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Article ID: 696281

Mayo Clinic Discovers Gene Mutations Linked to Pancreatic Cancer, Calls for Expanded Testing

Mayo Clinic

ROCHESTER, Minn. — Six genes contain mutations that may be passed down in families, substantially increasing a person’s risk for pancreatic cancer. That's according to Mayo Clinic research published in the June 19 edition of the JAMA. However, because researchers found these genetic mutations in patients with no family history of pancreatic cancer, they are recommending genetic testing for all pancreatic cancer patients as the new standard of care.

Released:
19-Jun-2018 11:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 696296

Success of Blood Test for Autism Affirmed

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI)

One year after researchers published their work on a physiological test for autism, a follow-up study confirms its exceptional success in assessing whether a child is on the autism spectrum.

Released:
19-Jun-2018 10:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 696305

ORNL researchers use AI to improve mammogram interpretation

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

In an effort to reduce errors in the analyses of diagnostic images by health professionals, a team of researchers from Oak Ridge National Laboratory has improved understanding of the cognitive processes involved in image interpretation, work that has enormous potential to improve health outcomes for the hundreds of thousands of American women affected by breast cancer each year. The ORNL-led team found that analyses of mammograms by radiologists were significantly influenced by context bias, or the radiologist’s previous diagnostic experiences.

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19-Jun-2018 10:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 696249

Seattle Children's Opens Immunotherapy Trial For Children With Relapsed Central Nervous System Tumors That Delivers CAR T Cells Directly Into the Brain

Seattle Children's Hospital

Seattle Children’s has opened a pioneering chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell immunotherapy trial for children and young adults with relapsed or refractory HER2-positive central nervous system (CNS) tumors where CAR T cells will be delivered directly into the brain. In the phase I trial, BrainChild-01, cancer-fighting CAR T cells will be infused through a catheter, either into the cavity where the tumor has been removed or the CNS ventricular system, depending on the location of the tumor.

Released:
19-Jun-2018 9:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 696229

$1.9 million grant aims to improve behavioral health care delivery

University of Illinois at Chicago

Graduate students in the Jane Addams College of Social Work at the University of Illinois at Chicago will receive specialized training to help individuals with mental health issues in Chicago’s marginalized communities.

Released:
19-Jun-2018 9:00 AM EDT
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Article ID: 696272

New, Reliable Source of Free Information for People with Liver, Gallbladder, or Bile Duct Cancer, Offered by NCCN

National Comprehensive Cancer Network® (NCCN®)

National Comprehensive Cancer Network releases new patient guidelines for liver, gallbladder, and bile duct (hepatobiliary) cancers, sponsored by the Global Liver Institute.

Released:
19-Jun-2018 9:00 AM EDT
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Embargo will expire:
25-Jun-2018 9:00 AM EDT
Released to reporters:
19-Jun-2018 9:00 AM EDT

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 25-Jun-2018 9:00 AM EDT

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Article ID: 696276

Low Vitamin D Levels Associated with Scarring Lung Disease

Johns Hopkins Medicine

Reviewing medical information gathered on more than 6,000 adults over a 10-year period, Johns Hopkins researchers have found that lower than normal blood levels of vitamin D were linked to increased risk of early signs of interstitial lung disease (ILD).

Released:
19-Jun-2018 9:00 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    19-Jun-2018 9:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 696114

Certain Types of Media Activity Among Youth May Be Linked to Certain Psychopathologies

Research Society on Alcoholism

Adolescence is a critical time for development of the brain, as well as accompanying cognitive and socioemotional abilities. It is also a time of high media activity. Results of the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) study that examined the effects of media activity on psychopathology among youth will be shared at the 41st annual scientific meeting of the Research Society on Alcoholism (RSA) in San Diego June 17-21.

Released:
13-Jun-2018 9:05 PM EDT
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

  • Embargo expired:
    19-Jun-2018 9:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 696056

Cells can trap viruses in protein cage to stop their spread, study reveals

The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers at The Francis Crick Institute in London have discovered that cells can trap viruses in a protein cage to stop them from spreading to neighboring cells. The study, which will be published June 19 in the Journal of Cell Biology, reveals that the vaccinia virus can escape this trap by recruiting additional proteins to dismantle the cage and propel the virus out of the cell.

Released:
13-Jun-2018 9:40 AM EDT
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