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Science

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Archaeology, ROME, cement production, Construction material, Corrosion

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 3-Jul-2017 1:00 PM EDT

Medicine

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Insulin Resistance, Type 2 Diabetes

Exercise May Help Prevent Insulin Resistance, a Precursor to Type 2 Diabetes, University of Arkansas Researcher Finds

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Life

Education

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University Of Utah, Martell Teasley, College of Social Work, social work education

Utah Appoints New Dean at College of Social Work

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The University of Utah has appointed Martell Teasley as the next dean of the College of Social Work. Teasley, who will begin his term on July 1, 2017, comes to the U from the University of Texas at San Antonio, where he served as chair of the Department of Social Work in the College of Public Policy for the past five years. His impressive array of experience also includes the development of a disaster management certificate program at Florida State University’s College of Social Work, employment as a drug and alcohol counselor, time as a licensed practical nurse and a decade of service with the U.S. Army.

Medicine

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EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 28-Jun-2017 6:00 AM EDT

Science

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Evolution, tyrosine biosynthesis, secondary metabolism

Pulling the Tablecloth Out From Under Essential Metabolism

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Most organisms share the biosynthetic pathways for making crucial nutrients because it is is dangerous to tinker with them. But now a collaborative team of scientists has caught plants in the process of altering where and how cells make an essential amino acid.

Science

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Detecting Diluteness

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Engineers at Washington University in St. Louis and Princeton University developed a new way to dive into the cell's tiniest and most important components. What they found inside membraneless organelles surprised them, and could lead to better understanding of fatal diseases including cancer, Huntington's and ALS.

Science

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Materials, Materials Science, material sciences, topological, topological matter, 2-D, 2D, Berkeley, Berkeley Lab, LBNL, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, UC Berkeley, University of California, Berkeley, 2-D materials, Advanced Light Source, X-Ray, X-rays, photon science

2-D Material’s Traits Could Send Electronics R&D Spinning in New Directions

Researchers created an atomically thin material at Berkeley Lab and used X-rays to measure its exotic and durable properties that make it a promising candidate for a budding branch of electronics known as “spintronics.”

Medicine

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supar protein , Kidney Disease, Kidney Failure, Nephrology, Blacks, Genetic Mutation

Catalyst for Genetic Kidney Disease in Black People Identified

Between 15 and 20 percent of black people carry a genetic mutation that puts them at risk for certain chronic kidney disease, but only about half of them develop the illness – a variance that long has puzzled researchers. Now a study has found that the gene mutation’s toxic effects require higher than normal levels of a protein called suPAR to trigger the onset and progression of the disease.

Science

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Amino Acids, Plants, Botany, Chemistry

Peanut Family Secret for Making Chemical Building Blocks Revealed

The peanut and its kin have not one, but two ways to make the amino acid tyrosine, one of the 20 required to make all of its proteins, and an essential human nutrient. That might seem small, but why this plant family has a unique way to make such an important chemical building block is a mystery that has captured the attention of Hiroshi Maeda, a professor of botany at the University of Wisconsin–Madison.

Medicine

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Nanotechnology, Immunotherapy

Using ‘Sticky’ Nanoparticles, Researchers Develop New Strategy to Boost Body’s Cancer Defenses

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In the journal Nature Nanotechnology, University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers report on strides made in the development of a strategy to improve the immune system's detection of cancer proteins by using “sticky” nanoparticles.







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