Audio/Video

Add to Favorites | Subscribe | Share

Filters:

  • (Press "esc" to clear)

Science

Channels:

Anthropology, Archaeology, Conservation Biology, Plants, ancient diet, Agriculture, Native American, Potato

Utah Is Home to Earliest Use of a Wild Potato in North America

Researchers have discovered the earliest evidence of wild potato use in North America. This is the first archaeological study to identify a spud-bearing species native to the southwestern United States, the Four Corners potato (S. jamesii), as an important part of ancient human diets.

Science

Channels:

Archaeology, ROME, cement production, Construction material, Corrosion

How Seawater Strengthens Ancient Roman Concrete

While modern marine concrete structures crumble within decades, 2,000-year-old Roman piers and breakwaters endure to this day, and are stronger now than when they were first constructed. University of Utah geologist Marie Jackson studies the minerals and microscale structures of Roman concrete as she would a volcanic rock. She and her colleagues have found that seawater filtering through the concrete leads to the growth of interlocking minerals that lend the concrete added cohesion.

Medicine

Channels:

healthy Fourth of July

Tips for Hosting a Healthy Fourth of July Cookout

Two dietitians -- Erin Morse and Dana Hunnes -- share tips on how to have a festive Fourth of July party while keeping it healthy.

Medicine

Channels:

Cataract, lens, fiber cell, secondary cataract, Crystallin, National Eye Institute (NEI), Blindness, Retina, Vision, eye

NEI Charts a Clearer Future for Cataract Prevention and Treatment

Research funded by the National Eye Institute aims to reverse progression of cataracts—the most common cause of blindness worldwide—or to prevent them from forming altogether.

Science

Channels:

Antarctica, Antarctic Expedition, Antarctic Research, Climate Change, Global Warming, larsen c ice shelf, Glacier erosion, Glaciers, Global Climate, Ecosystem

Larsen C Ice Shelf Collapse: Expert Video and Interview Available, Facebook Live Event 7/14 at 10 a.m. CT

Medicine

Channels:

Prescription Drug Cost, Senior Citizens, medication review, Adherence, Prescription Drug

Older Americans Don’t Get – or Seek – Enough Help From Doctors & Pharmacists on Drug Costs, Poll Finds

The majority of Americans over age 50 take two or more prescription medicines to prevent or treat health problems, and many of them say the cost weighs on their budget, a new poll finds. But many older adults aren’t getting – or asking for – as much help as they could from their doctors and pharmacists to find lower-cost options, the new data reveal.

Science

Channels:

biodiversity gradient, Smithsonian Institution, CTFS-ForestGEO network, soil pathogens

Global Forest Network Cracks the Case of Tropical Biodiversity

Why does biodiversity grade from exuberance at the equator through moderation at mid-latitudes toward monotony at higher ones? Data from an international network of long-term forest dynamics research sites is finally providing an answer.

Science

Channels:

Physiology And Therapeutics, Molecular Biology, Cell and Molecular Biology, cell delivery, Pharmacology, pharmacology and therapeutics

GPS for Cell "Highways"? 3D Model System Illustrates How Molecular Motors Navigate

New research explains navigation in the fundamental cargo transport process that occurs in every cell in the human body and may point to therapeutic targets for a host of diseases like cancer.

Science

Channels:

CRISPR, Cas3, Cas9, Structure, Cryo Electron Microscope, cryo-EM, Harvard Medical School, Maofu Liao, Cornell University

Bringing CRISPR Into Focus

Harvard Medical School study generates near-atomic resolution images of key steps in CRISPR-Cas3 function, revealing layers of error detection that prevent unintended genomic damage. Structural understanding informs efforts to improve CRISPR systems for gene editing and reduce off-target effects.

Medicine

Science

Channels:

Peter Devreotes, cell, Migration, Yuchuan Miao, Molecules, Johns Hopkins, Migrate

Scientists Manipulate 'Signaling' Molecules to Control Cell Migration

Johns Hopkins researchers report they have uncovered a mechanism in amoebae that rapidly changes the way cells migrate by resetting their sensitivity to the naturally occurring internal signaling events that drive such movement.







Chat now!