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Article ID: 688994

Lactation Hormone Cues Birds to Be Good Parents

Cornell University

Toppling a widespread assumption that a “lactation” hormone only cues animals to produce food for their babies, Cornell University researchers have shown the hormone also prompts zebra finches to be good parents.

Released:
5-Feb-2018 3:20 PM EST
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Birds, Cell Biology, Chemistry, Local - New York, All Journal News

Article ID: 688971

How Does Your Brain "Code" Pizza?

University of Kentucky

At the International Society of Neurogastronomy symposium, neuroscientists, food scientists, and chefs will discuss food-brain phenomena and their role in health and medicine.

Released:
5-Feb-2018 2:05 PM EST
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Food Science, Obesity, All Journal News

  • Embargo expired:
    5-Feb-2018 11:00 AM EST

Article ID: 688894

Hubble Probes Atmospheres of Exoplanets in TRAPPIST-1 Habitable Zone

Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI)

Astronomers using the Hubble Space Telescope have conducted the first spectroscopic survey of the Earth-sized planets within the habitable zone around the nearby star TRAPPIST-1. Hubble reveals that at least three of the exoplanets (d, e, and f) do not seem to contain puffy, hydrogen-rich atmospheres similar to gaseous planets such as Neptune. The results, instead, favor more compact atmospheres like those of Earth, Venus, and Mars.

Released:
5-Feb-2018 11:00 AM EST
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All Journal News, Particle Physics, Physics, Space, Nature (journal), Local - Maryland, Mars

Article ID: 688901

Study Suggests Climate Models May Underestimate Future Polar Warming

University of Florida

A new international analysis of marine fossils shows that warming of the polar oceans during the Eocene, a greenhouse period that provides a glimpse of Earth’s potential future climate, was greater than previously thought.

Released:
2-Feb-2018 1:05 PM EST
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All Journal News, Climate Science, Environmental Science, Marine Science

Article ID: 688847

Even Small Changes Within an Ecosystem Can Have Detrimental Effects

Binghamton University, State University of New York

A mutualistic relationship between species in an ecosystem allows for the ecosystem to thrive, but the lack of this relationship could lead to the collapse of the entire system. New research from Binghamton University, State University of New York reveals that interactions between relatively small organisms are crucial to mutualistic relationships in an ecosystem dominated by much larger organisms, including trees and elephants.

Released:
1-Feb-2018 3:40 PM EST
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Article ID: 688762

Columbia Engineers Develop Flexible Lithium Battery for Wearable Electronics

Columbia University School of Engineering and Applied Science

Columbia Engineering researchers have developed a prototype of a high-performance flexible lithium-ion battery that demonstratesconcurrentlyboth good flexibility and high energy density. The battery is shaped like the human spine and allows remarkable flexibility, high energy density, and stable voltage no matter how it is flexed or twisted. The device could help advance applications for wearable electronics. (Advanced Materials.)

Released:
31-Jan-2018 3:40 PM EST
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Energy, Engineering, Materials Science, Technology, All Journal News, DOE Science News, Local - New York, Local - New York Metro

Article ID: 688760

Machine Learning Techniques Generate Clinical Labels of Medical Scans

Mount Sinai Health System

The study’s findings will help train artificial intelligence to diagnose diseases

Released:
31-Jan-2018 3:10 PM EST
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Neuro, Surgery, Technology, Healthcare, All Journal News, Local - New York, Local - New York Metro

  • Embargo expired:
    31-Jan-2018 2:00 PM EST

Article ID: 688605

Stroke Recovery Improved by Sensory Deprivation, Mouse Study Shows

Washington University in St. Louis

Mice that had experienced strokes were more likely to recover the ability to use a front paw if their whiskers were clipped following a stroke. Trimming the whiskers deprives an area of the mouse’s brain from receiving sensory signals from the animals’ whiskers. And it leaves that area of the brain more plastic – or receptive to rewiring to take on new tasks.

Released:
29-Jan-2018 12:05 PM EST
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All Journal News, Mental Health, Neuro, Grant Funded News

  • Embargo expired:
    31-Jan-2018 12:00 PM EST

Article ID: 688681

‘Anxiety Cells’ Identified in the Brain’s Hippocampus

Columbia University Medical Center

Researchers have identified cells that indicate anxiety in the brains of mice.

Released:
30-Jan-2018 1:05 PM EST
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Mental Health, Neuro, Psychology and Psychiatry, Cell Biology, Local - New York, Local - New York Metro, All Journal News, Grant Funded News, Featured: DailyWire

Article ID: 688703

SLAC Scientists Investigate How Metal 3-D Printing Can Avoid Producing Flawed Parts

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

Scientists at the Department of Energy’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory are using X-ray light to observe and understand how the process of making metal parts using three-dimensional (3-D) printing can leave flaws in the finished product – and discover how those flaws can be prevented.

Released:
30-Jan-2018 3:30 PM EST
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Engineering, Materials Science, DOE Science News, Energy, Local - California


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