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Insurance Coverage for IVF Increases Chance of Having Baby

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Women who pursue in vitro fertilization (IVF) to become pregnant are more likely to give birth if they have health insurance that covers the procedure, according to new research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. The key reason is financial rather than medical: For many people, the high cost for one IVF procedure prohibits women from seeking a second treatment if the first attempt fails. The study is published March 28 in The Journal of the American Medical Association.

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kidney disease research, American Society Of Nephrology, NIH, Niddk, Congress, Gao, Living Donor Protection Act

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A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 29-Mar-2017 9:00 AM EDT

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Vitamin D and cancer

New Study Suggests That Vitamin D Decreases Risk of Cancer

Evidence suggests that low vitamin D status may increase the risk of cancer.

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Gynecologic Cancers Expert at NewYork-Presbyterian Available to Discuss the Safety and Effectiveness of Laparoscopic Hysterectomies for Early Stage Endometrial Cancer Based on a New Study in JAMA of the LACE Trial

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Wealth Inequality, Constructal Law, wealth distribution, flow system, Movement, nonuniformity, flow architecture, Adrian Bejan, Marcelo R. Errera, Duke University, Federal University of Paraná , Journal of Applied Physics

Physics Can Predict Wealth Inequality

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The 2016 election year highlighted the growing problem of wealth inequality and finding ways to help the people who are falling behind. This human urge of compassion isn’t new, but the big question that remains to be addressed is why inequality is so difficult to erase. This inspired Adrian Bejan at Duke University, who in 1996 discovered the Constructal Law, to provide an answer.

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Predictability, Randomness, Deterministic, Deterministic Chaos, soil tilling, stick-slip dynamics, normalized deterministic nonlinear prediction (NDNP), Kenshi Sakai, Shrinivasa K. Upadhyaya, Pedro Andrade-Sanchez, Nina Sviridova, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, University of California, Davis, Meiji University, University Of Arizona

Understanding Predictability and Randomness by Digging in the Dirt

When tilling soil, the blade of the tool cuts through dirt, loosening it in preparation for seeding. The dirt granules are pushed aside in a way that looks random -- but might not be. Now, researchers have found a way to distinguish whether such a process is truly random, or is actually deterministic -- which can lead to deeper understanding and the ability to control the process. They describe the analysis in the journal Chaos.

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Optometry, color terminology, Lexicon, Language evolution

Why Don’t Americans Have a Name for the Color “Light Blue?”

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“Mizu” translates to “water” and has emerged in recent decades as a unique shade in the Japenese lexicon, new research has found. Color terminology varies widely from country to country, and the U.S. and Japan have many different colors for which they have specific words.

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David Polsky, Nyu Langone, Skin Cancer, Melanoma, tert, BRAF, NRAS, Aacr Annual Meeting, BioRad

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A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 2-Apr-2017 1:00 PM EDT

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Alexander Meves M.D., Cancer Center, Mayo Clinic, Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine, Medical Research, Minnesota News Release, news release, Precision Medicine

Mayo Clinic Researchers Identify Interaction Among Proteins That Cause Cancer Cells to Metastasize

Researchers at Mayo Clinic have identified an interaction among proteins that allows cancer cells to grow and metastasize. They say the discovery may play a role in developing a better understanding of how tumors grow in a variety of malignancies, including breast, prostate, pancreatic, colon, lung and skin cancers.

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Palenontology, Dinosaur, anatomic pathology

New Research Disproves Common Assumption on Cranial Joints of Alligators, Birds, Dinosaurs

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Researchers from the University of Missouri School Of Medicine recently discovered that although alligators, birds and dinosaurs have a similar skull-joint shape, this does not guarantee that their movements are the same.







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