanoscale, delivers new and useful insights on the material’s properties and behavior and offers a predictive model for other researchers studying 2-D materials.







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